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Uncover the secrets of the industry's top digital photographers from the author of The Digital Photography Book, parts 1, 2, 3 & 4 




VOICES THAT MATTER™ 




Adobe' 





THE ADOBE PHOTOSHOP CS6 BOOK FOR DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHERS 



The Adobe Photoshop 
CS6 Book for Digital 
Photographers Team 

CREATIVE DIRECTOR 

Felix Nelson 

TECHNICAL EDITORS 

Kim Doty 
Cindy Snyder 

TRAFFIC DIRECTOR 

Kim Gabriel 

PRODUCTION MANAGER 

Dave Damstra 

ART DIRECTOR 

Jessica Maldonado 

COVER PHOTOS BY 

Scott Kelby 



Published by 
New Riders 

©2013 by Scott Kelby 

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced or transmitted in any form 
or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, or by any 
information storage and retrieval system, without written permission from the publisher, 
except for the inclusion of brief quotations in a review. 

Composed in Avenir, Myriad Pro, and Helvetica by Kelby Media Group, Inc. 

Trademarks 

All terms mentioned in this book that are known to be trademarks or service marks have 
been appropriately capitalized. New Riders cannot attest to the accuracy of this information. 
Use of a term in this book should not be regarded as affecting the validity of any trademark 
or service mark. 

Photoshop is a registered trademark of Adobe Systems, Inc. 
Macintosh is a registered trademark of Apple, Inc. 
Windows is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corp. 

Warning and Disclaimer 

This book is designed to provide information about Photoshop for digital photographers. 
Every effort has been made to make this book as complete and as accurate as possible, but 
no warranty of fitness is implied. 

The information is provided on an as-is basis. The author and New Riders shall have neither 
the liability nor responsibility to any person or entity with respect to any loss or damages 
arising from the information contained in this book or from the use of the discs, electronic 
files, or programs that may accompany it. 

THIS PRODUCT IS NOT ENDORSED OR SPONSORED BY ADOBE SYSTEMS 
INCORPORATED, PUBLISHER OF ADOBE PHOTOSHOP CS6. 

ISBN 13:978-0-321-82374-8 
ISBN 10: 0-321-82374-5 

987654321 



http://kelbytraining.com 
www.newriders.com 



© Ibymedia 

^^^^ GROUP INC 



This book is dedicated to the coolest six-year-old ever: 

my amazing, hilarious, smart, adorable, loving daughter Kira. 

You are a clone of your mom and that's the best thing 

I could ever wish for you. Daddy loves you very much!!! 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 



I've been writing books for 14 years now, and I still find that the thing that's the hardest for me to write in any book is 
writing the acknowledgments. It also, hands down, takes me longer than any other pages in the book. For me, I think the 
reason I take these acknowledgments so seriously is because it's when I get to put down on paper how truly grateful I am 
to be surrounded by such great friends, an incredible book team, and a family that truly makes my life a joy. That's why it's 
so hard. I also know why it takes so long — you type a lot slower with tears in your eyes. 

To my remarkable wife, Kalebra: We've been married nearly 23 years now, and you still continue to amaze me, and everyone 
around you. I've never met anyone more compassionate, more loving, more hilarious, and more genuinely beautiful, and I'm 
so blessed to be going through life with you, to have you as the mother of my children, my business partner, my private pilot, 
Chinese translator, and best friend. You truly are the type of woman love songs are written for, and as anyone who knows me 
will tell you, I am, without a doubt, the luckiest man alive to have you for my wife. 

To my son, Jordan: It's every dad's dream to have a relationship with his son like I have with you, and I'm so proud of the 
bright, caring, creative young man you've become. I can't wait to see the amazing things life has in store for you, and I just 
want you to know that watching you grow into the person you are is one of my life's greatest joys. 

To my precious little girl, Kira: You have been blessed in a very special way, because you are a little clone of your mom, which 
is the most wonderful thing I could have possibly wished for you. I see all her gifts reflected in your eyes, and though you're 
still too young to have any idea how blessed you are to have Kalebra as your mom, one day — just like Jordan — you will. 

To my big brother Jeff, who has always been, and will always be, a hero to me. So much of who I am, and where I am, is 
because of your influence, guidance, caring, and love as I was growing up. Thank you for teaching me to always take the 
high road, for always knowing the right thing to say at the right time, and for having so much of our dad in you. 

I'm incredibly fortunate to have part of the production of my books handled in-house by my own book team at Kelby Media 
Group, which is led by my friend and longtime Creative Director, Felix Nelson, who is hands down the most creative person 
I've ever met. He's surrounded by some of the most talented, amazing, ambitious, gifted, and downright brilliant people I've 
ever had the honor of working with, and thank God he had the foresight to hire Kim Doty, my Editor, and the only reason 
why I haven't totally fallen onto the floor in the fetal position after writing both a Lightroom 4 book and a CS6 book, back 
to back. Kim is just an incredibly organized, upbeat, focused person who keeps me calm and on track, and no matter how 
tough the task ahead is, she always says the same thing, "Ah, piece of cake," and she convinces you that you can do it, and 
then you do it. I cannot begin to tell you how grateful I am to her for being my Editor, and to Felix for finding her. I guess 
great people just attract other great people. 

Working with Kim is Cindy Snyder, who relentlessly tests all the stuff I write to make sure I didn't leave anything out, so you'll 
all be able to do the things I'm teaching (which with a Photoshop book is an absolute necessity). She's like a steel trap that 
nothing can get through if it doesn't work just like I said it would. 



IV 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



http://kelbytraining.com 



The look of the book comes from an amazing designer, a creative powerhouse, and someone whom I feel very, very lucky 
to have designing my books — Jessica Maldonado. She always adds that little something that just takes it up a notch, and 
I've built up such a trust for her ideas and intuition, which I why I just let her do her thing. Thanks Jess! 

I owe a huge debt of gratitude to my Executive Assistant and Chief Wonder Woman, Kathy Siler. She runs a whole side of my 
business life, and a big chunk of our conferences, and she does it so I have time to write books, spend time with my family, 
and have a life outside of work. She's such an important part of what I do that I don't know how I did anything without her. 
Thank you, thank you, thank you. It means more than you know. 

To my best buddy and book-publishing powerhouse, Dave Moser (also known as "the guiding light, force of nature, 
miracle birth, etc."), for always insisting that we raise the bar and make everything we do better than anything we've 
done before. 

Thanks to everyone at New Riders and Peachpit, and in particular to my way cool Editor, Ted Waitt (who is one heck of a 
photographer and a vitally important part of everything I do in "Bookland"), my wonderful Publisher Nancy Aldrich-Ruenzel, 
marketing maven Scott Cowlin, marketing diva Sara Jane Todd, and the entire team at Pearson Education who go out of 
their way to make sure that we're always working in the best interest of my readers, that we're always trying to take things 
up a notch, and who work hard to make sure my work gets in as many people's hands as possible. 

Thanks to my friends at Adobe: Bryan O'Neil Hughes, John Nack, Mala Sharma, Terry White, Cari Gushiken, Julieanne 
Kost, Tom Hogarty, Scott Morris, Russell Preston Brown, and the amazing engineering team at Adobe (I don't know how 
you all do it). Gone but not forgotten: Barbara Rice, Jill Nakashima, Rye Livingston, Addy Roff, Bryan Lamkin, Jennifer 
Stern, Deb Whitman, Kevin Connor, John Loiacono, and Karen Gauthier. 

Thanks to Matt Kloskowski for all his input and ideas for this edition of the book. I'm very grateful to have his advice, and his 
friendship. I want to thank all the talented and gifted photographers who've taught me so much over the years, including: 
Moose Peterson, Joe McNally, Anne Cahill, Vincent Versace, Cliff Mautner, Dave Black, Bill Fortney, David Ziser, Helene 
Glassman, Kevin Ames, and Jim DiVitale. 

Thanks to my mentors, whose wisdom and whip-cracking have helped me immeasurably, including John Graden, Jack Lee, 
Dave Gales, Judy Farmer, and Douglas Poole. 

Most importantly, I want to thank God, and His Son Jesus Christ, for leading me to the woman of my dreams, for blessing 
us with two amazing children, for allowing me to make a living doing something I truly love, for always being there when 
I need Him, for blessing me with a wonderful, fulfilling, and happy life, and such a warm, loving family to share it with. 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



OTHER BOOKS BY SCOTT KELBY 



Professional Portrait Retouching Techniques for Photographers Using Photoshop 

The Digital Photography Book, parts 1, 2, 3, and 4 

Light It, Shoot It, Retouch It: Learn Step by Step How to Go from 
Empty Studio to Finished Image 

Scott Kelby's 7 -Point System for Adobe Photoshop CS3 

The iPhone Book 

The Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 4 Book for Digital Photographers 

Photoshop Down & Dirty Tricks 

The Photoshop Elements Book for Digital Photographers 

Photo Recipes Live: Behind the Scenes: Your Guide to Today's 
Most Popular Lighting Techniques, parts 1 & 2 



VI 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



ABOUT THE AUTHOR 




Scott is Editor, Publisher, and co-founder of Photoshop User magazine, Executive Editor 
and Publisher of Light It (the how-to magazine for studio lighting and off-camera flash), 
and is host of The Grid, the weekly live videocast talk show for photographers, as well 
as co-host of the top-rated weekly videocast series, Photoshop User TV. 

He is President of the National Association of Photoshop Professionals (NAPP), the 
trade association for Adobe® Photoshop® users, and he's President of the training, 
education, and publishing firm, Kelby Media Group, Inc. 

Scott Kelbv Scott is a photographer, designer, and award-winning author of more than 50 books, in- 

cluding The Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 4 Book for Digital Photographers, Professional 
Portrait Retouching Techniques for Photographers Using Photoshop, Light It, Shoot It, 
Retouch It: Learn Step by Step How to Go from Empty Studio to Finished Image, The 
iPhone Book, The iPod Book, and The Digital Photography Book, parts 1, 2, 3 & 4. 

For the past two years, Scott has been honored with the distinction of being the world's 
#1 best-selling author of photography books. His book, The Digital Photography Book, 
vol. 1, is now the best-selling book on digital photography in history. 

His books have been translated into dozens of different languages, including Chinese, 
Russian, Spanish, Korean, Polish, Taiwanese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Dutch, 
Swedish, Turkish, and Portuguese, among others, and he is a recipient of the prestigious 
ASP International Award, presented annually by the American Society of Photographers 
for "...contributions in a special or significant way to the ideals of Professional Photog- 
raphy as an art and a science." 

Scott is Training Director for the Adobe Photoshop Seminar Tour and Conference Tech- 
nical Chair for the Photoshop World Conference & Expo. He's featured in a series of 
Adobe Photoshop training DVDs and online courses at KelbyTraining.com and has been 
training Adobe Photoshop users since 1993. 

For more information on Scott, visit him at: 

His daily blog: http://scottkelby.com 
Google+: Scottgplus.com 
Twitter: http://twitter.com@scottkelby 
Facebook: www.facebook.com/skelby 



www.kelbytraining.com 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



CONTENTS 




CHAPTER 1 1 

Mini Series 

Using Photoshop CS6's Mini Bridge 

Getting to Your Photos Using Mini Bridge 2 

Viewing Your Photos in Mini Bridge 4 

Use Full-Screen Review Mode to Find 

Your Best Shots Fast 6 

Sorting and Arranging Your Photos 8 

Finding Your Photos by Searching 12 

Photoshop Killer Tips 14 

CHAPTER 2 17 

WWF Raw 

The Essentials of Camera Raw 

Working with Camera Raw 18 

For CS4/CS5 Users Only: Understanding CS6's 

New Camera Raw Sliders 21 

Updating to the Latest Camera Raw Editing Features 

(Not for New Users) 22 

Miss the JPEG Look? Try Applying a Camera Profile 24 

The Essential Adjustments: White Balance 26 

The Essential Adjustments #2: Exposure 30 

Letting Camera Raw Auto-Correct Your Photos 35 

Adding Punch to Your Images with Clarity 36 

Adjusting Contrast Using Curves 38 

Cropping and Straightening 44 

Photoshop Killer Tips 48 

CHAPTER 3 51 

Raw Justice 

Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 

Double-Processing to Create the Uncapturable 52 

Editing Multiple Photos at Once 58 

Sharpening in Camera Raw 61 

Automatically Fixing Lens Problems 66 

Fixing Chromatic Aberrations 

(That Colored-Edge Fringe) 74 

Edge Vignetting: How to Fix It and 

How to Add It for Effect 76 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS( 



for Digital Photographer: 



CONTENTS 



http://kelbytraining.com 



The Advantages of Adobe's DNG Format for RAW Photos 80 

Adjusting or Changing Ranges of Color 82 

Removing Spots, Specks, Blemishes, Etc 84 

Calibrating for Your Particular Camera 87 

Reducing Noise in Noisy Photos 88 

Setting Your Resolution, Image Size, 

Color Space, and Bit Depth 91 

Getting the Old CS5-Style Fill Light Slider Back 94 

Photoshop Killer Tips 96 

CHAPTER 4 99 

Attitude Adjustment 
Camera Raw's Adjustment Tools 

Dodging, Burning, and Adjusting 

Individual Areas of Your Photo 100 

Retouching Portraits in Camera Raw 106 

Fixing Skies (and Other Stuff) with the Graduated Filter 109 

Special Effects Using Camera Raw 111 

Fixing Color Problems (or Adding Effects) by 
"Painting" White Balance 115 

Reducing Noise in Just the Shadow Areas 116 

How to Get More Than 1 00% Out of Any 

Adjustment Brush Effect 117 

Photoshop Killer Tips 118 

CHAPTER 5 121 

Scream of the Crop 

How to Resize and Crop Photos 

Basic Cropping for Photos 122 

Cropping to a Specific Size 128 

Creating Your Own Custom Crop Tools 130 

Custom Sizes for Photographers 132 

Resizing Digital Camera Photos 134 

Automated Saving and Resizing 137 

Resizing for Poster-Sized Prints 139 

Straightening Crooked Photos 141 

Making Your Photos Smaller (Downsizing) 143 

Resizing Just Parts of Your Image Using 

Content-Aware Scaling 146 

Photoshop Killer Tips 149 








The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



CONTENTS 




CHAPTER 6 153 

Black & White 

How to Create Stunning B&W Images 

Converting to Black and White 

Using Camera Raw 154 

My Three-Click Method for Converting to B&W 

(Once You're Already in Photoshop) 158 

Split Toning 162 

Duotones Made Crazy Easy 164 

Quadtoning for Richer B&Ws 165 

Creating Your Own One-Click Presets 

in Camera Raw 167 

If You're Really, Really Serious About B&W, 

Then Consider This Instead 168 

Photoshop Killer Tips 169 



CHAPTER 7 171 

We Are HDR 
Creating HDR Images 

Setting Up Your Camera to Shoot HDR 172 

Scott's "Down & Dirty" HDR Workflow 

(Six Clicks to Done!) 175 

Working with HDR Pro in 

Photoshop CS6 179 

Creating Photorealistic 

HDR Images 187 

High Pass Sharpening for 

HDR Images 189 

Getting the HDR Look on 

a Single Image 192 

Dealing with Ghosting in 

Merge to HDR Pro 196 

Creating a Blended HDR 198 

HDR Finishing Techniques 

(Vignetting & Soft Glow) 206 

Photoshop Killer Tips 208 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS( 



for Digital Photographer: 



CONTENTS 



http://kelbytraining.com 



CHAPTER 8 211 

Little Problems 

Fixing Common Problems 

When Your Subject Is in the Shadows 212 

Fixing Shots with a Dull Gray Sky 215 

Using the Dodge and Burn Tools 219 

Fixing Reflections in Glasses 223 

Fixing Group Shots the Easy Way 228 

Making Really Tricky Selections, Like Hair 

(and Some Cool Compositing Tricks, Too!) 231 

Fixing Really Messed Up Wide-Angle Shots 241 

Fixing Problems Caused by Your Camera's Lens 248 

Stretching Stuff to Fit Using Content-Aware Scale 253 

Removing Stuff Using Content-Aware Fill 258 

Moving Stuff Without Leaving a Hole 

by Using Content-Aware Move 264 

Photoshop Killer Tips 266 



CHAPTER 9 269 

Side Effects 

Special Effects for Photographers 

Trendy Desaturated Skin Look 270 

High-Contrast Portrait Look 272 

Getting the Grungy, High-Contrast Look 

Within Camera Raw 276 

Dreamy Focus Effect for People and Landscapes 278 

Getting the Instagram Look 280 

Panoramas Made Crazy Easy 284 

Turning a Photo into an Oil Painting in One Click 290 

Tilt Shift Effect (Using the New Blur Gallery) 295 

Iris & Field Blur (or How to Fake the 85mm f/1.4 Look) 299 

Creating Dramatic Lighting 305 

Photo Toning Effects 311 

Color Lookup Effects 314 

Sculpting Using the Updated Liquify Filter 316 

Night Lights Background Effect 320 

Photoshop Killer Tips 324 




The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



CONTENTS 




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CHAPTER 10 327 

Sharpen Your Teeth 

Sharpening Techniques 

Sharpening Essentials 328 

Luminosity Sharpening 335 

The Most Advanced Sharpening 

in Photoshop 342 

When to Use the Smart Sharpen 

Filter Instead 344 

High Pass Sharpening 347 

Output Sharpening in Camera Raw 349 

Photoshop Killer Tips 350 



CHAPTER 11 353 

Fine Print 

Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management 

Setting Up Your Camera's Color Space 354 

Resolution for Printing 355 

Setting Up Photoshop's Color Space 356 

Sharpening for Printing 359 

Sending Your Images to Be Printed at 

a Photo Lab 360 

You Have to Calibrate Your Monitor 

Before You Go Any Further 361 

The Other Secret to Getting Pro-Quality 

Prints That Match Your Screen 364 

Making the Print (Finally, It All Comes Together) 368 

Soft Proofing in Photoshop 374 

What to Do If the Print Still Doesn't 

Match Your Screen 375 

Making Contact Sheets (Yup, It's Back!) 377 

Photoshop Killer Tips 379 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



CONTENTS 



http://kelbytraining.com 



CHAPTER 12 381 

Videodrome 

Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 

Four Things You'll Want to Know Now 

About Creating Video in Photoshop CS6 382 

Opening Your Video Clips into Photoshop 384 

Your Basic Controls for Working with Video 386 

Editing (Trimming) Your Clips 390 

Working with Audio and Background Music 392 

Adding Transitions Between Clips and 

Fade Ins/Fade Outs 396 

Creating Lower Thirds (or Adding Logos) 398 

Applying Photoshop Filters and Adjustments 402 

Titles and Working with Text 406 

Using Blend Modes to Create "Looks" 411 

Our Start-to-Finish Project 413 

Photoshop Killer Tips 423 



CHAPTER 13 

Workflow 

My Step-by-Step Workflow 

My Photoshop CS6 

Digital Photography Workflow. . . 



427 



.428 



INDEX 



437 





The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Seven Things 

You'll Wish You 

Had Known Before 

Reading This Book 



It's really important to me that you get a lot out of reading this book, and one 
way I can help is to get you to read these seven quick things about the book that 
you'll wish later you knew now. For example, it's here that I tell you about where 
to download something important, and if you skip over this, eventually you'll send 
me an email asking where it is, but by then you'll be really aggravated, and well... 
it's gonna get ugly. We can skip all that (and more), if you take two minutes now 
and read these seven quick things. I promise to make it worth your while. 



(1) You don't have to read 
this book in order. 

I designed this book so you can turn right 

to the technique you want to learn, and 

start there. I explain everything as I go, 

step-by-step, so if you want to learn how 

to remove dust spots from a RAW image, 

just turn to page 84, and in a couple of 

minutes, you'll know. I did write the book 

in a logical order for learning CS6, but 

don't let that tie your hands — jump right 

to whatever technique you want to learn — 

you can always go back, review, and try 

other stuff. 



(2) Practice along with the same 
photos I used here in the book. 

As you're going through the book, and 
you come to a technique like "Working 
with HDR Pro in Photoshop CS6," you 
might not have an HDR-bracketed set 
of shots hanging around, so in those 
cases I usually made the images available 
for you to download, so you can follow 
along with the book. You can find them 
at http://kelbytraining.com/books/cs6 
(see, this is one of those things I was talk- 
ing about that you'd miss if you skipped 
this and went right to Chapter 1). 





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Digital Photographers 



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► XIV 



The Adobe Photoshop CS6 Book for Digital Photographers 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



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(3) The intro pages at the beginning 
of each chapter are not what 
they seem. 

The chapter introductions are designed to 
give you a quick mental break between 
chapters, and honestly, they have little to 
do with what's in the chapter. In fact, they 
have little to do with anything, but writing 
these quirky chapter intros has become 
kind of a tradition of mine (I do this in all 
my books), so if you're one of those really 
"serious" types, I'm begging you — skip 
them and just go right into the chapter 
because they'll just get on your nerves. 
However, the short intros at the beginning 
of each individual project, up at the top of 
the page, are usually pretty important. If 
you skip over them, you might wind up 
missing stuff that isn't mentioned in the 
project itself. So, if you find yourself work- 
ing on a project, and you're thinking to 
yourself, "Why are we doing this?" it's 
probably because you skipped over that 
intro. So, just make sure you read it first, 
and then go to Step One. It'll make a 
difference — I promise. 



(4) There are things in Photoshop 
CS6 and in Camera Raw that 
do the exact same thing. 

For example, there's a Lens Corrections 
panel in Camera Raw, and there's a Lens 
Correction filter in Photoshop, and they 
are almost identical. What this means to 
you is that some things are covered twice 
in the book. As you go through the book, 
and you start to think, "This sounds fa- 
miliar...," now you know why. By the way, 
in my own workflow, if I can do the exact 
same task in Camera Raw or Photoshop, 
I always choose to do it in Camera Raw, 
because it's faster (there are no progress 
bars in Camera Raw) and it's non-destruc- 
tive (so I can always change my mind later). 

(Continued) 



The Adobe Photoshop CS6 Book for Digital Photographers xv i 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



(5) I included a chapter on my CS6 
workflow, but don't read it yet. 

At the end of this book I included a 
special chapter detailing my own CS6 
workflow, but please don't read it until 
you've read the rest of the book, because 
it assumes that you've read the book al- 
ready, and understand the basic concepts, 
so it doesn't spell everything out (or it 
would be one really, really long drawn- 
out chapter). 



(6) Where's the Bridge stuff? 

A version of Bridge is built right into 
Photoshop itself. It's called "Mini Bridge" 
(I am not making this up), and it does 
about 85% of what "Big Bridge" does 
(Adobe doesn't call it Big Bridge, they call 
it Adobe Bridge). This is great because 
now you don't have to leave Photoshop 
and jump to a separate application for 
finding and working with your images. So, 
since Mini Bridge is part of CS6, I start 
the book with a chapter on Mini Bridge. 
So, what did Adobe add to Big Bridge in 
CS6? Well, barely anything (which gives 
you some hint as to the future of Bridge, 
eh?). Anyway, they did greatly improve 
and streamline Mini Bridge, but since 
some of you may still be using Big Bridge 
for at least a little while longer (at least 
until you fall in love with Mini Bridge), I 
did update two Big Bridge chapters, and 
put them on the web for you to down- 
load free. You'll find these at http:// 
kelbytraining.com/books/cs6. 



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(7) Photography is evolving, Photo- 
shop is evolving, and this book 
has to, too. 

This is the first edition of this book that 
doesn't include a chapter on using Curves, 
and that's because today we use a differ- 
ent tool — Camera Raw (even if we don't 
shoot in RAW, because it works for JPEGs 
and TIFFs, too!). I spent years teaching 
Curves in books and in podcasts and 
here in this book, but honestly, today 
I really don't use Curves (and if I do, I use 
the Tone Curve in Camera Raw, which I 
do cover here in the book). In fact, I had 
a hard time finding any photographers 
I know still using Curves, which just shows 
how Photoshop has evolved over time. 
Although Curves isn't covered here in 
the book, I did provide a color correction 
chapter using Curves on the book's down- 
loads page (ya know, just in case you want 
to go "old school"). You can find it at the 
web address just mentioned in #6. 

(8) Each chapter includes my 
"Photoshop Killer Tips"! 

Hey, I thought you said it was "Seven 
Things"? Well, consider this eighth a 
"bonus thing," because it's about another 
bonus I included in this CS6 edition of 
the book. At the end of every chapter is 
a special section I call "Photoshop Killer 
Tips" (named after the book of the same 
name I did a few years ago with Felix 
Nelson). These are those time-saving, 
job-saving, "man, I wish I had known that 
sooner" type tips. The ones that make 
you smile, nod, and then want to call all 
your friends and "tune them up" with your 
new status as Photoshop guru. These are 
in addition to all the other tips, which 
already appear throughout the chapters 
(you can never have enough tips, right? 
Remember: He who dies with the most 
tips, wins!). So, there you have it, seven (or 
so) things that you're now probably glad 
you took a couple minutes to read. Okay, 
the easy part is over — turn the page and 
let's get to work. 



The Adobe Photoshop CS6 Book for Digital Photographers 



XVII i 




Photo by Scott Kelby Exposure: 1/125 sec | Focal Length: 24 mm | Aperture Value: //14 



Chapter 1 Using Photoshop CS6's Mini Bridge 




Mini Series 

using photoshop CS6 / s mini bridge 



If you're reading this chapter opener (and you are, by the 
way), it's safe to assume that you already read the warning 
about these openers in the introduction to the book (by the 
way, nobody reads that, so if you did, you get 500 bonus 
points, and a chance to play later in our lightning round). 
Anyway, if you read that and you're here now, you must be 
okay with reading these, knowing full well in advance that 
these have little instructional (or literary) value of any kind. 
Now, once you turn the page, I turn all serious on you, and 
the fun and games are over, and it's just you and me, and 
most of the time I'll be screaming at you (stuff like, "No, 
no — that's too much sharpening you goober!" and "Are 
you kidding me? You call that a Curves adjustment?" and 
"Who spilled my mocha Frappuccino?" and stuff like that), 
so although we're all friendly now, that all ends when you 
turn the page, because then we're down to business. 



That's why, if you're a meany Mr. Frumpypants type who 
feels that joking has no place in a serious book of learning 
like this, then you can: (a) turn the page and get to the 
discipline and order you crave, or (b) if you're not sure, 
you can take this quick quiz that will help you determine 
the early warning signs of someone who should skip all 
the rest of the chapter openers and focus on the "real" 
learning (and yelling). Question #1: When was the last 
time you used the word "poopy" in a sentence when not 
directly addressing or referring to a toddler? Was it: 
(a) During a morning HR meeting? (b) During a legal 
deposition? (c) During your wedding vows? Or, (d) you 
haven't said that word in a meaningful way since you 
were three. If you even attempted to answer this question, 
you're clear to read the rest of the chapter openers. 
Oh, by the way: pee pee. (Hee hee!) 



001 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Getting to 

Your Photos 

Using Mini Bridge 



Way back in Photoshop 7, we had a feature I loved called the File Browser, which let 
you access your images from right within Photoshop. Well, when Photoshop CS came 
along, they took the File Browser away and gave us the more powerful Adobe Bridge. 
I loved that it was more powerful, but I hated that it was a totally separate program, 
and now I had to leave Photoshop to get to my images. Thankfully, in Photoshop CS5, 
they added Mini Bridge, and in CS6, it's faster, easier to use, and so convenient that 
in most cases we don't have to leave Photoshop (wild cheers ensue!). 



Step One: 

By default, Mini Bridge lives at the bot- 
tom of Photoshop's workspace, and to 
make it visible, you just click directly on 
its tab and it pops right up (as seen here). 
When it appears, click on the Launch 
Bridge button, and it launches "Big 
Bridge" (what I call the full-sized Adobe 
Bridge) in the background (you won't 
see it, but Mini Bridge actually needs 
Big Bridge open to do its thing, but 
again, this happens in the background, 
so you won't actually see it at all). By the 
way, if you already have Big Bridge open, 
of course you won't see a button asking 
you to launch it. 



Step Two: 

Once Big Bridge launches in the 
background, Mini Bridge comes alive, 
displaying your images in a horizontal 
filmstrip layout (as seen here). On the 
left side of the panel is the Navigation 
pod, which is where you navigate to 
the photos you want to appear in Mini 
Bridge. There's a pop-up menu at the 
top to help you make your way to the 
photos on your computer (or even ones 
on your memory card, if it's connected 
to your computer). Here, I chose my 
Pictures folder, and below the pop-up 
menu, it lists the folders I have inside 
that folder. To see what's inside any of 
the folders, you just double-click on one. 






=. > > x > ■ . > - fa | 

rTTTTTTs 



► 002 Chapter 1 Using Photoshop CS6's Mini Bridge 



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: 





Step Three: 

My favorite way to navigate is to use 
the new pop-up menus that appear right 
above the filmstrip itself — these make 
getting right to the folder you want re- 
ally quick and easy. That area above the 
thumbnail filmstrip gives you a "bread- 
crumb trail" showing the path to the 
folder that is currently displayed in Mini 
Bridge (Adobe calls this the "Path Bar"). 
If you click on the little right-facing arrow 
to the right of each folder in the Path Bar, 
a pop-up menu appears with a list of the 
subfolders inside that folder. To display 
what's in one of those folders, just choose 
it from the pop-up menu (as shown here). 
Once you try this a few times, you'll love 
how quickly you can drill down to find 
the photos you want to work on. By the 
way (and this may seem insanely obvious, 
but...), to open any of these images in 
Photoshop, just double-click on one. 



Step Four: 

To change the size of the thumbnails 
when Mini Bridge is docked to the bot- 
tom of the screen, you just change the 
size of the Mini Bridge panel itself. Click- 
and-drag the top of the panel upward 
and, as you do, the thumbnails grow to 
fill in the space (as seen here). 



TIP: Learning More About 
Big Bridge 

If you want to learn more about Big 
Bridge, make sure you download the 
two free bonus chapters I posted on the 
book's download website, mentioned in 
the introduction of this book. 



Using Photoshop CS6's Mini Bridge Chapter 1 003 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Viewing Your Photos 
in Mini Bridge 



Okay, now that you've found Mini Bridge, let's put it to work and find out which 
style of Mini Bridge works best for your workflow (luckily, you get to set it up 
the way you like it), and how to use it quickly to find and view your images. 



Step One: 

By default, Mini Bridge is set up in a 
wide filmstrip layout, and is docked to 
the bottom of your screen, like the one 
you see here. However, you can undock 
it and have it work like any other floating 
panel in Photoshop. 



Step Two: 

To undock Mini Bridge, click-and-drag its 
tab up toward the center of Photoshop's 
image area, and it becomes a floating 
panel with multiple columns and rows 
(as seen here). Doing this also reveals a 
thumbnail size slider in the bottom-right 
corner of the Mini Bridge panel (shown 
circled here in red). Also, once you've 
found the images you want to work with, 
you can hide the Navigation pod along 
the left side (so you can see more of the 
thumbnails) by clicking on the panel's 
flyout menu in its upper-right corner 
and choosing Hide Navigation Pod. 



". 














Mmaii | f, f | ", | 




► 004 Chapter 1 Using Photoshop CS6's Mini Bridge 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 













Step Three: 

If you don't want Mini Bridge docked to 
the bottom of your screen, or floating 
around untethered, then you can dock 
it to your right side panels, which gives 
you a vertical filmstrip layout, and now 
you can show/hide it by clicking on its 
icon (as shown here). Again, if you want 
your thumbnails bigger, you have to drag 
the left side of Mini Bridge out to the 
left, and as it gets wider, the thumbnails 
grow to fill in the space. Technically, you 
could "nest" it with your other panels, like 
the Layers panel or the Color panel, but 
then its size would be really constricted 
by those other panels (drag its tab over 
next to the Layers tab and you'll see what 
I mean), so it's really better off positioned 
like you see here, so it kind of pops-out 
to the left. 



Step Four: 

To view any of these thumbnails much 
larger, you don't have to resize Mini Bridge. 
Instead, you can get an instant full-screen 
preview by clicking on a thumbnail, and 
then pressing the Spacebar on your key- 
board. That image goes full screen (as 
shown here), so you can get a good look 
at it. To see the next image in the filmstrip, 
just press the Right Arrow key on your 
keyboard (and, of course, to go to a previ- 
ous image, use the Left Arrow key). When 
you're done seeing this full-screen preview, 
you can either press the Spacebar again, 
or press the Esc key on your keyboard. 



Using Photoshop CS6's Mini Bridge Chapter 1 005 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Use Full-Screen 

Review Mode 

to Find Your 

Best Shots Fast 



One of my favorite features of Mini Bridge is Review mode, because this is where Mini Bridge 
really feels big! By making your images much larger onscreen, it makes it much easier to find 
your best shots, and Review mode really makes whittling things down to just the best shots 
from your shoot so much easier. 



Step One: 

To see the images in Mini Bridge in 
Review mode, make sure either no images 
are selected or all the images you want to 
see are selected (by Command-clicking 
[PC: Ctrl-clicking] on them), then choose 
Review Mode from the View icon's pop- 
up menu at the top left of the panel (as 
shown here). By the way, if you have less 
than four images, it doesn't go into the 
full carousel slide show version of Review 
mode like you see in the next step — it 
just puts the four in Full Screen Preview 
mode (yawn). 



Step Two: 

When you choose Review Mode, it enters 
a full-screen view with your images in a 
cool carousel-like rotation (as seen here). 
This mode is great for two big reasons: 
The first being it makes a really nice on- 
screen slide show presentation. You can 
use the Left and Right Arrow keys on 
your keyboard to move through the pho- 
tos or the arrow buttons in the lower-left 
corner of the screen (as a photo comes to 
the front, it becomes larger and brighter). 
If you want to open the image in front in 
Photoshop, press the letter O. To open 
the front photo in Adobe Camera Raw, 
press R. To open all your images in Cam- 
era Raw, press Option-R (PC: Alt-R). 
To leave Review mode, press the Esc 
key. If you forget any of these shortcuts, 
just press H. 




► 006 Chapter 1 Using Photoshop CS6's Mini Bridge 



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: 





Step Three: 

The second reason to use Review mode 
is to help you narrow things down to just 
your best photos from a shoot. Here's 
how: Let's say you have five or six simi- 
lar photos, or photos of a similar subject 
(in this case, a football player), and you 
want to find the single best one out of 
those. Start by Command-clicking (PC: 
Ctrl-clicking) on just those photos (in the 
filmstrip) to select them, and enter Review 
mode. As you move through the photos 
(using the Left and Right Arrow keys on 
your keyboard), and you see one come to 
the front that's not going to make the cut, 
just press the Down Arrow key on your 
keyboard (or click the Down Arrow but- 
ton onscreen) and that photo is removed 
from the screen. Keep doing this until 
you've narrowed things down to just 
the final image. 



Step Four: 

Like I mentioned, once you fall below 
five images, you no longer get the car- 
ousel view. Instead, it looks more like 
regular Full Screen Preview mode — it's 
just full screen (as seen here). In Review 
mode, you can zoom in tight on a parti- 
cular area using the built-in Loupe. Just 
move your cursor over the part of the 
photo you want a closer look at, and 
click to bring up the Loupe for that photo 
(as shown here, in the image in the top 
right). To move it, click-and-hold inside 
the Loupe and drag it where you want 
it. To make it go away, just click once in- 
side it. Once you've whittled things down 
to just your keepers, you can give each a 
star rating (like a 5-star rating by pressing 
Command-5 [PC: Ctrl-5]) — more on this 
on the next page. 



Using Photoshop CS6's Mini Bridge Chapter 1 007 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Sorting and 

Arranging 

Your Photos 



Ah, finally we get to the fun part — sorting your photos. We generally always have 
the same goal here: quickly finding out which are the best shots from your shoot 
(the keepers), marking them as your best shots, and then separating those from the 
rest, so they're just one click away when you need them. That way, you can view 
them as slide shows, post them on the web, send them to a client for proofing, or 
prepare them for printing. 



Step One: 

When you view your images in Mini 
Bridge, by default, they're sorted manu- 
ally by filename, so it's pretty likely that 
the first photo you shot will appear in 
the left end of the filmstrip. I say it's 
"pretty likely" because there are excep- 
tions (if you did multiple shoots on 
different cameras, or shot on different 
memory cards, etc.), but most likely 
they'll appear first one shot first. If you 
want to change how they are sorted, 
click on the Sort icon (it looks like up 
and down arrows) near the left end of 
the Toolbar, and a pop-up menu of 
options will appear (as seen here). 



Step Two: 

Let's start by quickly rating our photos 
to separate the keepers from the rest of 
the bunch. First, I switch to a view mode 
that's better for decision making, like Full 
Screen Preview mode (select any photo 
and then press the Spacebar) or Review 
mode (we just went through this). Now, 
use the Left and Right Arrow keys on 
your keyboard to move through the full- 
screen images. 





► 008 Chapter 1 Using Photoshop CS6's Mini Bridge 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



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: 





Step Three: 

Probably the most popular method 
for sorting your images is to rate them 
using Mini Bridge's 1- to 5-star rating 
system (with 5 being your best images). 
That being said, I'm going to try to con- 
vince you to try a rating system that is 
faster and more efficient. Let's start by 
finding the bad ones. When you see a 
photo that is really bad (way out of focus, 
the flash didn't fire, the subject's eyes 
are closed, etc.), press Option-Delete 
(PC: Alt-Delete) to mark that photo as a 
Reject. The word Reject appears in red 
in the bottom-left after you do this in Full 
Screen Preview mode, below the photo in 
Review mode, and below the thumbnail, 
as well (shown circled here in red), if you 
choose Labels and Ratings, under Show 
in the View icon's pop-up menu. It doesn't 
delete them; it just marks 'em as Rejects. 
Note: Mini Bridge displays your Rejects 
right alongside your other photos, but if 
you don't want to see your Rejects, you 
can hide them by going under the View 
icon's pop-up menu and choosing Show 
Reject Files (as shown here). 



Step Four: 

When you see a "keeper" (a shot you 
may want to print, or show to the client, 
etc.), then you'll press Command-5 (PC: 
Ctrl-5) to mark that photo as a 5-star 
image, and this star rating will appear 
below the selected photo (shown circled 
here in red). So that's the drill — move 
through your photos and when you see 
a real keeper, press Command-5, and 
when you see a totally messed up photo, 
press Option-Delete to mark it as a Re- 
ject. For all the rest of the photos, you 
do absolutely nothing. So, why not use 
the entire star rating system? Because it 
takes way, way too long (I'll explain why 
on the next page). 

(Continued) 



Using Photoshop CS6's Mini Bridge Chapter 1 009 i 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

Here's why I don't recommend using the 
entire star rating system: What are you 
going to do with your 2-star images? 
They're not bad enough to delete, so we 
keep 'em, right? What about your 3-star 
ones? The client won't see these either, 
but we keep 'em. What about your 4-star 
photos (the ones that weren't quite good 
enough to be five stars)? We keep them, 
too. See where I'm going? Why waste 
your valuable time deciding if a photo 
is a 2- or a 3- or a 4-star, if all you're go- 
ing to do is keep 'em anyway? The only 
shots we really care about are the ones 
we want off our computer (they're mess- 
ed up and just wasting disk space) and 
our best shots from that shoot. So, once 
you've gone through and ranked them, 
let's get rid of the dogs. Click-and-hold 
on the Filter Items by Rating icon at the 
right end of the Toolbar (it looks like 
a funnel) and choose Show Rejected 
Items Only (as shown here) to see just 
the Rejects. 



Step Six: 

Now, Command-click (PC: Ctrl-click) on 
all the Rejects, then press the Spacebar 
to open them in Full Screen Preview 
mode, and press Command-Delete 
(PC: Ctrl-Delete) on each one to move 
them to your Trash (PC: Recycle Bin). 
Next, go under the Filter Items by Rat- 
ing icon's pop-up menu again, but this 
time choose Show 5 Stars (as shown 
here) to filter things down so just your 
keepers — your 5-star images — are 
visible in Mini Bridge. 




Clear Fitter 

Keep Filter When Browsing 

fEMmSMM 

Show Unrated Items Only 

Show 1 Star 
Show 2 Stars 

Show 3 Stars 
Show 4 Stars 
Show 5 Stars 

Show 1 or More Stars 
Show 2 or More Stars 
Show 3 or More Stars 
Show 4 or More Stars 

Show 5 Stars 

Show Labeled Items Only 
Show Unlabeled Items Only 



Clear Filter 

Keep Filter When Browsing 

Show Rejected Items Only 
Show Unrated Items Only 




► 010 Chapter 1 Using Photoshop CS6's Mini Bridge 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



: 





Step Seven: 

At this point, we want to set things up so 
that, in the future, these 5-star photos are 
just one click away at any time, and we do 
that using collections (which are stored in 
Big Bridge). Here's how it works: Select 
all your 5-star photos, then enter Review 
mode. You'll see a button in the bottom- 
right corner (to the left of the X [Close] 
button, and shown circled here in red). 
Click it, and it brings up a dialog where 
you can name and save your images to a 
collection. Type in a name (I used "5-Star 
Planes") and click the Save button. 

TIP: Removing Ratings and 
Reject Labels 

To remove a photo's star rating, just click 
on the photo, then press Command-0 
(zero; PC: Ctrl-O). You can use the same 
shortcut to remove the Reject label. 



Step Eight: 

When you click that Save button, a 
collection of just these photos is saved. 
Now these best-of-that-shoot photos 
will always be just one click away. From 
the panel's flyout menu, choose Show 
Navigation Pod to make the Navigation 
pod visible again. Then, from the pop- 
up menu at the top of the pod, choose 
Collections, then click on the 5-Star 
Planes collection (as shown here), and 
just that shoot's 5-star photos appear. 



Using Photoshop CS6's Mini Bridge Chapter 1 01 1< 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Finding 

Your Photos 

by Searching 



Mini Bridge has a search function that lets you either use your computer's built-in 
search (like the Mac's Spotlight search or Windows Desktop Search), or you can use 
Mini Bridge's Advanced Search, which has searching power more like the one in Big 
Bridge. Here's how it works: 



Step One: 

At the top-right corner of the Mini Bridge 
panel is a search field. If you click on the 
little down-facing arrow in the field, you'll 
see that you have three different choices 
in the pop-up menu for how to search: 
(1) You can use your computer's built-in 
search to search your entire computer 
(which is surprisingly handy), or (2) just 
the current folder. Or, (3) you can use a 
standard Bridge search (which searches 
just the filename and any embedded key- 
words) to narrow things down in just your 
current folder. 

Step Two: 

Here, I typed in the keyword "Tires" 
and chose the basic Bridge search of 
the current folder, and Mini Bridge dis- 
played the results of this keyword search, 
which in this case was just three images 
with a clear view of a tire (as seen here). 
To leave the search results and return to 
your previous folder of images, just click 
the Back button (the left arrow) at the 
top-left corner of the Mini Bridge panel. 





► 012 Chapter 1 Using Photoshop CS6's Mini Bridge 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



: 



Find 



Source 



Look in: I Packard 



Criteria 



Exposure 



.'I - 



B^s°~ 



: © 



Results 



Match: If any criteria are met 



Ti 



Include All Subfolders 

H Include Non-indexed Files (may be slow) 



( Find \ ) C_£ 



ance-i 




Step Three: 

If you want more search control, then 
choose Search in Bridge from the search 
field's pop-up menu, and it brings up the 
Find dialog you see here in Big Bridge. 
You choose where it's going to search 
from the Source Look In pop-up menu 
up top (by default, it includes your Pic- 
tures folder, any favorite locations you've 
saved in Big Bridge, and your desktop). 
You choose what to search for using the 
Criteria pop-up menus, and the best way 
to see what you can search for is simply 
to click-and-hold on the first pop-up 
menu (it's a pretty darn amazing list, 
including searching through all the EXIF 
data embedded into your photo at the 
moment you took the shot). 



Step Four: 

When you click Find, the results of your 
search are displayed in the Content panel 
of Big Bridge itself (as seen here) and you 
can open any of the images directly into 
Photoshop (just double-click on them) 
or Camera Raw (if they're RAW images, 
they'll automatically open in Camera Raw 
first. If not, you can open JPEG or TIFF 
images in Camera Raw by clicking on 
them, then pressing Command-R [PC: 
Ctrl-R]. Easy to remember — just think 
"R" for "RAW"). 

TIP: Deleting Photos in Mini Bridge 

You can delete photos in Mini Bridge by 
going into Full Screen Preview mode and 
pressing Delete (Mac or PC). You'll get 
a dialog asking if you want to reject the 
file or delete it. If you press Command- 
Delete (PC: Ctrl-Delete), it automatically 
puts it in the Trash (PC: Recycle Bin) and 
moves on to the next image. 



Using Photoshop CS6's Mini Bridge Chapter 1 013 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Photoshop Killer Tips 



Syncing Mini Bridge with Big Bridge 

If you want to sync Adobe Bridge (I call 
it "Big Bridge") and Mini Bridge (so they 
both display the same images at the same 
time), start in Mini Bridge and click the 
Reveal in Bridge icon at the top left of the 
panel. This sends you over to Big Bridge, 
where you'll need to click the Return to 
Adobe Photoshop icon (it's a little boo- 
merang) near the top left of the window, 
and it boomerangs you back to Photoshop. 
Now, Mini Bridge and Big Bridge will both 
display the same folder of images. To turn 
off the syncing, press Command-Option-O 
(PC: Ctrl-Alt-O) to switch applications and 
choose a new folder, or just change appli- 
cations using the Dock (on a Mac) or the 
taskbar (on a PC). 




r\ ^ s\ 










\—l Computer 


> flLaGeHD > 


"^ ~ S -- 
















^^HK£»ffn< 


_.... 1 


j 


t *S*3&iSS&- 




i 




1 



Hiding the Path Bar & Tools 

If you don't wind up using the Path Bar a 
lot in your workflow, you can actually hide 
it from view altogether (which makes your 
thumbnails a little bit larger without resiz- 
ing Mini Bridge) by clicking on the down- 
facing arrow in the top-right corner of the 





- -I-O-I 






I Close Tab Croup 





panel and choosing Hide Toolbar. This 
hides the Path Bar and the icons for the 
View, Sort, and Filter menus. 

Seeing Just the Thumbnails Alone 

When I'm searching for just the right image, 
I want my distractions at a minimum, and if 
that sounds like you, try choosing Thumb- 
nail Only, under Show, from the View icon's 
pop-up menu near the left end of the Tool- 




File Name 
Labels and Ratings 
Date Created 
Date Modified 

File Size 
Document Type 
Dimensions 



bar. That hides the file's name, any star rat- 
ings, color labels, or any other distracting 
stuff, so you can focus on the images. 

Review Mode Time Saver 

I mentioned earlier in the chapter that 
if you're in Mini Bridge's Review mode 
(see page 6) and you find an image you 
want to work on, you can press R to open 
the image in Camera Raw (it doesn't mat- 
ter whether it's a RAW image, a JPEG, or 
a TIFF), and if you want to open a JPEG, 
TIFF, or even a PSD from Review mode 
directly into Photoshop, you can press O, 
but you can also Right-click on the image 
and choose Open from the pop-up menu, 




and it opens right up. You can also do 
other things from this pop-up menu, like 
add a color label to your image, or add 
a star rating, or rotate the file. 

Dragging-and-Dropping 
Right from Mini Bridge 

If you already have a document open 
in Photoshop, you can drag-and-drop 
an image directly from Mini Bridge right 
into that document and it appears as a 
smart object (not too shabby!). If the 



► 014 Chapter 1 Using Photoshop CS6's Mini Bridge 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



Photoshop Killer Tips 



photo is in RAW format, it opens in 
Camera Raw first (for any last minute 
tweaking), but then opens when you click 
OK. But my favorite drag-and-drop tip 
is this: You don't have to have a docu- 
ment already open. Just drag-and-drop 
your image from Mini Bridge right into the 
center area where your document would 
normally be, and it opens your photo in 
a new image window. You gotta try this! 
(If you're using a Mac, though, you need 
to have Application Frame turned on 
[under the Window menu] for this to 
work. If you don't, your image will just 
copy to your desktop.) 

Hidden Slide Show Shortcuts 

If you select a bunch of images in 
Mini Bridge, and choose Slideshow 
from the View icon's pop-up menu (at 
the top left of the panel), you get a 
full-screen, auto-advancing slide show 
complete with transitions. But there are 

Slideshow Options 

Display Options 
Li 1 Black Out Additional Monitors 

□ Repeat Slideshow 

LJ Zoom Back And Forth 



Slide Duration: ' 5 seconds 



Caption: I Compact 



"' 



When Presenting, Show Slides: 
O Centered 
Q Scaled to Fit 
O Scaled to Fill 



Transition Options 



Transition: | Dissolve 



Transition Speed: Faster 



3 I 



some hidden shortcuts you can use 
while it's running that are pretty handy. 
For example: Press the R key to pause 
the slide show and open the current 
photo in Camera Raw (just press the 
Spacebar to resume the slide show once 
you're done in Camera Raw); press the 
Period key to add a 1-star rating, press 
it twice to add a 2-star rating, and so on; 
press the Left Bracket key to rotate coun- 
terclockwise, and the Right Bracket key 
to rotate clockwise; press the L key to 
bring up the Slideshow Options dialog 
(shown here); and press the + (plus sign) 
key to zoom in, and the - (minus sign) 
key to zoom out. The numbers 1-5 also 
add star ratings, and 6-9 add color labels. 
Lastly, just press the H key to get a list of 
the slide show shortcuts. 

The Path Bar Is Live 

The Path Bar that shows the path to the 
current folder you're viewing isn't just for 
looks — it's live — meaning you can click 
on any of the folder names in the path 
and jump to that folder. 




Changing a File's Name 

If you want to change a file's name, just 
Right-click on its thumbnail in Mini Bridge 
and choose Rename. This highlights the 
name field and you can just type in the 
new name you want. Technically, you can 



also click directly on the name of the file 
itself and it will highlight, but the Right- 
click method works better, because it's too 
easy to accidentally open the image when 
you're trying to get that name field to high- 
light. One thing to know: this only works 
with one image at a time. If you want to 
batch rename a bunch of files, then you'll 
need to jump over to Big Bridge. 

Adding Favorites to Mini Bridge 

So, how do you get your favorite, most- 
used folders added to Mini Bridge's 
Navigation pod, so they're just one click 
away? Click the Reveal in Bridge icon at 
the top left of the panel to jump to Big 
Bridge, then in the Folders panel (at the 
top left of the window), find the folder you 
want to make a favorite. Once you find 
it, Right-click on it and choose Add to 
Favorites from the pop-up menu, then 
click the Return to Adobe Photoshop icon 
(the boomerang icon in the top left of 
the window) to jump back to Photoshop. 
Now, you'll see that folder added to your 
Favorites list in Mini Bridge. 




Using Photoshop CS6's Mini Bridge Chapter 1 015 4 




Photo by Scott Kelby Exposure: 1/1000 sec Focal Length: 400 mm Aperture Value: f/2.8 



Chapter 2 The Essentials of Camera Raw 




WWF Raw 

the essentials of camera raw 



Now, if you're reading the English-language version of this 
book, you probably instantly recognized the chapter title 
"WWF Raw" from the wildly popular American TV series 
Wasabi with Fries Raw (though in Germany, it's called 
Weinerschnitzel Mit Fischrogen Raw, and in Spain, it's called 
simply Lucha Falsa, which translated literally means "Lunch 
Feet"). Anyway, it's been a tradition of mine, going back 
about 50 books or so, to name the chapters after a movie 
title, song title, or TV show, and while "WWF Raw" may not 
be the ideal name for a chapter on Camera Raw essentials, 
it's certainly better than my second choice, "Raw Meat" 
(named after the 1972 movie starring Donald Pleasence. The 
sequel, Steak Tartare, was released straight to DVD in 1976, 
nearly 20 years before DVDs were even invented, which is 
quite remarkable for a movie whose French version wound 
up being called Boeuf Gate Dans la Toilette, with French 



actor Jean-Pierre Pommes Frites playing the lead role of 
Marcel, the dog-faced boy). Anyway, finding movies, TV 
shows, and song titles with the word "raw" in them isn't as 
easy as it looks, and since this book has not one, not two, 
not three, but... well, yes, actually it has three chapters on 
Camera Raw, I'm going to have to do some serious research 
to come up with something that tops "WWF Raw," but isn't 
"Raw Meat," and doesn't use the same name I used back 
in the CS4 edition of this book, which was "Raw Deal" 
(from the 1986 movie starring California Governor Arnold 
from Happy Days. See, that was a vague reference to the 
guy who played the diner owner in the '70s sitcom Happy 
Days, starring Harrison Ford and Marlon Brando). But 
what I really can't wait for is to see how the people who 
do the foreign translations of my books translate this intro. 
C'est magnifique, amigos! 



017 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Working with 
Camera Raw 



Although Adobe Camera Raw was originally created to process photos taken 
in your camera's RAW format, you can also use it to process your JPEG and TIFF 
photos. A big advantage of using Camera Raw that many people don't realize is 
that it's just plain easier and faster to make your images look good using Camera Raw 
than with any other method. Camera Raw's controls are simple, they're instantaneous, 
and they're totally undoable, which makes it hard to beat. But first, you've got to open 
your images in Camera Raw for processing. 



Opening RAW Images: 

Since Camera Raw was designed to 
open RAW images, if you double-click 
on a RAW image (whether in Mini Bridge 
or just in a folder on your computer), it will 
launch Photoshop and open that RAW 
image in Camera Raw (its full official name 
is Adobe Camera Raw, but here in the 
book, I'll just be calling it "Camera Raw" 
for short, because. ..well. ..that's what 
I call it). Note: If you double-click on what 
you know is a RAW image and it doesn't 
open in Camera Raw, make sure you have 
the latest version of Camera Raw — im- 
ages from newly released cameras need 
the latest versions of Camera Raw to rec- 
ognize their RAW files. 



Opening JPEG & TIFF Images 
from Mini Bridge: 

If you want to open a JPEG or TIFF image 

from Mini Bridge, it's easy: Right-click 

on it and, from the pop-up menu, under 

Open With, choose Camera Raw. 




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The Essentials of Camera Raw 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



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Opening JPEG & TIFF Images 
from Your Computer: 

If you want to open a JPEG or TIFF image 
from your computer, then here's what you 
do: On a Mac, go under Photoshop's File 
menu and choose Open. When the Open 
dialog appears, click on your JPEG (or 
TIFF, but we'll use a JPEG as our example) 
image, and in the Format pop-up menu, it 
will say JPEG. You need to click-and-hold 
on that Format pop-up menu, and from 
that menu choose Camera Raw, as shown 
here. Then click the Open button, and your 
JPEG image will open in Camera Raw. In 
Windows, just go under Photoshop's File 
menu and choose Open As, then navi- 
gate your way to that JPEG or TIFF image, 
change the Open As pop-up menu to 
Camera Raw, and click Open. 



Opening Multiple Images: 

You can open multiple RAW photos in 
Camera Raw by selecting them first (either 
in Mini Bridge or in a folder on your com- 
puter), then just double-clicking on any 
one of them, and they'll all open in Camera 
Raw and appear in a filmstrip along the left 
side of the Camera Raw window (as seen 
here). If the photos are JPEGs or TIFFs, in 
Mini Bridge, select 'em first, then switch 
to Review mode, and press Option-R 
(PC: Alt-R). If they're in a folder on your 
computer, then you'll need to use Mini 
Bridge to open them, as well (just use 
the Path Bar in Mini Bridge to navigate 
to where those images are located). 



(Continued) 



The Essentials of Camera Raw Chapter 2 01 <H 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Editing JPEG & TIFF Images 
in Camera Raw: 

One thing about editing JPEGs and 
TIFFs in Camera Raw: When you make 
adjustments to a JPEG or TIFF and you 
click the Open Image button, it opens 
your image in Photoshop (as you'd ex- 
pect). However, if you just want to save 
the changes you made in Camera Raw 
without opening the photo in Photo- 
shop, then click the Done button instead 
(as shown here), and your changes will 
be saved. But there is a big distinction 
between editing JPEG or TIFF images 
and editing a RAW image. If you click 
the Done button, you're actually affect- 
ing the real pixels of the original JPEG or 
TIFF, whereas, if this were a RAW image, 
you wouldn't be (which is another big 
advantage of shooting in RAW). If you 
click the Open Image button, and open 
your JPEG or TIFF in Photoshop, you're 
opening and editing the real image, as 
well. Just so you know. 



The Two Camera Raws: 

Here's another thing you'll need to 
know: there are actually two Camera 
Raws — one in Photoshop, and a separate 
one in Bridge. The advantage of having 
two Camera Raws comes into play when 
you're processing (or saving) a lot of 
RAW photos — you can have them pro- 
cessing in Bridge's version of Camera 
Raw, while you're working on some- 
thing else in Photoshop. If you find your- 
self using Bridge's Camera Raw most 
often, then you'll probably want to press 
Command-K (PC: Ctrl-K) to bring up 
Bridge's Preferences, click on General 
on the left, and then turn on the check- 
box for Double-Click Edits Camera Raw 
Settings in Bridge (as shown here). Now, 
double-clicking on a photo opens RAW 
photos in Bridge's Camera Raw, rather 
than Photoshop's. 




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► 020 



Chapter 2 



The Essentials of Camera Raw 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



Not only are there new sliders in Photoshop CS6's version of Camera Raw, but 

some of the old sliders now do different things, and understanding that now 

(before we just dive right in) will help it all make more sense. I'm going to borrow 

the way the histogram works in the current version of Adobe Photoshop Lightroom, 

which has the latest Camera Raw built into it, because it will help you visually 

understand the changes of these new sliders. 



For CS4/CS5 Users 
Only: Understanding 
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2. Affected by the Shadows slider 

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CS6: Now use Shadows slider 



CS6: Now use Exposure slider 



Old CS4/CS5 Camera Raw: 

Four sliders controlled the entire tonal 
range, which limited your editing. One 
problem was that the Exposure slider 
covered too much of that range — from 
the midtones all the way through the 
highlights (see #3 in the histogram on 
the left here). Plus, you could only 
increase the amounts of Recovery, 
Fill Light, and Blacks — you couldn't 
decrease them. 



New CS6 Camera Raw: 

Now, five sliders control the overall tonal 
range (so you have more control), and 
they're consistent now — all starting in the 
center, so that dragging a slider to the left 
darkens the adjustment and dragging to 
the right brightens it. Also, the Exposure 
slider now controls a smaller range (mostly 
the midtones, as seen in the histogram 
on the right above), and it has a Recov- 
ery algorithm built in now, so you can 
increase it much more than you could in 
CS4/CS5 without clipping the highlights. 
If you do clip the highlights (perhaps 
in-camera), you now use the Highlights 
slider first to fix the clipping, and tweak 
the Exposure slider, if necessary. The 
Highlights and Shadows sliders are some- 
what like the Levels adjustment's white 
and black points. Shadows is a more 
subtle, but far better looking, Fill Light 
control (think Fill Light without the halos 
and HDR-effect look). 



The Essentials of Camera Raw 



Chapter 2 



021 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Updating to the 
Latest Camera Raw 

Editing Features 
(Not for New Users) 



Okay, this is only for those who have been using Camera Raw in previous versions 
of Photoshop (like CS5, CS4, etc.), because if this is the first time you'll be using it, 
this won't affect you at all, so you can skip this. Here's why: in Photoshop CS6, 
Adobe dramatically improved the math and controls for the Basic panel, so if you 
have RAW images you edited in earlier versions of Camera Raw, when you open 
them in CS6's updated version of Camera Raw, you'll have the choice of keeping 
the old look (and old controls) or updating to the new, vastly improved Basic panel 
controls (called the 2012 process version). 



Step One: 

Even before you bought this book, you 
probably heard that Camera Raw now 
has a different set of sliders that offer 
more powerful, and overall just better, 
control over your images, but when you 
open a RAW image in CS6's Camera Raw 
that you previously edited in an earlier 
version of Camera Raw, you might be 
surprised to see that all the sliders look 
exactly the same as they did before. 
That's because Adobe didn't want to 
change the way your already-processed 
photo looks without your permission, so 
at this point, your image looks the same 
(and so do Camera Raw's sliders — the Fill 
Light and Recovery sliders are still there). 



Step Two: 

However, the processing technology 
being used on your photo at this point is 
actually out-of-date. If fact, it's either old 
technology from 2010, or if you're mov- 
ing up from CS4, it's actually processing 
technology from back in 2003. Adobe 
calls these "process versions" — if you 
go to the Camera Calibration panel and 
click on the Process pop-up menu (as 
shown here), you can choose from the 
three different versions (the 2010 version 
improved the sharpening and noise 
reduction quality pretty dramatically). 




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Chapter 2 



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"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



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Step Three: 

Of course, you could choose the 
2012 (current) process version from that 
pop-up menu and your image will be up- 
dated to the current processing power, 
and all the new, improved sliders will 
appear in the Basic panel. But, I'd only 
do that if I were charging by the hour, 
because there's a much quicker way to 
do it. When you open an image edited 
in a previous version of Camera Raw, you'll 
see a warning icon in the bottom-right 
corner of the Preview area (actually, it's an 
exclamation point, shown circled here in 
red). To instantly update to the latest ver- 
sion, just click directly on that exclamation 
point and it's updated. 

TIP: Getting Fill Light 
& Recovery Back 

If you ever decide that you just can't 

live without the old Fill Light and/or 

Recovery sliders, just go to the Camera 

Calibration panel and from the Process 

pop-up menu up top, choose 2010, and 

they instantly reappear (but you'll be 

using the old processing technology 

now, as well). 



Step Four: 

Now your image is updated to the 
latest processing technology, and 
it's been my experience that just by 
converting to the new process ver- 
sion, my photos look instantly better 
(well, in the vast majority of cases — in 
some cases, they look the same, but I've 
never had one I thought looked worse). 
However, if you didn't apply any Basic 
panel adjustments to your image pre- 
viously, there's nothing for it really to 
update, so you're not going to notice a 
change when you update. In this image, 
once I updated to the 2012 process 
version, I was able to increase the Clarity 
more (without creating halos), and I 
bumped up the Exposure a bit, too. 



The Essentials of Camera Raw 



Chapter 2 



023 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Miss the JPEG Look? 
Try Applying a 
Camera Profile 



If you've ever wondered why RAW images look good on your camera's LCD, but look 
flat when you open them in Camera Raw, it's because what you see on your LCD is a 
JPEG preview (even though you're shooting in RAW), and your camera automatically 
adds color correction, sharpening, etc., to them. When you shoot in RAW, you're 
telling the camera, "Turn all that color enhancement and sharpening off — just leave 
it untouched, and I'll process it myself." But, if you'd like that JPEG-processed look 
as a starting place for your RAW photo editing, camera profiles can get you close. 



Step One: 

Click on the Camera Calibration icon (the 
third icon from the right) near the top of 
the Panel area, and in the Camera Profile 
section, click-and-hold on the Name pop- 
up menu, and you'll see a list of camera 
profiles available for your particular cam- 
era (it reads the embedded EXIF data, 
so it knows which brand of camera you 
use). For example, if you shoot Nikon, 
you'll see a list of the in-camera picture 
styles (shown here) you could have ap- 
plied to your image if you had taken the 
shot in JPEG mode (if you shoot in RAW, 
Camera Raw ignores those in-camera 
profiles, as explained above). If you shoot 
Canon, you'll see a slightly different list, 
but it does the same type of thing. 



Step Two: 

The default profile will be Adobe Standard. 
Now, ask yourself this: "Does the word 
'Standard' ever mean 'Kick Butt?'" Not 
usually, which is why I suggest you try 
out the different profiles in this list and 
see which ones you like. At the very least, 
I would change it to Camera Standard, 
which I think usually gives you a better 
starting place (as seen here). 



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"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



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Depending on the individual photo you're 
editing, Camera Standard might not be 
the right choice, but as the photographer, 
this is a call you have to make (in other 
words, it's up to you to choose which 
one looks best to you). I usually wind up 
using either Camera Standard, Camera 
Landscape, or Camera Vivid for images 
taken with a Nikon camera, because 
I think Landscape and Vivid look the most 
like the JPEGs I see on the back of my 
camera. But again, if you're not shoot- 
ing Nikon, Landscape or Vivid won't be 
one of the available choices (Nikons have 
eight picture styles and Canons have six). 
If you don't shoot Canon or Nikon, or one 
of a handful of other cameras, then you'll 
only have Adobe Standard, and possibly 
Camera Standard, to choose from, but 
you can create your own custom profiles 
using Adobe's free DNG Profile Editor 
utility, available from Adobe at http:// 
labs.adobe.com. 



Step Four: 

Here's a before/after with only one thing 
done to this photo: I chose Camera Vivid 
(as shown in the pop-up menu in Step 
Three). Again, this is designed to rep- 
licate the color looks you could have 
chosen in the camera, so if you want to 
have Camera Raw give you a similar look 
as a starting point, give this a try. Also, 
since Camera Raw allows you to open 
more than one image at a time (in fact, 
you can open hundreds at a time), you 
could open a few hundred images, then 
click the Select All button that will ap- 
pear at the top-left corner of the window, 
change the camera profile for the first- 
selected image, and then all the other 
images will have that same profile auto- 
matically applied. Now, you can just 
click the Done button. 



The Essentials of Camera Raw 



Chapter 2 



025 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



The Essential 

Adjustments: 

White Balance 



If you've ever taken a photo indoors, chances are it came out with kind of a yellowish 
tint. Unless you took the shot in an office, and then it probably had a green tint. If you 
just took a shot of somebody in the shade, the photo probably had a blue tint. Those 
are white balance problems, and if we properly set our white balance in the camera, 
we won't see these color problems (the photos will just look normal), but since most 
of us shoot with our cameras set to Auto White Balance, we're going to run into them. 
Luckily, we can fix them pretty easily. 



Step One: 

The white balance is usually the very 
first thing I adjust in my own Camera 
Raw workflow, because getting the 
white balance right will eliminate 99% 
of your color problems right off the 
bat. At the top of the Basic panel (on 
the right side of the Camera Raw win- 
dow), are the White Balance controls. 
If you look to the right of the words 
"White Balance," you'll see a pop-up 
menu (shown circled here in red), and by 
default it shows you the "As Shot" white 
balance (you're seeing the white bal- 
ance you had set in your camera when 
you took the shot). I had been shooting 
indoors under regular indoor lighting, 
so my white balance had been set to 
Tungsten, but then I went into the studio 
and didn't change my white balance, 
so the first few shots came out with a 
heavy bluish tint (as seen here — yeech!) 
and that's why the white balance is way, 
way off. 




► 026 



Chapter 2 



The Essentials of Camera Raw 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



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Step Two: 

There are three ways to change the white 
balance in your photo, and the first is to 
simply choose one of the built-in White 
Balance presets. Fairly often, that's all you 
need to do to color correct your image. 
Just click on the White Balance pop-up 
menu, and you'll see a list of white bal- 
ance settings you could have chosen in 
the camera. Just choose the preset that 
most closely matches what the lighting 
situation was when you originally took 
the photo (for example, if you took the 
shot in the shade of a tree, you'd choose 
the Shade preset). Here I tried each pre- 
set and Flash seemed to look best — 
it removed the bluish tint and made the 
background gray again. {Note: This is 
the one main area where the processing 
of RAW and JPEG or TIFF images differs. 
You'll only get this full list of white balance 
presets with RAW images. With JPEGs or 
TIFFs, your only choice is As Shot or Auto 
white balance.) 



Step Three: 

The second method is to use the 
Temperature and Tint sliders (found right 
below the White Balance preset menu). 
The bars behind the sliders are color 
coded so you can see which way to drag 
to get which kind of color tint. What I 
like to do is use the built-in presets to 
get close (as a starting point), and then 
if my color is just a little too blue or too 
yellow, I drag in the opposite direction. 
So, in this example, the Flash preset was 
close, but made it a little too yellow, so I 
dragged the Temperature slider a little 
bit toward blue and the Tint slider 
a tiny bit toward magenta. 



(Continued) 



The Essentials of Camera Raw Chapter 2 027 i 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Four: 

Just a couple of other quick things 
about manually setting your white bal- 
ance using the Temperature and Tint 
sliders: If you move a slider and decide 
you didn't want to move it after all, just 
double-click directly on the little slider 
"nub" itself, and it will reset to its pre- 
vious location. By the way, I generally 
just adjust the Temperature slider, and 
rarely have to touch the Tint slider. Also, 
to reset the white balance to where it 
was when you opened the image, just 
choose As Shot from the White Balance 
pop-up menu (as seen here). 



Step Five: 

The third method is my personal favorite, 
and the method I use the most often, and 
that is setting the white balance using the 
White Balance tool (I). This is perhaps the 
most accurate because it takes a white 
balance reading from the photo itself. 
You just click on the White Balance tool 
in the toolbar at the top left (it's circled 
in red here), and then click it on some- 
thing in your photo that's supposed to 
be a light gray (that's right — you prop- 
erly set the white balance by clicking on 
something that's light gray). So, take the 
tool and click it once on the background 
near her hair (as shown here) and it sets 
the white balance for you. If you don't like 
how it looks, then just click on a different 
light gray area. (It was a little dark, so I 
bumped up the Exposure a little, too.) 

TIP: Quick White Balance Reset 

To quickly reset your white balance to the 
As Shot setting, just double-click on the 
White Balance tool up in the toolbar. 





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Chapter 2 



The Essentials of Camera Raw 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



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white balance has 
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After: With one click of the White Balance 
tool, everything comes together 



Step Six: 

Now, here's the thing: although this 
can give you a perfectly accurate white 
balance, it doesn't mean that it will look 
good. White balance is a creative decision, 
and the most important thing is that your 
photo looks good to you. So don't get 
caught up in that "I don't like the way the 
white balance looks, but I know it's accu- 
rate" thing that sucks some people in — 
set your white balance so it looks right to 
you. You are the bottom line. You're the 
photographer. It's your photo, so make it 
look its best. Accurate is not another word 
for good. By the way, you can just Right- 
click on your image to access the White 
Balance pop-up menu (as shown here). 



Step Seven: 

Here's a before/after so you can see 
what a difference setting a proper white 
balance makes (by the way, you can see 
a quick before/after of your white balance 
edit by pressing the letter P on your key- 
board to toggle the Preview on/off). 



TIP: Using the Gray Card 

To help you find that neutral light 
gray color in your images, I've in- 
cluded an 18% gray card in the 
back of this book (it's perforated, 
so you can tear it out). Once your 
lighting is set, just have your subject 
hold it while you take one shot. Then, 
open that image in Camera Raw, and 
click the White Balance tool on the 
card in your image to instantly set 
your white balance. Now, apply that 
same white balance to all the other 
shots taken under that same light 
(more on how to do that coming up 
in the next chapter). 



The Essentials of Camera Raw 



Chapter 2 



029 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



The Essential 

Adjustments #2: 

Exposure 



The next thing I fix (after adjusting the white balance) is the photo's exposure. 
Now, some might argue that this is the most essential adjustment of them all, but 
if your photo looks way too blue, nobody will notice if the photo's underexposed 
by a third of a stop, so I fix the white balance first, then I worry about exposure. 
However, exposure in Camera Raw isn't just the Exposure slider. It's actually five 
sliders: Exposure (midtones), Blacks (deep shadows), Shadows (regular shadows), 
Highlights (well-named), and Whites (extreme highlights). 



Step One: 

I recommend (and so does Adobe) start- 
ing with the top tonal slider in the Basic 
panel (Exposure) and working your way 
down through the other sliders in order, 
which is a different workflow than in pre- 
vious versions of Camera Raw, where it 
didn't matter too much which slider you 
moved when. However, in CS6, it works 
best if you start by getting the Exposure 
(midtones) set first, and then if things 
look kind of washed out, adding some 
Contrast (the contrast slider in CS6 is way, 
way better than the one in CS5 and ear- 
lier, which I generally avoided). This photo, 
well, it's a mess. Taken in harsh, unflatter- 
ing light, it needs some serious Camera 
Raw help. 



Step Two: 

Start by adjusting the Exposure slider. 
This photo is way overexposed, so drag 
it to the left to darken the midtones and 
the overall exposure. Here, I dragged 
it over to -1 .25 (it looks a lot better al- 
ready), but the image is still kind of flat 
looking, and that's why your next step 
should be to adjust the contrast (by the 
way, although you can drag the Contrast 
slider to the left to make things less 
contrasty, I can't remember an occasion 
where I wanted my image to look more 
flat, so I don't drag to the left. Ever. 
But, hey, that's just me). 






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Chapter 2 



The Essentials of Camera Raw 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



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Step Three: 

In previous versions of Camera Raw, 
when I saw an image looking flat like 
this one did back in Step Two, I would 
reach for the Blacks slider, but in CS6, 
now you increase the contrast using the 
Contrast slider, which makes the bright 
areas brighter and the dark areas darker 
(here, I dragged it to the right to +82, 
which helped deal with the flat, low- 
contrast look). These two steps — adjust- 
ing the Exposure and then the Contrast 
slider (if necessary) — should be your 
starting points every time. This top-down 
approach helps, because the other sliders 
build off this exposure foundation, and it 
will keep you from having to constantly 
keep tweaking slider after slider. So, think 
of these two as the foundation of your ex- 
posure, and the rest are kind of optional 
based on the image you're working on. 



Step Four: 

Before we go any further, increasing our 
contrast to where we wanted it created 
a clipping problem, meaning we are clip- 
ping off our highlights (part of our photo 
got so bright that it won't have any de- 
tail in that area at all. It's blown out. If 
all that sounds bad, well, that's 'cause it 
is). Luckily, Camera Raw will give you a 
warning if you're clipping, in the upper- 
right corner of the histogram. See that 
triangle? That's the highlight clipping 
warning (although I just call it "the white 
triangle of death"). Now, if you do see 
a white triangle, don't freak out. First, 
go up and click directly on that white 
triangle and the areas that are clipping 
will appear in red (look on her arm). 
We do this to find out if what's clipping 
is an area of important detail, or if it's 
like a tiny highlight on a chrome bumper 
or something meaningless in the back- 
ground of your image. 

(Continued) 



The Essentials of Camera Raw 



Chapter 2 



031 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

If that red highlight shows over an area 
you feel has important detail (her arm 
and other areas here certainly seem 
important to me), go to the Highlights 
slider and drag it to the left until the red 
areas disappear (here, I dragged the 
Highlights slider to the left to -18). For 
those of you upgrading from an earlier 
version of Camera Raw, I kind of hesitate 
to say this replaces the Recovery slider, 
because there's more going on than just 
that, due to the way Adobe reworked the 
Exposure slider. Now when you adjust 
the Exposure slider, there's less chance 
of clipping than ever before, so it's kind 
of like the Exposure slider has some built- 
in Recovery power, too! That being said, 
I still look to the Highlights slider to re- 
cover clipped highlights first, and then 
if that doesn't do the trick, I try lowering 
the Exposure amount, but I rarely have 
to do that. 

TIP: The Color Warning Triangles 

If you see a red, yellow, magenta, etc., 
color warning triangle (rather than white), 
it's not great, but it's not nearly as bad 
as white. It means you're clipping just that 
one color channel (and there's still detail 
in the other channels). 



Step Six: 

The next slider down, Shadows, is another 
one you only use if there's a problem (just 
like the Highlights slider), and in this case, 
the problem is we can't see any detail in 
the upper-left corner of the photo. We 
can see that something's there, but we 
can't see exactly what. That's when you 
reach for the Shadows slider — drag it 
to the right to brighten the shadows 
(like I did here, where I dragged it over 
to +87) and look how you can now see 
the pottery in the background. 



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Chapter 2 



The Essentials of Camera Raw 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 





Step Seven: 

Before we leave the Shadows slider, we 
need to switch to another image for just 
a moment (we'll come back to the other 
image shortly), because I want to point 
out that one of the most common times 
you'll use the Shadows slider is when your 
subject is backlit like this one, where the 
sky is pretty well exposed, but the fore- 
ground is really dark. When I was standing 
there, of course my eye compensated 
perfectly for the two vastly different ex- 
posures, but our cameras still aren't as 
sophisticated as the human eye, so we 
get shots that look like this. In previous 
versions of Camera Raw, I'd reach for the 
Fill Light slider to fix this problem, but of 
course, it created its own problems (if you 
bumped it way up, your image started 
to look a bit HDR-like, but not in a good 
way). Now, in CS6, the Shadows slider 
works with the Exposure slider to give 
you better results than the old Fill Light 
slider alone could give. Start by bumping 
up the Exposure, and then the Contrast 
(the Shadows slider will work much better 
when you tweak these first). 



Step Eight: 

Now, drag the Shadows slider way 
over to the right to open up those rocks 
and the foreground, so the whole image 
looks more balanced (here, I dragged 
over to +90). That overprocessed Fill 
Light look from previous versions of Cam- 
era Raw is gone. Instead, we have a much 
more natural-looking edit. Believe it or 
not, bumping the Shadows up this much 
created some highlight clipping in the 
Red channel (I saw the red highlight 
warning triangle appear in the upper- 
right corner), but that's an easy fix — I just 
dragged the Whites slider a little bit to 
the left (to -17, as shown here) to re- 
duce the brightest highlights. Now we 
can jump back to our original image. 



(Continued) 



The Essentials of Camera Raw Chapter 2 033 i 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Nine: 

The last two essential exposure sliders are 
the Whites and Blacks. If you're used to 
working with Levels in Photoshop, you'll 
totally get these, because they're like set- 
ting your highlight and shadow points 
(or your white and black points). Most of 
the time, if I use the Whites slider (which 
controls the brightest highlights), I find 
myself dragging it to the right to make 
sure the whites are nice and bright white 
(and not light gray), but in this instance, 
I was using the Whites slider to pull the 
whites back a bit (to help hide the fact 
that it was shot in harsh, direct daylight), 
so I dragged it to the left (to darken the 
whites) to around -28. I also increased 
the deepest shadows by dragging the 
Blacks slider to the left just a little bit 
(here, I dragged over to -10). I still use 
this slider if, near the end of the edit- 
ing process, I think the color needs more 
oomph, as this helps the colors look satu- 
rated and less washed out. Here's a be- 
fore/after, but I did add two last finish- 
ing touches, which were to increase the 
Clarity a little (more on this coming up 
on page 36) and I increased the Vibrance 
amount a bit. Again, I recommend doing 
all of this in a top-to-bottom order, but 
just understand that not every image will 
need an adjustment to the Highlights 
and Shadows — only mess with those 
if you have a problem in those areas. 
Otherwise, skip 'em. 



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► 034 Chapter 2 The Essentials of Camera Raw 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



If you're not quite comfortable with manually adjusting each image, 

Camera Raw does come with a one-click Auto function, which takes a stab 

at correcting the overall exposure of your image (including contrast, highlights, 

shadows, etc.), and at this point in Camera Raw's evolution, it's really not that bad. 

If you like the results, you can set up Camera Raw's preferences so every photo, 

upon opening in Camera Raw, will be auto-adjusted using that same feature. 



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Step One: 

Once you have an image open in Camera 
Raw, you can have Camera Raw take a 
stab at setting the overall exposure (using 
the controls in the Basic panel) for you 
by clicking on the Auto button (shown 
circled in red here). In older versions of 
Camera Raw, this Auto correction feature 
was. ..well. ..let's just say it was less than 
stellar, but it's gotten much better since 
then, and now it does a somewhat de- 
cent job (especially if you're stuck and 
not sure what to do), so click on it and 
see how it looks. If it doesn't look good, 
no sweat — just press Command-Z (PC: 
Ctrl-Z) to Undo. 



Step Two: 

You can set up Camera Raw so it automat- 
ically performs an Auto Tone adjustment 
each time you open a photo — just click on 
the Preferences icon up in Camera Raw's 
toolbar (it's the third icon from the right), 
and when the dialog appears, turn on the 
checkbox for Apply Auto Tone Adjust- 
ments (shown circled here), then click OK. 
Now, Camera Raw will evaluate each 
image and try to correct it. If you don't 
like its tonal corrections, then you can 
just click on the Default button, which 
appears to the right of the Auto button 
(the Auto button will be grayed out be- 
cause it's already been applied). 



The Essentials of Camera Raw 



Chapter 2 



035 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Adding Punch 

to Your Images 

with Clarity 



This is one of my favorite features in Camera Raw, and whenever I show it in a class, 
it never fails to get "Oooohs" and "Ahhhhs." I think it's because it's just one simple 
slider, yet it does so much to add "snap" to your image. The Clarity slider (which is 
well-named) basically increases the midtone contrast in a way that gives your photo 
more punch and impact, without actually sharpening the image. I add lots of Clarity 
anytime I want to enhance the texture in an image, and it works great on everything 
from landscapes to cityscapes, from travel photos to portraits of men — anything 
where emphasizing texture would look good. 



Step One: 

The Clarity slider is found in the bottom 
section of the Basic panel in Camera 
Raw, right above the Vibrance and Sat- 
uration sliders. (Although its official name 
is Clarity, I heard that at one point Adobe 
engineers considered naming it "Punch" 
instead, as they felt using it added punch 
to the image.) To clearly see the effects 
of Clarity, first zoom in to a 100% view 
by double-clicking on the Zoom tool up 
in the toolbar (it looks like a magnifying 
glass). In the example shown here, I only 
zoomed to 25% so you could see more 
of the image. 



Step Two: 

Using the Clarity control couldn't be 
easier — drag the slider to the right to 
increase the amount of punch (midtone 
contrast) in your image (compare the top 
and bottom images shown here). Here, 
I dragged it over to +100, which is some- 
thing you really couldn't get away with in 
earlier versions of Camera Raw (you'd get 
horrible halos around everything), but in 
CS6, you can crank that puppy up and it 
looks awesome! Any image I edit where 
I want to emphasize the texture (land- 
scapes, cityscapes, sports photos, etc.) 
gets between +25 and +50 Clarity, but 
now you can crank it up even higher in 
most cases (as seen here). 








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The Essentials of Camera Raw 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



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Step Three: 

Of course, there are subjects where you 
don't want to emphasize texture (like 
women and children), and in those cases, 
I don't apply any positive Clarity. However, 
you can also use the Clarity control in 
reverse — to soften skin. This is called add- 
ing negative Clarity, meaning you can 
apply less than (zero) to reduce the mid- 
tone contrast, which gives you a softening 
effect, but you don't want to apply it to 
the entire image, so you'd use the Adjust- 
ment Brush to apply it (more on the 
Adjustment Brush in Chapter 4). Here's 
an original image without any negative 
Clarity applied. 



Step Four: 

Here, I've taken the Adjustment 
Brush (again, lots on how to use this 
in Chapter 4), and I set the Clarity all the 
way to the left, to -100, for super-soft 
skin softening. To balance all that soft- 
ness, I also increased the Sharpness 
amount to +25 (more on this soon, too), 
and then I painted over just her skin, 
being careful to avoid any areas that 
should stay nice and sharp, like her 
eyes, eyebrows, nostrils, lips, hair, and 
the edges of her face. Take a look at 
how much softer our subject's skin 
looks now. Now, if you need to soften 
up some skin really quickly, and you're 
not super-fussy about how it looks, 
negative Clarity can do the trick. 



The Essentials of Camera Raw 



Chapter 2 



037 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Adjusting Contrast 
Using Curves 



The much-improved Contrast slider in CS6's Camera Raw will still only take you 
so far, but luckily there's Curves, which is a powerful ally in your fight against 
flat-looking photos. While I've got you here, there's something else new in this 
new version, another feature from regular Photoshop made its way into Camera 
Raw: the ability to edit individual R, G, and B channels with Curves. Okay, I don't 
use this feature, but somebody could really have some fun with it (for cross- 
processing effects, if nothing else). 



Step One: 

After you've done all your exposure 
adjustments in the Basic panel, and you 
feel you need more contrast (hey, it's 
possible), it's time to head for the Tone 
Curve panel (click on the second icon 
from the left, near the top of the Panel 
area, shown circled here in red). There 
are two different types of curves avail- 
able here: the Point curve, and the Para- 
metric curve. We'll start with the Point 
curve, so click on the Point tab at the 
top of the panel. Here's what the photo 
shown here looks like with no added 
contrast in the Point curve (notice that the 
Curve pop-up menu above the curve is 
set to Linear, which is a flat, unadjusted 
curve). Note: In previous versions of Cam- 
era Raw, RAW images had the default 
curve set to Medium Contrast (since your 
camera didn't add any contrast), but 
now in CS6, just like when you shoot 
in JPEG, no additional contrast will be 
added by default. 



Step Two: 

If you want more contrast, choose Strong 
Contrast from the Curve pop-up menu 
(as shown here), and you can see how 
much more contrast this photo now has, 
compared with Step One. The difference 
is the Strong Contrast settings create a 
steeper curve, and the steeper the curve, 
the more contrast it creates. 



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► 038 



Chapter 2 



The Essentials of Camera Raw 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 





Step Three: 

If you're familiar with Photoshop's 
Curves and want to create your own 
custom curve, start by choosing any 
one of the preset curves, then either 
click-and-drag the adjustment points 
on the curve or use the Arrow keys to 
move them (I think it's easier to click 
on a point, then use the Up and Down 
Arrow keys on your keyboard to move 
that part of the curve up or down). 
If you'd prefer to start from scratch, 
choose Linear from the Curve pop-up 
menu, which gives you a flat curve. To 
add adjustment points, just click along 
the curve. To remove a point, just click- 
and-drag it right off the curve (drag 
it off quickly, like you're pulling off a 
Band-Aid). 



Step Four: 

If you create a curve that you'd like to be 
able to apply again to other photos, you 
can save this curve as a preset. To do that, 
click on the Presets icon (the second icon 
from the right) near the top of the Panel 
area to bring up the Presets panel. Next, 
click on the New Preset icon (which looks 
just like Photoshop's Create a New Layer 
icon) at the bottom of the panel. This 
brings up the New Preset dialog (shown 
here). If you just want to save this curve 
setting, from the Subset pop-up menu 
near the top, choose Point Curve, and 
it turns off the checkboxes for all the 
other settings available as presets, and 
leaves only the Point Curve checkbox 
turned on (as shown here). Give your 
preset a name (I named mine "Mega 
Contrast") and click OK. 

(Continued) 



The Essentials of Camera Raw 



Chapter 2 



039 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

If you're not comfortable with adjusting 
the Point curve, try the Parametric curve, 
which lets you craft your curve using slid- 
ers that adjust the curve for you. Click on 
the Parametric tab, and you'll see four 
sliders, which control the four different 
areas of the curve, but before you start 
"sliding," know that the adjustments you 
make here are added to anything you did 
in the Point tab (if you did anything there 
first — I reset the Point tab's Curve pop- 
up menu to Linear here). 



Step Six: 

The Highlights slider controls the high- 
lights area of the curve (the top of the 
curve), and dragging it to the right arcs 
the curve upward, making the highlights 
brighter. Right below that is the Lights 
slider, which covers the next lower range 
of tones (the area between the midtones 
and the highlights). Dragging this slider 
to the right makes this part of the curve 
steeper, and increases the upper mid- 
tones. The Darks and Shadows sliders do 
pretty much the same thing for the lower 
midtones and deep shadow areas. But 
remember, dragging to the right opens 
up those areas, so to create contrast, 
you'd drag both of those to the left in- 
stead. Here, to create some really punchy 
contrast, I dragged both the Highlights 
and Lights sliders to the right, and the 
Darks and Shadows sliders to the left. 




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Chapter 2 



The Essentials of Camera Raw 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 







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Step Seven: 

Another advantage of the Parametric 
curve is that you can use the region 
divider controls (under the curve) to 
choose how wide a range each of the 
four sliders covers. So, if you move the 
far-right region divider to the right, it 
expands the area controlled by the 
Lights slider. Now the Highlights slider 
has less impact, flattening the upper 
part of the curve, so the contrast is 
decreased. If I drag that same region 
divider control back to the left instead 
(shown here), it expands the Highlights 
slider's area, which steepens the curve 
and increases contrast. 



Step Eight: 

If all of this makes you a bit squeamish, 
have I got a tool for you: it's called the 
Targeted Adjustment tool (or TAT for 
short) and you'll find it up in the toolbar 
at the top of the window (it's the fifth tool 
from the left, shown circled here). Just 
move the tool over the part of the image 
you want to adjust, then drag upward to 
lighten that area, or downward to darken 
it (this just moves the part of the curve 
that represents that part of the image). 
A lot of photographers love the TAT, so 
make sure you give it a try, because it 
makes getting that one area you want 
brighter (or darker) easier. Now, there is 
one caveat (I've been waiting to use that 
word for a while), and that is: it doesn't 
just adjust that one area of your photo — it 
adjusts the curve itself. So, depending on 
the image, other areas may get lighter/ 
darker, too, so just keep an eye on that 
while you're adjusting. In the example 
shown here, I clicked and dragged up- 
ward to brighten up that shadowy area 
on the left, and the curve adjusted to 
make that happen automatically. 

(Continued) 



The Essentials of Camera Raw 



Chapter 2 



041 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Nine: 

Before we finish up with curves, there's 
another new feature in the CS6 version 
of Camera Raw, and that's the ability to 
tweak the individual RGB curves in the 
Point curve. Although this works great 
for creating cross-processing effects 
(which we'll cover in a moment), you'll 
probably wind up using it most for fix- 
ing tough white balance problems (like 
a color cast that just won't go away). 
You choose which channel you want to 
adjust by going to the Point tab, and 
then choosing the individual channel 
from the Channel pop-up menu (as 
shown here, where I'm choosing Blue 
to help me remove a color cast from 
the background and her skin — the 
background is supposed to be solid 
gray, and her skin isn't supposed to 
be bluish). 



Step 10: 

So, now that you have just the Blue 
channel selected (notice that the Curve 
readout is now tinted blue, as well, as a 
visual cue to you that you're adjusting just 
this one channel), how do you know which 
part of the curve to adjust? You can get 
Camera Raw to tell you exactly which part 
to adjust. Move your cursor over the back- 
ground area you want to affect, press- 
and-hold the Command (PC: Ctrl) key, 
and your cursor temporarily changes into 
the Eyedropper tool. Click once on your 
image and it adds a point to the curve 
that corresponds to the area you want to 
adjust. Now, click on that curve point and 
drag at a 45° angle down toward the bot- 
tom-right corner, and it removes the blue 
from the background (as seen here). 





4L- 




► 042 



Chapter 2 



The Essentials of Camera Raw 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 




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Step 11: 

If you want to use these RGB curves to 
create a cross-processing effect (a classic 
darkroom technique from the film days, 
but still popular today, especially in fash- 
ion photography), it's actually fairly easy. 
There are dozens of different combina- 
tions, but here's one I like: Start by choos- 
ing Red in the Point tab's Channel pop-up 
menu, and create kind of a steep S-curve 
shape by clicking three times along the 
diagonal curve (once in the center, once at 
the next grid line above, and once below), 
so they're evenly spaced along the line. 
Now, leave the center point where it is, 
drag the top point straight upward, and 
drag the bottom point straight down to 
create the curve you see here at the far 
left. Then, switch to the Green channel 
and make another three-point S-curve, 
but one that's not as steep (as seen here, 
in the center). Lastly, go to the Blue chan- 
nel, don't add any points, and just drag 
the bottom-left point straight upward 
along the left edge (as shown here 
at right) and drag the top-right point 
down along the right edge. 



Step 12: 

Of course, based on the particular image 
you use, you might have to tweak these 
settings a bit (usually, it's the amount you 
drag in the Blue channel, but again, it 
depends on the photo you're applying 
it to). If you come up with a setting you 
like, don't forget to save it as a preset in 
the Preset panel (just like you did with 
your Mega Contrast curve earlier). 



The Essentials of Camera Raw 



Chapter 2 



043 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Cropping and 
Straightening 



There's a distinct advantage to cropping your photo here in Camera Raw, rather 
than in Photoshop CS6 itself, and that is you can return to Camera Raw later and 
bring back the uncropped version of the image. This even holds true for JPEG and 
TIFF photos, as long as you haven't overwritten the original JPEG or TIFF file. 
To avoid overwriting, when you save the JPEG or TIFF in Photoshop, just change 
the filename (that way the original stays intact). With RAW images, you don't have 
to worry about that, because it doesn't let you overwrite the original. 



Step One: 

The Crop tool (C) is the sixth tool from 
the left in the toolbar. By default, you 
click-and-drag it out around the area 
you want to keep, and like in Photoshop, 
you have access to a list of preset crop- 
ping ratios. To get them, click-and-hold 
on the Crop tool and a pop-up menu 
will appear (as shown here). The Normal 
setting gives you the standard drag-it- 
where-you-want-it cropping. However, if 
you choose one of the cropping presets, 
then your cropping is constrained to a 
specific ratio. For example, choose the 
2 to 3 ratio, click-and-drag it out, and 
you'll see that it keeps the same aspect 
ratio as your original uncropped photo. 



Step Two: 

Here's the 2-to-3-ratio cropping border 
dragged out over my image. The area to 
be cropped away appears dimmed, and 
the clear area inside the border is how 
your final cropped photo will appear. 
If you want to see the cropped version 
before you leave Camera Raw, just switch 
to another tool in the toolbar. {Note: If 
you draw a set size cropping border and 
want to switch orientation, click on the 
bottom-right corner and drag down and 
to the left to switch from wide to tall, 
or up and to the right to switch from 
tall to wide.) 



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The Essentials of Camera Raw 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



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Step Three: 

If you re-open your cropped photo again 
in Camera Raw, you'll see the cropped 
version. To bring back the cropping bor- 
der, just click on the Crop tool. To remove 
the cropping altogether, press the Esc or 
Delete (PC: Backspace) key on your key- 
board (or choose Clear Crop from the 
Crop tool's pop-up menu). If you want 
your photo cropped to an exact size (like 
8x10", 13x19", etc.), choose Custom from 
the Crop tool's pop-up menu to bring up 
the dialog you see here. You can choose 
to crop by inches, pixels, or centimeters. 



Step Four: 

Here, we're going to create a custom 
crop so our photo winds up being ex- 
actly 8x10", so choose Inches from the 
Crop pop-up menu, then type in your 
custom size. Click OK, click-and-drag 
out the cropping border, and the area 
inside it will be exactly 8x10". Click on 
any other tool in the toolbar or press 
Return (PC: Enter), and you'll see the 
final cropped 8x10" image. If you click 
the Open Image button, the image is 
cropped to your specs and opened 
in Photoshop. If, instead, you click the 
Done button, Camera Raw closes and 
your photo is untouched, but it keeps 
your cropping border in place for 
the future. 

TIP: Seeing Image Size 

The size of your photo (and other infor- 
mation) is displayed below the Preview 
area of Camera Raw (in blue underlined 
text that looks like a web link). When you 
drag out a cropping border, the size info 
for the photo automatically updates to 
display the dimensions of the currently 
selected crop area. 

(Continued) 



The Essentials of Camera Raw 



Chapter 2 



045 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

If you save a cropped JPEG or TIFF 
photo out of Camera Raw (by clicking 
the Done button), the only way to bring 
back those cropped areas is to reopen 
the photo in Camera Raw. However, if 
you click the Save Image button and 
you choose Photoshop from the Format 
pop-up menu (as shown), a new option 
will appear called Preserve Cropped 
Pixels. If you turn on that checkbox be- 
fore you click Save, when you open this 
cropped photo in Photoshop, it will ap- 
pear to be cropped, but the photo will 
be on a separate layer (not flattened on 
the Background layer). So the cropped 
area is still there — it just extends off the 
visible image area. You can bring that 
cropped area back by clicking-and-drag- 
ging your photo within the image area 
(try it — use the Move tool [V] to click- 
and-drag your photo to the right or left 
and you'll see what I mean). 



Step Six: 

If you have a number of similar photos 
you need to crop the same way, you're 
going to love this: First, select all the 
photos you want to crop in Camera Raw 
(either in Mini Bridge or on your com- 
puter), then open them all in Camera 
Raw. When you open multiple photos, 
they appear in a vertical filmstrip along 
the left side of Camera Raw (as shown 
here). Click on the Select All button (it's 
above the filmstrip) and then crop the 
currently selected photo as you'd like. 
As you apply your cropping, look at the 
filmstrip and you'll see all the thumbnails 
update with their new cropping instruc- 
tions. A tiny Crop icon will also appear in 
the bottom-left corner of each thumbnail, 
letting you know that these photos have 
been cropped in Camera Raw. 



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Chapter 2 



The Essentials of Camera Raw 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



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Step Seven: 

Another form of cropping is actually 
straightening your photos using the 
Straighten tool. It's a close cousin of 
the Crop tool because what it does is 
essentially rotates your cropping border, 
so when you open the photo, it's straight. 
In the Camera Raw toolbar, choose the 
Straighten tool (it's immediately to the 
right of the Crop tool and shown circled 
here in red). Now, click-and-drag it along 
the horizon line in your photo (as shown 
here). When you release the mouse but- 
ton, a cropping border appears and that 
border is automatically rotated to the 
exact amount needed to straighten the 
photo (as shown in Step Eight). 



Step Eight: 

You won't actually see the straight- 
ened photo until you switch tools, press 
Return (PC: Enter), or open the photo 
in Photoshop (which means, if you click 
Save Image or Done, Camera Raw closes, 
and the straightening information is saved 
along with the file. So if you open this 
file again in Camera Raw, you'll see the 
straightened version, and you won't re- 
ally know it was ever crooked). If you click 
Open Image instead, the straightened 
photo opens in Photoshop. Again, if this 
is a RAW photo (or if it's a JPEG or TIFF 
and you clicked the Done button), you can 
always return to Camera Raw and remove 
this cropping border to get the original 
uncropped photo back. 

TIP: Canceling Your Straightening 

If you want to cancel your straightening, 
just press the Esc key on your keyboard, 
and the straightening border will go away. 



The Essentials of Camera Raw 



Chapter 2 



047 < 



The Adobe Photoshop CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Photoshop Killer Tips 



Skipping the Camera Raw 
Window Altogether 

If you've already applied a set of tweaks 
to a RAW photo, you probably don't need 
the Camera Raw editing window opening 
every time you open the file. So, just press- 
and-hold the Shift key when you double- 
click on the RAW file in Mini Bridge, and 
the image will open in Photoshop, with the 
last set of edits already applied, skipping 
the Camera Raw window altogether. If you 
didn't apply any tweaks in Camera Raw, it 
just opens with the Camera Raw defaults 
applied. Either way, it's a big time saver. 

Handy Shortcuts for Blend Modes 

Most people wind up using the same 
handful of layer blend modes — Multiply, 
Screen, Overlay, Hard Light, and Soft 
Light. If those sound like your favorites, 
you can save yourself some time by jump- 
ing directly to the one you want using a 
simple keyboard shortcut. For example, 
to jump directly to Screen mode, you'd 
press Option-Shift-S (PC: Alt-Shift-S), 
for Multiply mode, you'd press Option- 
Shift-M (PC: Alt-Shift-M), and so on. To 
run through the different shortcuts, just 
try different letters on your keyboard. 



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Seeing a True Before/After 

The weird thing about the way Camera 
Raw handles previews is it does them on 
a panel-by-panel basis, so if you make 
a bunch of changes in the Basic panel, 
then switch to the Detail panel and make 
changes there, when you turn off the 
Preview checkbox (on the top right of the 
Preview area), it doesn't give you a real 
before/after. It just gives you a before/after 
of the panel you're in right now, which 
doesn't give you a true before/after of your 
image editing. To get a real before/after 
of all your edits in Camera Raw, click on 
the Presets icon (the second icon from the 
right near the top of the Panel area) or 



Preview 



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the Snapshots icon (the far right icon), and 
now when you toggle on/off the Preview 
checkbox, it shows you the real before/after. 

Don't Get Fooled by 
the Default Button 

If you've edited your image in Camera 
Raw, and then you decide you want to 
start over, clicking the Default button in 



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Auto button) won't return your image 
to how it looked when you opened it. 
Instead, to get back to the original way 
your image looked when you first opened 
it in Camera Raw, go to the Camera Raw 
flyout menu and choose Camera Raw 
Defaults. You can also press-and-hold 
the Option (PC: Alt) key, and the Cancel 
button will change to a Reset button. 

Deleting Multiple Images 
While Editing in Camera Raw 

If you have more than one image 
open in Camera Raw, you can mark 
any of them you want to be deleted 
by selecting them (in the filmstrip on 
the left side of Camera Raw), then 
pressing the Delete key on your key- 
board. A red "X" will appear on those 
images. When you're done in Camera 
Raw, click on the Done button, and 
those images marked to be deleted 
will be moved to the Trash (PC: Recycle 
Bin) automatically. To remove the mark 
for deletion, just select them and press 
the Delete key again. 




► 048 



Chapter 2 



The Essentials of Camera Raw 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



Photoshop Killer Tips 



Cool Raw Retouching Trick 

There's a pretty common retouching 
technique in Photoshop for reducing hot 
spots (shiny areas on a subject's face), 
which uses the Healing Brush to com- 
pletely remove the hot spot, then under 
the Edit menu, you choose Fade Healing 
Brush, and lower the Opacity there. A 
little hint of the hot spot comes back, 
so it looks more like a highlight than a 
shine (it actually works really well). You 
can do something similar in Camera Raw 
when using the Spot Removal tool (set to 
Heal) by removing the hot spot (or freckle, 
or wrinkle) and then using the Opacity 
slider in the Spot Removal options panel. 

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Opacity 




Get a Larger Preview Area 

If you have multiple images open in 
Camera Raw, and need more room to 
see the preview of the image you're 
currently working on, just double-click 
right on that little divider that separates 
the filmstrip from the Preview area, and 



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the filmstrip tucks in over to the left, out 
of the way, giving you a larger preview. 
To bring it back, just double-click on that 
divider again (it's now over on the far-left 
side of the Camera Raw window) and it 
pops back out. 



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add or change star ratings. If you've got 
multiple images open, you can do it right 
in Camera Raw. Just press Command-1, 
-2, -3 (PC: Ctrl-1, -2, -3), and so on, to add 
star ratings (up to five stars). You can also 
just click directly on the five little dots that 
appear below the thumbnails in the film- 
strip on the left. 

Rule-of-Thirds Cropping 

This one Adobe borrowed from Camera 
Raw's sister program Photoshop Lightroom, 
because (like in Lightroom) you can have 
the "Rule-of-Thirds" grid appear over your 
cropping border anytime by just clicking- 
and-holding on the Crop tool in the tool- 
bar, then choosing Show Overlay. 



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Jump to Full Screen Mode 
in Camera Raw 

If you want to see your image in Cam- 
era Raw as large as possible, just press 
the F key, and Camera Raw expands to 
Full Screen mode, with the window filling 
your monitor, giving you a larger look at 
your image. 

Shortcut for Viewing Sharpening 

The best zoom magnification to view your 
sharpening in 
Camera Raw is a 
100% view, and 
the quickest way 
to get there is to 
just double-click 
the Zoom tool. 

Don't Know Where to Start When 
Editing an Image? Try Auto Levels 
or Curves (They're Better in CS6) 

In Photoshop CS6, Adobe greatly im- 
proved the results of the Auto button 
found in the Levels and Curves adjust- 
ment layer settings in the Properties panel, 
as well as in the Levels and Curves adjust- 
ment dialogs. It often actually makes a 
pretty decent starting point for editing 
your image, especially if you have a tricky 
image and you're not sure where to start. 



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Chapter 3 Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 




Raw Justice 

camera raw — beyond the basics 



When I searched The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) 
for movies or TV shows containing the word "Raw," I was 
pleasantly surprised to find out just how many choices 
I actually had. However, I went with the 1994 movie Raw 
Justice, but I don't want you to think for one minute that 
I was influenced in any way by the fact that the star of the 
movie was Pamela Anderson. That would be incredibly 
shallow of me. Like any serious movie buff, I was drawn to 
this movie by what drew most of the audience to this movie: 
actor Robert Hays (who could forget his role in 2007's Nicky's 
Birthday Camera or the Michael Tuchner-directed film 
Trenchcoat). Of course, the fact that Stacey Keach was in 
the movie was just the icing on the cake, but everybody 
knows the real draw of this flick clearly was Hays. However, 
what I found most puzzling was this: in the movie poster, 
Pamela Anderson totally dominates the poster with a large, 



full-color, %-length pose of her wearing a skimpy black 
dress, thigh-high boots, and holding a pistol at her side, 
yet the other actors appear only as tiny black-and-white, 
backscreened headshots. I have to admit, this really puzzles 
me, because while Pamela Anderson is a fine actress — 
one of the best, in fact — I feel, on some level, they were 
trying to fool you into watching a movie thinking it was 
about Pamela Anderson's acting, when in fact it was 
really about the acting eye candy that is Hays. This is 
called "bait and switch" (though you probably are more 
familiar with the terms "tuck and roll" or perhaps "Bartles 
& Jaymes"). Anyway, I think, while "Raw Justice" makes 
a great title for a chapter on going beyond the basics 
of Camera Raw, there is no real justice in that this finely 
crafted classic of modern cinematography wound up 
going straight to DVD. 



051 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Double-Processing 
to Create the 
Uncapturable 



As good as digital cameras have become these days, when it comes to exposure, 
the human eye totally kicks their butt. That's why we shoot so many photos where 
our subject is backlit, because with our naked eye we can see the subject just fine 
(our eye adjusts). But when we open the photo, the subject is basically in silhouette. 
Or how about sunsets, where we have to choose which part of the scene to expose 
for — the ground or the sky — because our camera can't expose for both? Well, here's 
how to use Camera Raw to overcome this exposure limitation: 



Step One: 

Open the photo you want to double- 
process. In this example, the camera 
properly exposed for the sky in the back- 
ground, so the rock formation in the 
foreground is a silhouette. Of course, 
our goal is to create something more like 
what our eye sees, but our camera can't — 
a photo where both the foreground rocks 
and the sky are each exposed properly. 
Plus, by double-processing (editing the 
same RAW photo twice), we can choose 
one set of edits for the sky and another 
for the rocks, to create just what we want. 



Step Two: 

Let's start by making the rocks visible. 
Drag the Shadows slider all the way to 
the right, and now at least you can see 
them, but it's still not enough, so you'll 
have to bump up the Exposure slider, as 
well (here, I've dragged it over to +1.00). 
The rocks look kind of "flat" contrast- 
wise, so bump up the Contrast a bit, 
too (let's go to +28). Lastly, since these 
are rocks, and we want to accentuate 
their texture, let's crank the Clarity up 
to around +40, and then make the little 
bit of color that's there more vibrant 
by increasing the Vibrance to around 
+37. Now, press-and-hold the Shift key, 
and the Open button changes to Open 
Object (as seen here). Click it. 



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► 052 



Chapter 3 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 




Disabie Layer Mask 
Enable Vector Mask 
Create Clipping Mask 




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Step Three: 

Clicking Open Object makes your image 
open in Photoshop as a smart object 
(you'll see the layer thumbnail has a little 
page icon in the bottom-right corner). 
Now we need a second version of this 
image, because the sky looks way too 
light in this version. In our second version 
of this RAW file, we'll focus on just the 
sky. If you were to duplicate the layer by 
dragging it onto the Create a New Layer 
icon, the double-processing wouldn't 
work. That's because the duplicate layer 
would be tied to the original layer, so 
any changes you made to the duplicate 
would also automatically be applied to 
the original layer. We need to be able to 
edit these two layers separately from 
each other. Basically, we need to break 
the link between the two layers. To do 
that, go to the Layers panel, Right- 
click on the layer, and from the pop-up 
menu that appears, choose New Smart 
Object via Copy. This gives you a dupli- 
cate layer, but breaks the link to the origi- 
nal layer. 



Step Four: 

Now, double-click directly on this dupli- 
cate layer's thumbnail and it opens this 
duplicate in Camera Raw. Here, you're 
going to expose for the sky, without any 
regard for how the foreground looks 
(it will turn really dark, but who cares — 
you've already got a version with it prop- 
erly exposed on its own separate layer, 
right?). So, drag the Exposure slider way 
over to the left (I went to -0.85), and drag 
the Highlights slider to -23 to help darken 
the sky. I also dragged the Temperature 
and Tint sliders a little to the right to 
warm the color of the sky, and lastly, 
I increased the Clarity to +35 (it made 
the clouds look a little more interesting). 
Once the sky looks good, click OK. 

(Continued) 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



Chapter 3 



053 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

You now have two versions of your photo, 
each on a different layer — the brighter 
one exposed for the rocks in the fore- 
ground on the bottom layer, and the 
darker sky version on the layer directly on 
top of it — and they are perfectly aligned, 
one on top of the other. This is why we 
call it "double-processing," because you 
have two versions of the same image, 
each processed differently. Now what 
we need to do is combine these two dif- 
ferent layers (with different exposures) 
into one single image that combines the 
best of both. It'll be easier if we have the 
image with the properly exposed rocks 
as our top layer, so click on that layer and 
drag it above the darker sky layer (as seen 
here). We'll combine the images with a 
layer mask, but rather than painstakingly 
painting it, we can cheat and use the 
Quick Selection tool (W). So, get it from 
the Toolbox and paint over the rocks and 
foreground, and it selects them for you in 
just a few seconds (as shown here). 



Step Six: 

Go to the Layers panel and click on the 
Add Layer Mask icon at the bottom of 
the panel (shown circled here in red). 
This converts your selection into a layer 
mask, which hides the light sky and re- 
veals the new darker sky layer in its 
place (as seen here). It still needs some 
tweaking (for sure), but at least now 
you can see what we're aiming for — the 
brighter foreground rocks from one layer 
blended with the darker sky from the 
other layer. 





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► 054 



Chapter 3 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS( 



for Digital Photographer: 





Step Seven: 

Now, you're going to lower the Opacity 
of this top layer (the brighter rocks layer), 
so it blends in a little better with the 
darker sky layer. Here, I've lowered it to 
77%, and the colors match much better. 
Well, except for those blue mountain 
areas on either side of the base of the 
rocks, which look kind of funky. They're 
too bright, and a bit "glowy." We're 
going to have to fix that. Uggh! 

TIP: Always Opening Your Images 
as Smart Objects 

If you always want your RAW-processed 
images to open as smart objects, click 
on the workflow options link at the bot- 
tom of the Camera Raw dialog (the blue 
text below the Preview area), and when 
the dialog appears, turn on the Open in 
Photoshop as Smart Objects checkbox. 



Step Eight: 

Press the letter B to get the Brush tool, 
then click on the Brush icon in the Options 
Bar and choose a medium-sized, soft- 
edged brush from the Brush Picker. Also, 
to help blend this a little better, lower the 
Opacity of the brush (up in the Options 
Bar) to just 50%. Now, press D, then X to 
set your Foreground color to black, start 
painting over those blue mountain areas 
on the sides of the photo, and it paints 
back in 50% of the darker image, so it 
helps to hide those areas without making 
them solid black. If you make a mistake, 
switch your Foreground color to white 
and paint over your mistake to erase 
the spillover. 



(Continued) 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics Chapter 3 055 i 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Nine: 

Now, we have a pretty common problem 
to deal with here: along the edge, where 
the brighter rocks meet the darker sky, 
there's a little bit of a white fringe happen- 
ing (I zoomed in here to 100%, so you can 
see it better). Luckily, that's fairly easy to 
fix, without having to take a tiny brush and 
paint all along that edge (which is how we 
used to do it, and we still sometimes do 
that for a little touch-up, but this isn't 
a little touch-up). 



Step 10: 

We're going to shift the edge of our 
mask a few pixels, so you don't see that 
white edge fringe any longer, and we'll 
let Photoshop do all the heavy lifting. 
Go under the Select menu and choose 
Refine Mask. This brings up the Refine 
Mask dialog you see here. First, to make 
seeing this white edge easier, from the 
View pop-up menu up top, choose On 
Black and now it really stands out, so you 
can see it clearly for what you're going to 
do next. In the Edge Detection section, 
turn on the Smart Radius checkbox and 
drag the Radius slider to the right until 
the white edge is almost gone (I dragged 
to 8.2). Then, under Adjust Edge, drag 
the Shift Edge slider to the left (as shown 
here) until the white edge disappears (as 
you see here, where I dragged to -25), 
then click OK. See, that was fairly easy. 
Again, if after doing this, you still notice 
a white pixel or two here or there, just 
take a very small brush (you're still at 50% 
Opacity with this brush) and simply paint 
over it to hide it. 



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► 056 



Chapter 3 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



: 



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Step 11: 

Now, let's finish this baby off. Go to the 
Layers panel and, from the flyout menu 
at the top right, choose Flatten Image to 
flatten the image down to one layer. The 
image looks a little dark overall, so press 
Command-L (PC: Ctrl-L) to bring up the 
Levels dialog, and bring back some of 
the overall highlights by dragging the 
white Input Levels highlights slider (right 
below the far-right side of the histogram) 
to the left to brighten things up. 

Step 12: 

Lastly, I would do something to make 
the image a little more vibrant (and 
applying an effect to the combined 
image helps unify the look). You could 
reopen the image in Camera Raw (it's 
not a smart object any longer, so you'd 
have to do it the old-fashioned way — 
see page 18). Instead, let's do a quick 
Lab Color move. Go under the Image 
menu, under Mode, and choose Lab 
Color. Now, go under the Image menu 
again and choose Apply Image. When 
the dialog appears, in the Source section, 
choose the "a" channel, then change your 
Blending mode to Soft Light. This adds 
color and contrast. Click OK, and then 
go back under the Image menu, under 
Mode, and switch back to RGB Color. 





Before 



After 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



Chapter 3 



057 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Editing Multiple 
Photos at Once 



One of the biggest advantages of using Camera Raw is that it enables you 
to apply changes to one photo, and then easily apply those exact same 
changes to a bunch of other similar photos taken in the same approximate 
setting. It's a form of built-in automation, and it can save you an incredible 
amount of time when editing your shoots. 



Step One: 

The key to making this work is that the 
photos you edit all are shot in similar 
lighting conditions, or all have some 
similar problem. In this case, our photos 
are of a vintage airplane at the Sun 'n Fun 
International Fly-In & Expo, and they're 
a little underexposed. In Mini Bridge, 
start by selecting the images you want 
to edit (click on one, press-and-hold the 
Command [PC: Ctrl] key, then click on 
all the others). If they're RAW images, 
just double-click on any one of them 
and they open in Camera Raw, but if 
they're JPEG or TIFF images, you'll need 
to select them, switch to Review mode, 
and then press Option-R (PC: Alt-R). 



Step Two: 

When the images open in Camera Raw, 
you'll see a filmstrip along the left side 
of the window with all the images you 
selected. Now, there are two ways to 
do this and, while neither one is wrong, 
I think the second method is faster (which 
you'll see in a moment). We'll start with 
the first: Click on an image in the film- 
strip, then make any adjustments you 
want to make this one image look good 
(I tweaked the Temperature, Exposure, 
Contrast, Blacks, and Clarity to brighten 
it and make it more contrasty). 





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► 058 



Chapter 3 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



: 








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Once you've got one of the photos 
looking good, click the Select All but- 
ton up at the top of the filmstrip to 
select all the photos (even though it 
selects the rest of the photos, you'll no- 
tice that the image you edited is actu- 
ally the "most selected" image, with a 
highlight border around it). Now click 
the Synchronize button (it's right below 
the Select All button) to bring up the 
Synchronize dialog (seen here). It shows 
you a list of all the things you could 
copy from this "most selected" photo 
and apply to the rest of the selected 
photos. Choose Basic from the pop- 
up menu at the top, and it unchecks all 
the other stuff, and leaves just the Basic 
panel checkboxes turned on. 



Step Four: 

When you click the OK button, it applies 
the Basic panel settings from the "most 
selected" photo to all the rest of the 
selected photos (if you look in the film- 
strip, you'll see that all the photos have 
had those settings adjusted). Okay, so 
why don't I like this method? Although it 
does work, it takes too many clicks, and 
decisions, and checkboxes, which is why 
I prefer the second method. 

TIP: Editing Only Select Photos 

If you only want certain photos to be 
affected, and not all the ones open 
in Camera Raw, then in the filmstrip, 
Command-click (PC: Ctrl-click) on only 
the photos you want affected and click 
the Synchronize button. 

(Continued) 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



Chapter 3 



059 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

In the second method, as soon as 
Camera Raw opens, click the Select All 
button to select all your images, then 
go ahead and make your changes. As 
you make the changes to your "most 
selected" photo, all the others are up- 
dated with your new settings almost 
instantly, so you don't have to remem- 
ber which settings you applied — when 
you move one slider, all the images get 
the same treatment, so you don't need 
the Synchronize dialog at all. Try out 
both methods and see which one you 
like, but if you feel the need for speed, 
you'll probably like the second one 
much better. 




► 060 



Chapter 3 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



If you shoot in JPEG, your digital camera applies sharpening to your photo right in 
the camera itself, so no sharpening is automatically applied by Camera Raw. But if 
you shoot in RAW, you're telling your camera to ignore that sharpening, and that's 
why, when you bring a RAW image into Camera Raw, by default, it applies some 
sharpening, called "capture sharpening." In my workflow, I sharpen twice: once here 
in Camera Raw, and once more right before I output my final image from Photoshop 
(called "output sharpening"). Here's how to apply capture sharpening in Camera Raw: 



Sharpening in 
Camera Raw 




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Step One: 

When you open a RAW image in 
Camera Raw, by default, it applies a 
small amount of sharpening to your 
photo (not the JPEGs or TIFFs, only RAW 
images). You can adjust this amount (or 
turn it off altogether, if you like) by clicking 
on the Detail icon (it's the third icon from 
the left) at the top of the Panel area, or 
using the keyboard shortcut Command- 
Option-3 (PC: Ctrl-Alt-3). At the top of 
this panel is the Sharpening section, where 
by a quick glance you can see that sharp- 
ening has already been applied to your 
photo. If you don't want any sharpen- 
ing applied at this stage (it's a personal 
preference), then simply click-and-drag 
the Amount slider all the way to the left 
to lower the amount of sharpening to 
(zero), and the sharpening is removed. 



Step Two: 

If you want to turn off this automatic, by 
default sharpening (so capture sharpen- 
ing is only applied if you go and manually 
add it yourself), first set the Sharpening 
Amount slider to (zero), then go to the 
Camera Raw flyout menu and choose 
Save New Camera Raw Defaults (as 
shown here). Now, RAW images taken 
with that camera will not be automati- 
cally sharpened. 

(Continued) 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



Chapter 3 



061 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Three: 

Before we charge into sharpening, 
there's one more thing you'll want to 
know: if you don't actually want sharpen- 
ing applied, but you'd still like to see what 
the sharpened image would look like, 
you can sharpen just the preview, and not 
the actual file. Just press Command-K 
(PC: Ctrl-K) while Camera Raw is open, 
and in the Camera Raw Preferences dia- 
log, choose Preview Images Only from 
the Apply Sharpening To pop-up menu 
(as shown here), and then click OK to 
save this as your default. Now the sharp- 
ening only affects the preview you see 
here in Camera Raw, but when you 
choose to open the file in Photoshop, 
the sharpening is not applied. 



Step Four: 

If you've been using Camera Raw for a 
while now, you probably remember back 
to older versions of Photoshop where you 
had to view your image at 100% to really 
see any effects of the sharpening. They 
pretty much fixed that back in CS5, so 
it's not as necessary to be at a 100% size 
view, but it still seems to me to render 
the most accurate view of the sharpening. 
The quickest way to jump to that 100% 
view is to double-click directly on the 
Zoom tool in the toolbar (shown circled 
here). (Note: You'll see a message about 
zooming to 100% at the bottom of the 
Detail panel, but it'll disappear after you 
zoom into 100%.) 



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Chapter 3 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 





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Step Five: 

Dipping into the realm of the painfully 
obvious, dragging the Amount slider to 
the right increases the amount of sharp- 
ening. Compare the image shown here, 
with the one in Step Four (where the 
Sharpening Amount was set to 0), and 
you can see how much sharper the image 
now appears, where I dragged it to 100. 



Step Six: 

The next slider down is the Radius slider, 
which determines how far out the sharp- 
ening is applied from the edges being 
sharpened in your photo. This pretty much 
works like the Radius slider in Photoshop's 
Unsharp Mask filter, which is probably 
why the default is 1 (because that's prob- 
ably where we'll leave it most of the time). 
I use less than a Radius of 1 if the photo 
I'm processing is only going to be used 
on a website, in video editing, or some- 
where where it's going to be at a very 
small size or resolution. I only use a Radius 
of more than 1 when: (1) the image is vis- 
ibly blurry, (2) it has lots of detail (like this 
photo, where I pushed the Radius to 1.2), 
so it can take some serious sharpening, or 
(3) the image needs some "emergency" 
sharpening. If you decide to increase 
the Radius amount above 1 (unlike the 
Unsharp Mask filter, you can only go as 
high as 3 here), just be careful, because 
if you go too much above 1, your photo 
can start to look fake, oversharpened, or 
even noisy, so be careful out there (in the 
next step, I set it back to 1). 

(Continued) 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



Chapter 3 



063 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Seven: 

The next slider down is the Detail slider, 
which determines how much of the edge 
areas are affected by sharpening. You'll 
apply lower amounts of Detail if your 
photo is slightly blurred, and higher 
amounts if you really want to bring out 
texture and detail (which is why this slider 
is aptly named). So, how much Detail 
you apply depends on the subject you're 
sharpening. With an image like this one, 
with lots of metal and texture in the deck, 
it's an ideal candidate for a high amount 
of Detail (so are most landscapes, city- 
scapes, motorcycle shots — stuff with lots 
of edges), so I dragged the slider to the 
right (all the way to 78), until the detail 
really came out. 



Step Eight: 

I'm going to change photos to show 
you the Masking slider. This one's easier 
to understand, and for many people, 
I think it will become invaluable. Here's 
why: When you apply sharpening, it gets 
applied to the entire image evenly. But 
what if you have an image where there 
are areas you'd like sharpened, but other 
softer areas that you'd like left alone (like 
the photo here, where you want to keep 
her skin soft, but have her eyes, lips, etc., 
sharpened)? If we weren't in Camera 
Raw, you could apply the Unsharp Mask 
filter to a duplicate layer, add a layer 
mask, and paint away (cover) those softer 
areas, right? Well, that's kind of what 
the Masking slider here in Camera Raw 
does — as you drag it to the right, it re- 
duces the amount of sharpening on non- 
edge areas. The default Masking setting 
of (zero) applies sharpening to the en- 
tire image. As you drag to the right, the 
non-edge areas are masked (protected) 
from being sharpened. 



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► 064 



Chapter 3 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 






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Step Nine: 

All four sliders in the Sharpening section 
of the Detail panel let you have a live pre- 
view of what the sharpening is affecting — 
just press-and-hold the Option (PC: Alt) 
key as you drag; your screen will turn gray- 
scale, and the areas that the slider you're 
dragging will affect appear as edge areas 
in the Preview area. This is particularly 
helpful in understanding the Masking 
slider, so press-and-hold the Option key 
and drag the Masking slider to the right. 
When Masking is set to 0, the screen turns 
solid white (because sharpening is being 
evenly applied to everything). As you drag 
to the right, in the preview (shown here), 
the parts that are no longer being sharp- 
ened turn black (those areas are masked). 
Any areas you see in white are the only 
parts of the photo receiving sharpening 
(perfect for sharpening women, because it 
avoids sharpening their skin, but sharpens 
the things you want sharp, like the eyes, 
hair, eyebrows, lips, edges of her face, and 
so on). Below is a before/after of our boat 
deck shot, with these settings — Amount: 
100, Radius: 1, Detail: 78, Masking: 0. 




Before 



After 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



Chapter 3 



065 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Automatically 

Fixing Lens 

Problems 



Earlier versions of Camera Raw have had lens correction features, but Camera 
Raw can now automatically apply corrections for common lens problems (like 
barrel or/and pin-cushion distortion, or edge vignetting). It does this by reading 
the embedded camera data (so it knows which camera and lens you used), and it 
applies a profile to fix the problem. It's amazingly fast, and it takes just one check- 
box, but what if there is no profile for your camera/lens, or there's no EXIF data for 
your image (maybe you scanned it), or if you don't like the profile (it was too little 
or too much)? You're about to learn all of that. 



Step One: 

Open the image with a lens problem in 
Camera Raw. Now, if you've been using 
Photoshop for a while, you already know 
there's a Lens Correction filter found 
under Photoshop's Filter menu, and 
they've updated that with pretty much 
the same features as the Camera Raw 
version, but it's better to do the correc- 
tion here because: (1) it's non-destructive, 
and (2) it's faster. So I always fix lens 
problems here, rather than using the 
Photoshop filter. 



Step Two: 

Click on the Lens Corrections icon (the 
fifth icon from the right at the top of the 
Panel area) and on the Profile tab, turn 
on the Enable Lens Profile Corrections 
checkbox. Now, chances are that you're 
done. Boom. It's fixed. That's because, 
as I said above, it looks at the camera 
data embedded in the shot to find out 
which camera and lens you used, then it 
searches its internal database for a pro- 
file of that lens, and it immediately fixes 
the photo (as seen here). If it can't find a 
profile, it lets you know at the bottom of 
the panel (as seen in the next step). Also, 
I usually have to back down the amount 
of correction just a bit with fisheye lenses 
by dragging the Distortion slider a little 
bit to the left (as seen here). 



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► 066 



Chapter 3 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



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Step Three: 

So, what happens in a case like this, 
where you open a photo and it can't 
find a profile automatically, or the image 
doesn't have any embedded EXIF data 
(for example, if you're trying to fix a 
scanned image, or an image you copied- 
and-pasted from another document)? 
Take a look at the photo here. Camera 
Raw couldn't find a profile for it, so in 
the Lens Profile section, the Make is 
set to None and the Model and Profile 
pop-up menus are grayed out. What this 
really means is that you have to help it 
out by telling it what equipment you 
used to take the photo (if you know), 
or you'll have to make your best guess 
(if you don't). 



Step Four: 

I shoot Nikon cameras, so I pretty much 
knew this was taken with a Nikon, so 
from the Make field I chose Nikon, and 
as soon as I did, it did the rest — it found 
a lens match and fixed the photo. Now, 
it's not always 100% sure it has the right 
lens match, so it gives you a list of lenses 
it thinks might be right. You can click on 
the Model pop-up menu, and you'll see 
a list of lenses it thinks it could be (as seen 
here). You can try out any of the other 
lenses listed there and see if it gives 
you a better result than the one that 
it chose for you (it does a surprisingly 
good job, so I usually wind up using the 
one it chose, but every once in a while 
I find a lens in that list I like better, even 
though sometimes I know it's not the 
actual lens I used). Here, I actually used 
the 10.5mm fisheye lens, so I chose that 
from the pop-up menu. 

(Continued) 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



Chapter 3 



067 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

Our last two images were taken with a 
10.5mm fisheye lens, but now let's look 
at a situation where the lens problem is 
so large, a built-in profile alone isn't going 
to get the job done. Take at look at the 
image shown here, where the building 
and tower look like they're leaning in to- 
ward the center (look at how the tower 
on the left side is leaning to the right). 
This is a pretty common problem for pho- 
tos taken with a wide-angle lens on a 
full-frame camera (this was taken with a 
28-300mm lens, at 28mm). Besides the 
lens distortion problems (look at the foun- 
dation — how it bends up on the left side), 
this image has lens vignetting (darkening) 
in all four corners, it's way underexposed, 
and it's lacking contrast in a big way. 
I kind of like the mystery of the fog, but 
it is just kind of a mess overall. 



Step Six: 

Let's start by quickly fixing the exposure 
and contrast, because it's really distract- 
ing. We can fix this in just a few clicks. 
When something is this underexposed 
and flat-looking (lacking contrast), it's a 
perfect candidate for a click on the Auto 
button, so start there. It actually looks 
okay, but let's just use that as a starting 
point. Now, add more contrast by drag- 
ging the Contrast slider over to +20, then 
drag the Blacks slider down to -50 to 
keep the shadows from looking washed 
out, and lastly, crank up that Clarity a 
bunch (here, I dragged it over to +71 
to really bring out the detail). We still 
have some nasty edge vignetting, but 
we'll fix that next. 





► 068 



Chapter 3 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



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Step Seven: 

Click on the Lens Corrections icon 
and turn on the Enable Lens Profile 
Corrections checkbox (at the top of 
the Profile tab). It looks at the camera 
data embedded into your photo and, if 
it finds a match in its database, it ap- 
plies the fix automatically, as it did here 
by flattening out the foundation of the 
building, removing the bloated look 
from the front of the palace, and re- 
moving the edge vignetting from all the 
corners. Ahhhhhh, that's starting to look 
a bit better. After it applied its profile 
correction, the foundation beneath the 
building still didn't look perfectly straight, 
but luckily you can tweak the amount 
of Distortion correction applied by the 
profile by using the Correction Amount 
sliders at the bottom (here, I had to drag 
the Distortion slider over to 113 to get 
the foundation perfectly straight). 



Step Eight: 

If you need more than a little tweak to 
the profile (which we definitely do — look 
at how the building and tower are leaning 
back, back in Step Seven), then you need 
to click on the Manual tab and basically 
do it yourself. {Note: The changes you 
make in the Manual tab are added on top 
of what you already did in the Profile tab.) 
In this case, we need to fix the vertical 
geometric distortion, so drag the Vertical 
slider to the left, and as you do, keep an 
eye on the tower on the left. Your goal is 
to make it straight, so simply drag to the 
left until it is (in this case, I dragged over 
to -43, as shown here). Now, pinching 
the perspective of the image like this will 
leave a dark gray gap at the bottom and 
sides of the image (as seen here), but 
we'll deal with that in just a moment. For 
now, at least we've fixed the "leaning 
tower of Agra" problem. 

(Continued) 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



Chapter 3 



069 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Nine: 

Go ahead and click the Open Image 
button to open the corrected photo 
(complete with the dark gray gaps) in 
Photoshop. You'll notice that to fix the 
leaning problems, it had to kind of 
squash the image a bit, so now the build- 
ing looks a little squatty. To fix the squat- 
tiness (not a word, I know) and cover that 
dark gray gap at the bottom, get the 
Rectangular Marquee tool (M), and click- 
and-drag it around the image, going 
across the bottom edge, right above the 
dark gray gap. Now, press Command-T 
(PC: Ctrl-T) to bring up Free Transform. 
Grab the bottom-center transform han- 
dle and drag the image straight down — 
stretching it to fill the dark gray gap at 
the bottom (as shown here). Press Return 
(PC: Enter) to lock in your change, then 
press Command-D (PC: Ctrl-D) to de- 
select. The bonus here is that the build- 
ing doesn't look squatty anymore. Two 
birds. One stone. 



Step 10: 

Now, when it comes to those two 
gray triangles in the corners, you have 
two choices here: (1) The most common 
choice is simply to crop away those gray 
empty areas, so get the Crop tool (C), 
drag it out over as much of the photo as 
you can without extending into the gaps, 
and then press Return. (2) However, we 
could pull a fast one, and instead try a 
little Content-Aware Fill (it's definitely 
worth a try, because fairly often it works 
like magic). Get the Magic Wand tool 
(press Shift-W until you have it), and click 
it once in a gray area to select it, then 
Shift-click in the other one. Go under the 
Select menu, under Modify and choose 
Expand, and enter 4 pixels (Content- 
Aware Fill seems to work better if you 
expand out your selection by 4 pixels. 
I learned that from Adobe themselves). 




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Chapter 3 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



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Next, press the Delete (PC: Backspace) 

key to bring up the Content-Aware Fill 
dialog (that Delete key trick only works 
if your image is flattened. If this image 
was on a layer, you'd need to go under 
the Edit menu and choose Fill), and then 
choose Content-Aware from the Use 
pop-up menu. Click OK, and let's see 
how it worked (like how I create fake 
anticipation here, since you know and 
I know that it worked?). Hey, look at that — 
it worked. Well, it could probably use 
a tiny bit of cloning here and there, 
but all-in-all it did about 98% of the job. 
Nice! Press Command-D to deselect the 
triangular areas. 



Step 12: 

That tower isn't leaning anymore, but it 
is kind of skewed to the right a bit. We're 
going to pull another fast one and fix this 
while nobody's looking (nobody is looking, 
are they?). Get the Rectangular Marquee 
tool again, and click-and-drag out a rect- 
angular selection around the tower — just 
make sure you select some of the sky 
around it (that way, it can cover the old 
tower that's about to be behind it). Now 
press Command-J (PC: Ctrl-J) to put this 
selected area up on its own layer. Then, 
press Command-T to bring up Free Trans- 
form (as seen here). 



(Continued) 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics Chapter 3 071 i 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step 13: 

Press-and-hold the Command (PC: Ctrl) 
key, grab the top-right Free Transform 
handle, and drag upward to straighten 
out the tower (as shown here). Stretching 
out the tower like this might make it a 
little too tall, so once it's fairly straight, 
release the Command key, grab the top- 
center handle, and drag straight down 
a little to shrink the tower back down to 
size. By the way, while Free Transform is 
in place, you can go to the Layers panel 
and lower the Opacity of this top layer 
so you can see the original tower below 
it. That way, you can match up the height 
correctly. Just don't forget to raise your 
Opacity back up to 100% when you're 
done. Now, press the Return (PC: Enter) 
key to lock in your transformation. So, is 
all this "moving the tower thing" cheat- 
ing? You betcha! I love it!!!! (Just make 
sure you're not doing stuff like this if 
you're a photojournalist reporting the 
news. However, if you're like me, some- 
one trying to create beautiful images, 
then my friend, have at it!) 



Step 14: 

The final step would be to sharpen this 
puppy to death! (I mean, add a signifi- 
cant amount of sharpening.) Go under 
the Filter menu, under Sharpen, and 
choose Unsharp Mask. For Amount, 
enter between 90% and 100%, in- 
crease the Radius to 1.5 pixels, and set 
the Threshold at 3 levels. This is some 
major sharpening, but when you have 
a photo with something this detailed, it 
can take a lot of sharpening (mean- 
ing, it loves to be sharpened). Now, 
click OK to finish your lens correction 
problem (and then some!). A before 
and after is shown on the next page. 





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Chapter 3 



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"he Adobe Photoshoo CS( 



for Digital Photographers 




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Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics Chapter 3 073 i 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Fixing Chromatic 

Aberrations (That 

Colored-Edge Fringe) 



Chromatic aberration is a fancy name for that thin line of colored fringe 
that sometimes appears around the edges of objects in photos. Sometimes 
the fringe is red, sometimes green, sometimes purple, blue, etc., but all the 
time it's bad, so we might as well get rid of it. Luckily, Camera Raw has a 
built-in fix that does a pretty good job. 



Step One: 

Open a photo that has signs of chromatic 
aberrations. If they're going to appear, 
they're usually right along an edge in the 
image that has lots of contrast (like along 
the edges of these stone stairs). 



Step Two: 

Press Z to get the Zoom tool and zoom 
in on an area where you think (or see) the 
fringe might be fairly obvious (here, I've 
zoomed in on the steps on the top left, 
and you can see thin purple and green 
lines at the top and bottom of the steps). 
To remove this, start by clicking on the 
Lens Corrections icon (the sixth icon 
from the left) at the top of the Panel 
area, then click on the Color tab (in 
the center) to make the Chromatic 
Aberration controls visible. 




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Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



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Step Three: 

In most cases, all you'll have to do is turn 
on the Remove Chromatic Aberration 
checkbox (as shown here) and you're 
done — Photoshop removes the color 
fringe based on your lens' make and 
model, which it learns from the meta- 
data embedded into the image at the 
moment you took the shot. However, if 
for some reason the image still needs 
more correction (the checkbox alone 
didn't do the trick), then you can try get- 
ting rid of the fringe manually using the 
sliders in the Defringe section below the 
checkbox (just so you can see how this 
works, go ahead and turn off the Remove 
Chromatic Aberration checkbox). 



Step Four: 

We'll start by trying to remove the purple 
(or often magenta) line by dragging the 
Purple Amount slider to the right until you 
see it's gone. In this case, it removed most 
of it, but left a little bit (especially on the 
left). That's because the hue in the aber- 
ration is a little different (it happens), and 
that's when you use the Purple Hue slider 
to dial in just the right color. Click right 
between the two knobs and drag the 
slider way over to the right, and the re- 
sidual color is now gone (sometimes you 
might have to drag to the left — it just de- 
pends on the image. So, try dragging it in 
both directions first to quickly see which 
direction is the right one). You can do the 
same thing for the green aberration — 
drag the Green Amount slider to the 
right first, and if anything is left over, drag 
the Green Hue slider to dial in just the 
right hue, until it's completely gone (like 
you see here). Again, I rarely have to go 
beyond turning on the Remove Chromatic 
Aberration checkbox, but at least now if it 
doesn't do the job for you, you'll know 
what to do instead. 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



Chapter 3 



075 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Edge Vignetting: 

How to Fix It 

and How to 

Add It for Effect 



If you're looking at a photo and the corners of the photo appear darker, that's 
lens vignetting. Generally, I look at it this way: If it's just the corners, and they're 
just a little bit dark, that's a problem and I fix it. However, sometimes I want to 
focus the viewer's attention on a particular area, so I create a vignette, but 
I expand it significantly beyond the corners, so it looks like an intentional 
soft spotlight effect. Here's how to fix (or create) vignettes: 



Step One: 

Here, you can see the dark areas in 
the corners (that's the bad vignetting). 
This is normally caused by the camera's 
lens, so don't blame yourself (unless you 
bought a really cheap lens — then feel 
free to give yourself as much grief as you 
can bear). To remove this vignetting from 
the corners, start by clicking on the Lens 
Corrections icon (the sixth icon from 
the left) at the top of the Panel area. 
In the Profile tab, turn on the Enable 
Lens Profile Corrections checkbox and 
Photoshop tries to remove the edge 
vignetting based on your lens' make 
and model (it learns this from your im- 
age's EXIF data. See page 66 for more 
on this). If the image still needs cor- 
recting, try the Vignetting slider under 
Correction Amount. 



Step Two: 

If the automatic way just isn't working, 
do it manually by clicking on the Manual 
tab. In the Lens Vignetting section, click 
on the Amount slider and drag it to the 
right until the vignetting in the corners 
disappears. Once you move the Amount 
slider, the Midpoint slider beneath it be- 
comes available. It determines how wide 
the vignetting repair extends into your 
photo, so drag it to the left to expand 
the lightening farther toward the center 
of your photo. 




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Chapter 3 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 





Step Three: 

Now for the opposite: adding vignetting 
to focus attention (by the way, in the 
"Special Effects for Photographers" chap- 
ter, I also show you how to get the same 
effect outside of Camera Raw). For this, 
we'll switch to a different photo. 



Step Four: 

This time, in the Lens Vignetting sec- 
tion, you're going to drag the Amount 
slider to the left, and as you drag left, 
you'll start to see vignetting appear in the 
corners of your photo. But since it's just 
in the corners, it looks like the bad kind 
of vignetting, not the good kind, so you'll 
need to make the vignetting look more 
like a soft spotlight falling on your sub- 
ject. Drag the Midpoint slider quite a bit 
to the left, which increases the size of 
the vignetting and creates a soft, pleas- 
ing effect that is very popular in portrai- 
ture, or anywhere you want to draw atten- 
tion to your subject. That's it — how to get 
rid of 'em and how to add 'em. Two for 
the price of one! 



(Continued) 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics Chapter 3 077 i 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

So far, adding the vignette has been 
pretty easy — you just drag a couple of 
sliders, right? But where you'll run into 
a problem is when you crop a photo, 
because you're also cropping the vi- 
gnetting effect away, as well (after all, 
it's an edge effect, and now the edges 
are in a different place, and Camera 
Raw doesn't automatically redraw your 
vignette at the newly cropped size). 
So, start by applying a regular edge 
vignette (as shown here). 



Step Six: 

Now, let's get the Crop tool (C) from 
the toolbar, crop that photo in pretty 
tight, and you can see what the problem 
is — the vignette effect we just added is 
pretty much gone (the dark edges were 
cropped away). 

Note: Adobe originally added the ability 
to add a vignette after you've cropped an 
image (called Post Crop Vignetting) back 
in Photoshop CS4, but the problem was 
when you added it, it didn't look nearly as 
good as the regular non-cropped vignett- 
ing (even though it offered more control, 
as seen at the bottom of the Effects panel 
shown in Step Seven). It kind of looked 
just like adding muddy dark gray to the 
edges. Yeech! 




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Step Seven: 

Let's go add a post-crop vignette by 
clicking on the Effects icon (the fourth 
icon from the right) at the top of the 
Panel area and, under Post Crop Vi- 
gnetting, dragging the Amount slider to 
the left to darken the edges, then using 
the Midpoint slider to choose how far 
into your image this vignetting will ex- 
tend (as seen here). Now, here's what they 
added in CS5 (it makes all the difference 
in the world): At the top of the Post Crop 
Vignetting section is a pop-up menu 
with three different types of vignetting: 
Highlight Priority (which I think far and 
away looks the best, and the most like 
the original vignetting we applied back 
in Step Five), which tries to maintain the 
highlight details as the edges are dark- 
ened; Color Priority tries to maintain the 
color while the edges are darkened (it's 
okay, but not great); and Paint Overlay 
is the old method from CS4 that almost 
everybody hated (apparently somebody 
liked it, because it's still there). I would 
stay away from this one altogether. 



Step Eight: 

Below the Midpoint slider is the Round- 
ness slider that gives you control over the 
roundness of the vignetting (lower the 
Feather amount to 0, so you can get a 
better idea of what the Roundness slider 
does). The farther to the right you drag, 
the rounder the shape gets, and when 
you drag to the left, it actually becomes 
more like a large, rounded-corner rect- 
angle. The Feather slider determines 
how soft that oval you created with the 
Roundness slider becomes. I like it really 
soft, so it looks more like a spotlight, so 
I usually drag this slider quite a bit over 
to the right (here I dragged it over to 
73, but I wouldn't hesitate to go higher, 
depending on how it looks on the photo). 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



Chapter 3 



079 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



The Advantages of 

Adobe's DNG Format 

for RAW Photos 



Adobe created DNG (an open archival format for RAW photos) because, at this 
point in time, each camera manufacturer has its own proprietary RAW file format. 
If, one day, one or more manufacturers abandon their proprietary format for some- 
thing new (like Kodak did with their Photo CD format), will we still be able to open 
our RAW photos? With DNG, it's not proprietary — Adobe made it an open archival 
format, ensuring that your negatives can be opened in the future, but besides that, 
DNG brings another couple of advantages, as well. 



Step One: 

There are three advantages to converting 
your RAW files to Adobe DNG: (1) DNG 
files are generally about 20% smaller. 
(2) DNG files don't need an XMP sidecar 
file to store Camera Raw edits, metadata, 
and keywords — the info's embedded into 
the DNG file, so you only have one file to 
keep track of. And, (3) DNG is an open 
format, so you'll be able to open them 
in the future (as I mentioned in the intro 
above). If you have a RAW image open 
in Camera Raw, you can save it as an 
Adobe DNG by clicking the Save Image 
button (as shown here) to bring up the 
Save Options dialog (seen in the next 
step). Note: There's really no advantage 
to saving TIFF or JPEG files as DNGs, 
so I only convert RAW photos. 



Step Two: 

When the Save Options dialog appears, 
at the bottom of the dialog, from the 
Format pop-up menu, choose Digital 
Negative (shown here). Once you 
choose Digital Negative, a new set of 
options appears at the bottom of the 
dialog (seen in Step Three). 





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Step Three: 

New in CS6 is the Embed Fast Load Data 
checkbox, which uses a smaller embed- 
ded RAW preview that makes switching 
between images faster (I turn this feature 
on). Below that is a somewhat contro- 
versial option, but if used in the right 
way, I think it's okay. It uses a JPEG-like 
lossy compression (meaning there is a 
loss in quality), but the trade-off (just like 
in JPEG) is that your file sizes are dramati- 
cally smaller (about 25% of the size of a 
full, uncompressed RAW file). So, if there's 
a loss of quality, why would you use this? 
Well, I wouldn't use it for my Picks (the 
best images from a shoot — ones I might 
print, or a client might see), but what 
about the hundreds the client rejected 
or you don't like? Those might (it's your 
call) be candidates to be compressed to 
save drive space. It's something to con- 
sider. If you do want to do it, turn on that 
checkbox, then choose (from its pop-up 
menu) which option is most important to 
you: saving the same physical dimensions 
(pixel size) or file size (megapixels). Once 
you've made your choices, click OK, and 
you've got a DNG. 

TIP: Setting Your DNG Preferences 

With Camera Raw open, press Com- 
mand-K (PC: Ctrl-K) to bring up Camera 
Raw's Preferences dialog. There are two 
preferences in the DNG File Handling 
section: Choose Ignore Sidecar ".xmp" 
Files only if you use a different RAW pro- 
cessing application (other than Camera 
Raw or Lightroom), and you want Camera 
Raw to ignore any XMP files created by 
that application. If you turn on the Update 
Embedded JPEG Previews checkbox (and 
choose your preferred preview size from 
the pop-up menu), then any changes you 
make to the DNG will be applied to the 
preview, as well. 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



Chapter 3 



081 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Adjusting or 

Changing Ranges 

of Color 



In the next chapter, you're going to learn how to paint an adjustment over 
any part of your image, but sometimes you need to affect an entire area 
(like you need the entire sky bluer, or the sand warmer, or a piece of clothing 
to be an entirely different color). In those cases, where you're adjusting large 
areas, it's usually quicker to use the HSL adjustments, which not only let you 
change color, but also let you change the saturation and the lightness of the 
color. It's more powerful, and handier than you might think. 



Step One: 

Here's the original image of the washed- 
out top of a tugboat's mast against a 
bland blue sky. What I'd like to do is tweak 
the color of that sky so it's a richer blue, 
and then make the red crow's nest on 
the boat more vivid so it really stands out. 
You tweak individual colors, or ranges of 
color, in the HSL/Grayscale panel, so click 
on its icon at the top of the Panel area 
(it's the fourth one from the left — circled 
here in red). Now, click on the Saturation 
tab (as shown here) to bring up the Sat- 
uration sliders (which control the intensity 
of the colors). 



Step Two: 

We'll start by bringing some richness 
and depth back into that bland blue sky. 
You can just drag the Blues slider to the 
right, and it will get bluer (the color 
will get more intense), but most of the 
time, the color your eye sees (blue, in 
this case) is made up of more than just 
that color. So, rather than guessing, 
and messing with the individual sliders, 
I recommend grabbing the Targeted 
Adjustment tool (or TAT, for short) from 
the toolbar up top (it's the fifth tool from 
the left), then clicking it somewhere in the 
sky, and dragging straight upward. As you 
do this, it knows which sliders control 
that area, and it moves them for you (in 
this case, it moved the Blues slider a lot, 
but it also moved the Purples slider a 
little, too). 




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Step Three: 

By the way, dragging upward with the 
TAT increases the saturation amounts, 
and dragging downward decreases 
them. Just so you know. Okay, now that 
the sky looks pretty decent, let's work 
on that red crow's nest (or mini-light- 
house). So, take the TAT, click it on the 
side of it (I clicked between the walk- 
way and the horn), and drag straight 
upward to increase the color saturation 
(intensity) of those reds. Go look at the 
sliders, and you'll see it moved the Reds 
and Oranges sliders (so that color was 
made up of red and orange), but be- 
yond that, the TAT knows the right 
percentage of each, which is why using 
it gives you such an advantage (in fact, 
I don't use these HSL sliders without 
using the TAT). 



Step Four: 

If you think the red color looks too bright 
now, then all you have to do is click on 
the Luminance tab (it controls how bright 
the colors appear), click on a bright area 
of red, and drag downward (as shown 
here, where I clicked below the walk- 
way), and now the red tower isn't nearly 
as bright (compare it with what you see 
in Step Three). It kind of helps make the 
harsh light not as harsh, in this case. So, 
that's how it works for tweaking Saturation 
and Luminance. However, if you want 
to actually change a color (and not just 
tweak the existing color), then click on the 
Hue tab. The controls are the same: click 
your TAT on the tower and drag upward 
to change the color (as I did here in the 
inset). Again, you could always drag the 
sliders around, and eventually you'd find 
out which slider controls which part of the 
image, but I think you can see why Adobe 
invented the TAT — to make our lives in 
this panel easier. 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



Chapter 3 



083 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Removing 
Spots, Specks, 
Blemishes, Etc. 



If you need to remove something pretty minor from your photo, like a spot 
from some dust on your camera's sensor, or a blemish on your subject's face, 
or something relatively simple like that, you can use the Spot Removal tool right 
within Camera Raw. If it's more complicated than just a simple spot or two, you'll 
have to head over to Photoshop and use its much more powerful and precise re- 
touching tools (like the Healing Brush tool, Patch tool, and Clone Stamp tool). 



Step One: 

This photo has some simple problems 
that can be fixed using Camera Raw's 
Spot Removal tool. You start by clicking 
on the Spot Removal tool (the seventh 
tool from the right in the toolbar) or by 
pressing B to get it, and a set of options 
appears in the Spot Removal panel on 
the right (seen here). Using the tool is 
pretty simple — just move your cursor over 
the center of a spot that needs to be re- 
moved (in this case, it's those spots in the 
sky where my camera's sensor got dirty), 
then click, hold, and drag outward, and 
a red-and-white circle will appear, grow- 
ing larger as you drag outward. Keep 
dragging until that circle is a little larger 
than the spot you're trying to remove 
(as shown here below). Don't forget, you 
can use the Zoom tool (Z) to zoom in 
and get a better look at your spots 
before you drag out your circle. 




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► 084 



Chapter 3 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 




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Step Two: 

When you release the mouse button, 
a second circle (this one is green and 
white) appears to show you the area 
where Camera Raw chose to sample 
your repair texture from (it's usually 
very close by), and your spot or blemish 
is gone (as seen here). 

TIP: When to Fix Blemishes in 
Camera Raw 

So, what determines if you can fix a 

blemish here in Camera Raw? Basically, 

it's how close the blemish, spot, or 

other object you need to remove is to 

the edge of anything. This tool doesn't 

like edges (the edge of a door, a wall, 

a person's face, etc.), so as long as 

the blemish (spot, etc.) is all by itself, 

you're usually okay. 



Step Three: 

To remove a different spot (like the one 
near the top of the building here), you 
use the same method: move over that 
spot, click, hold, and drag out a circle 
that's slightly larger than the spot, then 
release the mouse button. In this case, 
Camera Raw did sample a nearby area, 
but unfortunately it also sampled a bit 
of the building, and it copied it to the sky 
area where we were retouching, making 
the retouch look very obvious with that 
piece of building hanging out there. 



(Continued) 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics Chapter 3 085 i 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Four: 

If this happens, here's what to do: move 
your cursor inside the green-and-white 
circle, and drag that circle to a different 
nearby area (here, I dragged it to a clean 
area to the left of the spot I'm removing), 
and when you release the mouse but- 
ton, it resamples texture from that area. 
Another thing you can try, if the area is 
at all near an edge, is to go to the top 
of the Spot Removal panel and choose 
Clone rather than Heal from the Type 
pop-up menu (although I use Heal about 
99% of the time, because it generally 
works much better). 



Step Five: 

When you're done retouching, just 
change tools and your retouches are 
applied (and the circles go away). Here's 
the final retouch after removing all the 
spots in the sky from my dirty sensor. 
Use this tool the next time you have 
a spot on your lens or on your sensor 
(where the same spot is in the same 
place in all the photos from your shoot) — 
fix the spot on one photo, then open 
multiple photos, and paste the repair 
onto the other selected RAW photos 
using Synchronize (see "Editing Multiple 
Photos at Once," earlier in this chapter, 
and just turn on the Spot Removal check- 
box in the Synchronize dialog). 





► 086 



Chapter 3 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



Some cameras seem to have their own "color signature," and by that I mean that 

every photo seems to be a little too red, or every photo is a little too green, etc. 

You just know, when you open a photo from that camera, that you're going 

to have to deal with the slight color cast it adds. Well, if that's the case, you 

can compensate for that in Camera Raw, and then set that color adjustment 

as the default for that particular camera. That way, any time you open a 

photo from that camera, it will automatically compensate for that color. 



Calibrating for Your 
Particular Camera 



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Step One: 

To calibrate Camera Raw so it fixes a 
persistent color cast added by your cam- 
era, open a typical photo taken with that 
camera in Camera Raw, and then click on 
the Camera Calibration icon (it looks like 
a camera and is the third icon from the 
right at the top of the Panel area). So, let's 
say that the shadow areas in every photo 
from your camera appear slightly too red. 
In the Camera Calibration panel, drag 
the Red Primary Saturation slider to the 
left, lowering the amount of red in the en- 
tire photo. If the red simply isn't the right 
shade of red (maybe it's too hot and you 
just want to tone it down a bit), drag the 
Red Primary Hue slider until the red color 
looks better to you (dragging to the right 
makes the reds more orange). 



Step Two: 

To have Camera Raw automatically 
apply this calibration each time a photo 
from that particular camera is opened 
in Camera Raw, go to Camera Raw's fly- 
out menu (in the top right of the panel), 
and choose Save New Camera Raw 
Defaults (as shown here). Now, when 
you open a photo from that camera 
(Camera Raw reads the EXIF data so 
it knows which camera each shot comes 
from), it will apply that calibration. Note: 
You can adjust your blues and greens in 
the same way. 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



Chapter 3 



087 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Reducing Noise in 
Noisy Photos 



This is, hands down, not only one of the most-requested features by photographers, 
but one of the best since the upgrade in CS5. Now, if you're thinking, "But Scott, 
didn't Photoshop and Camera Raw both have built-in noise reduction before CS5?" 
Yes, yes they did. And did it stink? Yes, yes it did. But, does the current noise reduction 
rock? Oh yeah! What makes it so amazing is that it removes the noise without greatly 
reducing the sharpness, detail, and color saturation. Plus, it applies the noise re- 
duction to the RAW image itself (unlike most noise plug-ins). 



Step One: 

Open your noisy image in Camera Raw 
(the Noise Reduction feature works best 
on RAW images, but you can also use it 
on JPEGs and TIFFs, as well). The image 
shown here was shot at a high ISO using 
a Nikon D3S, which didn't do a very good 
job in this low-light situation, so you can 
see a lot of color noise (those red, green, 
and blue spots) and luminance noise (the 
grainy looking gray spots). 



Step Two: 

Sometimes it's hard to see the noise 
until you really zoom in tight, so zoom 
into at least 100% (here, I zoomed into 
200%), and there it is, lurking in the 
shadows (that's where noise hangs out 
the most). Click on the Detail icon (it's 
the third icon from the left at the top 
of the Panel area) to access the Noise 
Reduction controls. I usually get rid of 
the color noise first, because that makes 
it easier to see the luminance noise (which 
comes next). Here's a good rule of thumb 
to go by when removing color noise: start 
with the Color slider over at (as shown 
here) and then slowly drag it to the right 
until the moment the color noise is gone. 
Note: A bit of color noise reduction is 
automatically applied to RAW images — 
the Color slider is set to 25. But, for JPEGs 
or TIFFs, the Color slider is set to 0. 





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Step Three: 

So, click-and-drag the Color slider to the 
right, but remember, you'll still see some 
noise (that's the luminance noise, which 
we'll deal with next), so what you're look- 
ing for here is just for the red, green, and 
blue color spots to go away. Chances 
are that you won't have to drag very far 
at all — just until that color noise all turns 
gray. If you have to push the Color slider 
pretty far to the right, you might start to 
lose some detail, and in that case, you 
can drag the Color Detail slider to the 
right a bit, though honestly, I rarely have 
to do this for color noise. 



Step Four: 

Now that the color noise is gone, all 
that's left is the luminance noise, and 
you'll want to use a similar process: just 
drag the Luminance slider to the right, 
and keep dragging until the visible noise 
disappears (as seen here). You'll gener- 
ally have to drag this one farther to the 
right than you did with the Color slider, 
but that's normal. There are two things 
that tend to happen when you have to 
push this slider really far to the right: you 
lose sharpness (detail) and contrast. Just 
increase the Luminance Detail slider if 
things start to get too soft (but I tend not 
to drag this one too far), and if things start 
looking flat, add the missing contrast back 
in using the Luminance Contrast slider 
(I don't mind cranking this one up a bit, 
except when I'm working on a portrait, 
because the flesh tones start to look icky). 
You probably won't have to touch either 
one all that often, but it's nice to know 
they're there if you need them. 



(Continued) 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics Chapter 3 089 i 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

Rather than increasing the Luminance 
Detail a bunch, I generally bump up the 
Sharpening Amount at the top of the 
Detail panel (as shown here), which re- 
ally helps to bring some of the original 
sharpness and detail back. Here's the 
final image, zoomed back out, and you 
can see the noise has been pretty much 
eliminated, but even with the default 
settings (if you're fixing a RAW image), 
you're usually able to keep a lot of the 
original sharpness and detail. A zoomed- 
in before/after of the noise reduction we 
applied here is shown below. 



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► 090 Chapter 3 Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



Since you're processing your own images, it only makes sense that you 

get to choose what resolution, what size, which color space, and how 

many bits per channel your photo will be, right? These are workflow 

decisions, which is why you make them in the Workflow Options 

dialog. Here are my recommendations on what to choose, and why: 



Setting Your 
Resolution, Image 
Size, Color Space, 
and Bit Depth 



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Step One: 

Once you've made all your edits, and 
the photo is generally looking the way 
you want it to, it's time to choose your 
resolution, size, etc. Directly below the 
Camera Raw Preview area (where you 
see your photo), you'll see your current 
workflow settings — they are underlined 
in blue like a website link. Click on that 
link to bring up the Workflow Options 
dialog (which is seen in the next step). 



Step Two: 

We'll start at the top by choosing your 
photo's color space. By default, it shows 
the color space specified in your digital 
camera, but you can ignore that and 
choose the color space you want the 
photo processed with. I recommend 
choosing the same color space that you 
have chosen as Photoshop's color space. 
For photographers shooting in RAW 
or using Lightroom, I recommend that 
you choose ProPhoto RGB, but if you're 
shooting in JPEG or TIFF format, then 
I still recommend that you choose Adobe 
RGB (1998) for Photoshop's color space, 
and then you would choose the same 
color space here, from the Space pop-up 
menu. See my color management and 
printing chapter (Chapter 11) for more 
on why you should use ProPhoto RGB 
or Adobe RGB (1998). 

(Continued) 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



Chapter 3 



091 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Three: 

When it comes to choosing your photo's 
bit depth, I have a simple rule I go by: 
I always work in 8 Bits/Channel (Photo- 
shop's default), unless I have a photo that 
is so messed up that after Camera Raw, 
I know I'm still going to have to do some 
major Curves adjustments in Photoshop 
just to make it look right. The advantage 
of 16-bit is those major Curves adjust- 
ments (you'd get less banding or poster- 
ization because of the greater depth 
of 16-bit). The reasons I don't use 16-bit 
more often are: (1) many of Photoshop's 
tools and features aren't available in 
16-bit, (2) your file size is approximately 
double, which makes Photoshop run a 
lot slower, and (3) 16-bit photos take up 
twice as much room on your computer. 
Still, some photographers insist on only 
working in 16-bit and that doesn't bother 
me one bit. (Get it? One bit? Aw, come 
on, that wasn't that bad.) 



Step Four: 

The next option down is Size. By default, 
the size displayed in the Size pop-up 
menu is the original size dictated by your 
digital camera's megapixel capacity 
(in this case, it's 4256 by 2832 pixels — 
the size generated by a 12.1-megapixel 
camera). If you click-and-hold on the Size 
pop-up menu, you'll see a list of image 
sizes Camera Raw can generate from your 
RAW original (the number in parentheses 
shows the equivalent megapixels that size 
represents). The sizes with a + (plus sign) 
by them indicate that you're scaling the 
image up in size from the original. The 
- (minus sign) means you're shrinking the 
size from the original, which quality-wise 
isn't a problem. Usually, it's fairly safe to 
increase the size to the next largest choice, 
but anything above that and you risk hav- 
ing the photo look soft and/or pixelated. 



Workflow Options 



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!_! Open in Photoshop as Smart Objects 



► 092 



Chapter 3 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



Workflow Options 



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Step Five: 

The last Workflow Options choice is what 
you want the resolution of your processed 
file to be. The topic of resolution is some- 
thing entire training DVDs are dedicated 
to, so we won't go in-depth about it here, 
but I'll give you some quick guidelines. 
If your photo will wind up on a printing 
press, use 300 ppi (you don't really need 
that much, but many print shops still think 
you do, so just play it safe at 300 ppi). 
When printing to an inkjet printer at larger 
than 8x10" size, I use 240 ppi (although 
some argue that the sweet spot for Epson 
printers is 360 ppi, so you might try print- 
ing the same image at both resolutions 
and compare). For prints smaller than 
8x10" (which are viewed at a very close 
distance), try 300 ppi. If your photos are 
only going to be viewed on the web, you 
can use 72 ppi. (By the way, the proper 
resolution is debated daily in Photoshop 
discussion forums around the world, and 
everybody has their own reason why their 
number is right. So, if ever you're bored 
one night....) 



Step Six: 

When you click OK and then click Open 
Image in the Camera Raw dialog, your 
photo is processed using those settings 
and opened in Photoshop (here's the 
processed photo in Photoshop with the 
Image Size dialog open, so you can see 
the settings). These workflow settings now 
become your defaults, so you don't have 
to mess with them again, unless: (a) you 
want to choose a different size, (b) you 
need to work in 16-bit, or (c) you need to 
change the resolution. Personally, I work 
at the original size taken by my camera, in 
8-bit mode, and at a resolution of 240 ppi, 
so I don't have to change these workflow 
options very often. 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



Chapter 3 



093 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Getting the Old 

CS5-Style Fill Light 

Slider Back 



As much as I love the new improved Shadows slider in Camera Raw — it does a 
better-quality job of opening up shadows — it's not as powerful (meaning, the old 
Fill Light slider would let you go a little "over-the-top"). I particularly liked the Fill 
Light slider's look for certain things like opening up shadow areas in hair, or creating 
faux-HDR effects. Here's a little workaround I came up with that lets you blend the 
new sliders with the old Fill Light slider, thanks to a little smart object trick. 



Step One: 

Start by opening your image in Camera 
Raw and doing your standard edits (in 
this case, I tweaked the white balance a 
little by dragging the Temperature slider 
a little bit to the right to make it warmer. 
I also increased the Exposure a little — 
to +0.25 — to make it a bit brighter, and 
I opened up the Shadows a little bit, too, 
by dragging it over to +13, as seen here). 
Nothing drastic, but I did do a few little 
tweaks here. Now, press-and-hold the 
Shift key and you'll see that the Open 
Image button changes to the Open 
Object button (it's shown circled here in 
red). Go ahead and click it to open this 
image in Photoshop as a smart object. 



Step Two: 

Once the image appears in Photoshop 
as a smart object (you can tell it's a smart 
object by looking in the Layers panel — 
in the bottom-right corner of the layer's 
thumbnail, you should see a little page 
icon), go ahead and Right-click just to 
the right of the layer's name and, when 
the pop-up menu appears, choose New 
Smart Object Via Copy (as shown here). 
This makes a duplicate of your smart ob- 
ject layer, but it is no longer tied to the 
original layer, so we can edit these as 
two totally independent RAW images. 








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► 094 



Chapter 3 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 




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Step Three: 

Double-click on the thumbnail for this 
duplicated smart object layer, and it 
reopens in Camera Raw. Now, click on 
the Camera Calibration icon (it's the 
third one from the right and looks like 
a camera) at the top of the Panel area 
and, at the top of that panel, click on 
the Process menu and choose 2010 
(as shown here at the bottom). This 
changes just this duplicate layer back 
to the old process version, so it has 
the controls from Photoshop CS5. Now, 
go to the Basic panel and, lo and be- 
hold, there is the old Fill Light slider. 
Go ahead and crank that Fill Light slider 
up (here, I dragged it over to 69). This 
really opens up the shadows in her 
hair (much more so than the Shadows 
slider set to +100 in the current pro- 
cess version). However, you can see the 
weird look it gives the rest of the image, 
which is why Adobe thought this con- 
trol needed some improvements. When 
it looks good to you, click OK. 



Step Four: 

With the top layer active in the Layers 
panel, Option-click (PC: Alt-click) on the 
Add Layer Mask icon at the bottom of the 
panel to hide this newly processed layer 
behind a black mask. Now, get the Brush 
tool (B), make sure your Foreground color 
is set to white, then paint over the areas 
you want to have the old Fill Light look (for 
example, here I painted over her hair and 
earrings, which is primarily what I wanted). 
Here's the final image, using a combina- 
tion of the old Camera Raw Fill Light slider 
and the new, improved Camera Raw 
processing power. Sweet! 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



Chapter 3 



095 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Photoshop Killer Tips 



Don't Use the Reduce Noise 
Filter in Photoshop 




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There are two different places you can 
reduce noise in Photoshop: The Noise 
Reduction controls in Camera Raw rock, 
however the Reduce Noise filter in Photo- 
shop (under the Filter menu, under Noise) 
does not. We used to joke that the slid- 
ers weren't connected to anything, and 
if they were, it was a blur filter. My advice — 
only use the Noise Reduction in the Detail 
panel of Camera Raw, and avoid the 
other altogether. 

Rotating Your Images 

Finally, a shortcut that makes perfect 
sense: To rotate your image to the left, 
press L; to rotate to the right, press R. 
The nice thing is, once you learn one, 
you'll never forget the other. 

Making Camera Raw Full Screen 

To have Camera Raw expand to fill your en- 
tire screen, click the Full Screen mode icon 
to the right of the Preview checkbox, at the 
top of the window or just press the F key. 




Avoiding Noise Problems 

If there's noise in your photo, chances are 
it's in the shadow areas, so keep this in 
mind when you're editing your images. 
If you open up the shadows a lot (using 
the Shadows slider, Blacks, or in some 
cases, even the Exposure slider), any noise 
that was already in the image is going to 
become magnified. If you can't avoid 
opening up those shadows, just make 
sure you use Camera Raw's Noise Reduc- 
tion to reduce the visible amount. 



Noise Reduction 
Luminance 




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Tip for Wacom Tablet Users Who 
Use Their Tablet in Their Lap 

Back in CS4, Adobe introduced Fluid 

Canvas Rotation, which lets tablet users 

who work with their tablet in their lap 

rotate the screen to match the current 

angle of their tablet (you turn this on 




by clicking on the Hand tool, choosing 
the Rotate View tool, and then clicking- 
and-dragging that within your image to 
rotate the canvas). There was only one 
problem, though: when you rotated 
the canvas, it rotated your brushes, too 
(which wouldn't happen in real life). 
Luckily, now when your canvas rotates, 
your brushes stay intact. 

Get Automatic Auto Corrections 

The Auto correction one-click fix feature 
got dramatically better in previous ver- 
sions of Photoshop. So, now it's to the 
point where the Auto button is pretty 
decent. Not great, not amazing, but de- 
cent. Anyway, if you want to have Camera 
Raw automatically apply an Auto correc- 
tion to every photo you open (to get a 
better starting point for your editing), 
then click on the Preferences icon in 
Camera Raw's toolbar (it's the third icon 
from the right), and in the Default Image 
Settings section, turn on the Apply Auto 
Tone Adjustments checkbox. Now, every 
image will get an automatic correction as 
soon as it's opened. 

Default Image Settings 



^Apply auto tone adjustments 

3 Apply auto grayscale mix when converting to grayscale 

!_' Make defaults specific to camera serial number 
LJ Make defaults specific to camera ISO setting 



► 096 



Chapter 3 



Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



Photoshop Killer Tips 



Assigning a Color Profile to 
Your RAW Image 






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If you shoot in RAW, your camera doesn't 
embed a color profile in the image (like 
it does with JPEG and TIFF images). You 
assign a color profile in Camera Raw, and 
if you're using Camera Raw for all your 
editing, and then you're just saving your 
file as a JPEG for emailing or posting to 
the web, you're going to want to assign 
a color profile that keeps the colors look- 
ing like you saw in Photoshop. You do 
this by clicking on the blue link beneath 
the Preview area in Camera Raw. This 
brings up the Workflow Options dialog, 
where you choose which color profile 
gets embedded into your image (you 
choose it from the Space pop-up menu). 
If you're emailing the image, or posting 
it on the web, choose sRGB as your color 
space — that way it pretty much maintains 
the colors that you saw while you were 
in Camera Raw (if you left it at ProPhoto 
RGB, or even Adobe RGB [1998], the 
colors on the web, or in the email, will 
probably look drab and washed out). 

Get a Histogram for the Most 
Important Part of Your Photo 

If you're editing a portrait in Camera Raw, 
the most important part is, of course, your 
subject, but the histogram in Camera Raw 
shows you a readout for the entire image 
(so if you shot your subject on a white 
background, the histogram isn't going to 
be much help in determining if the skin 




R: — 
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B: — 



f/9 1/125 5 
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tone is correct). To get around this, grab 
the Crop tool (C), and drag out a cropping 
border tight right around your subject's 
face (but don't actually crop the image). 
With the cropping border in place, if you 
look at the histogram (in the top right of 
the window), it shows you a readout for 
just what's inside the cropping border — 
your subject's face. Very handy! 

The Hidden Trash Can 



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If you're wondering why you've never 
seen the Trash icon in Camera Raw 
(where you can click to delete files), 
it's because it only appears when you 
have multiple images open there (it ap- 
pears at the end of the toolbar). Click on 
it, and it marks your selected image(s) for 
deletion. Click the Done button, and it 
deletes that image (well, it moves it to the 
Trash on a Mac, or Recycle Bin on a PC). 

Finding Your Best Images Fast 

I mentioned in the last chapter that if you 
have multiple images open in Camera Raw, 
you can assign star ratings and labels to 
photos just as if you were in Mini Bridge 
(you even use the same shortcuts). But, a 
little-known tip is that if you press-and- 
hold the Option (PC: Alt) key, the Select 



All button at the top of the filmstrip on the 
left changes into the Select Rated button. 
Click it, and any images that have either 
a star rating or a label will be instantly 
selected for you, letting you get to your 
best images fast. 




Raylin-476.nef 

Mr 



Right-Click to Choose Your Zoom 

If you Right-click directly on your 
image in Camera Raw's Preview area, 
a pop-up menu with different zoom 
percentages appears. 




Camera Raw — Beyond the Basics 



Chapter 3 



097 < 




Photo by Scott Kelby Exposure: 1/125 sec 



Aperture Value: //8 



Chapter 4 Camera Raw's Adjustment Tools 




Attitude Adjustment 

camera raw's adjustment tools 



When I went searching for songs with the word "adjustment" 
in them, I quickly found Aerosmith's "Attitude Adjustment," 
which would make this an easy choice for me as an Aero- 
smith fan, but there's no real way for you to know if the title 
I'm referencing up there is actually the one by Aerosmith, or 
if I secretly went with another song with the exact same title 
by hip hop artists Trick Trick and Jazze Pha. In iTunes, this 
song was marked with the Explicit label, so I thought I'd 
better listen to the free 90-second preview first, because 
I wanted to make sure I didn't pick a song whose free pre- 
view was too explicit, but while listening to that preview, 
something very unexpected happened to me that I haven't 
gotten over to this very day. The sad truth is that I couldn't 
understand a word they were saying. I even played it back 
a couple of times, and I was waiting for naughty words 
to jump out at me, but I could barely make out anything 



they said. It just sounded like a bunch of noise. This can 
only mean one thing — I'm old. I remember playing songs 
for my parents when I was younger, and I remember my 
mom saying, "I can't understand a word they're saying" 
and she had that irritated look that only old people who 
can't understand a word they're hearing can get. But this 
time it was me. Me — that young, cool guy (stop giggling) 
experiencing my first "old people" moment. I was sad. 
I just sat there for a moment in stunned silence, and then 
I said "F&*$ S#!& A@# M*%$#%" and in no time flat, 
my wife stuck her head in the room and said, "Are you 
writing rap lyrics again?" At that moment, I felt young 
again. I jumped up out of my chair, but then I grabbed 
my back and yelled "F*%$#% R% A $!" My wife then 
said, "I can't understand a word you're saying." 
Peace out! 



099 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Dodging, Burning, 

and Adjusting 

Individual Areas 

of Your Photo 



One of my favorite features in Camera Raw is the ability to make non-destructive 
adjustments to individual areas of your photos (Adobe calls this "localized corrections") 
The way they've added this feature is pretty darn clever, and while it's different than 
using a brush in Photoshop, there are some aspects of it that I bet you'll like better. 
We'll start with dodging and burning, but we'll add more options in as we go. 



Step One: 

This photo has two areas that need 
completely different adjustments: 
(1) the sky needs to be darker with more 
vibrant colors, and (2) the plane needs 
to be brighter and punchier. So, get 
the Adjustment Brush from up in the 
toolbar (it's shown circled here in red) or 
just press the letter K on your keyboard. 
However, I recommend that you do all the 
regular edits to your photo in the Basic 
panel first (exposure, contrast, etc.), just 
like normal, before you grab the brush. 



Step Two: 

Once you click on the brush, an Adjust- 
ment Brush panel appears on the right 
side of the window, with most of the same 
sliders you have in the Basic panel (except 
for Vibrance), along with some extra ones 
(like Sharpness, Noise Reduction, and 
Moire Reduction). Let's start by darkening 
the sky. With the Adjustment Brush, you 
(1) choose what kind of adjustment you 
want first, then (2) you start painting, and 
then (3) you tweak the amount of your ad- 
justment after the fact. So, start by clicking 
on the - (minus sign) button to the left of 
the Exposure slider, which resets all the 
sliders to and lowers the Exposure (the 
midtones control) to -0.50, which is a 
decent starting place. 






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► 100 



Chapter 4 



Camera Raw's Adjustment Tools 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



: 





Step Three: 

At the bottom of the Adjustment Brush 
panel, there is a really amazing Adjust- 
ment Brush feature called "Auto Mask," 
which helps to keep you from acciden- 
tally painting on things you don't want to 
paint on (so it's great around the edges 
of things). But, when you're painting over 
something like a big sky, it actually slows 
things down because it keeps trying to 
find an edge. So, I leave the Auto Mask 
checkbox turned off for stuff like this, and 
here, I'll just avoid getting close to the 
edges of the plane (for now, anyway). Go 
ahead and paint over the sky (with Auto 
Mask turned off), but of course, avoid get- 
ting too close to the propeller blades or 
the wings of the plane — just stick to open 
areas of sky (as seen here). Notice how 
the sky gets darker as you paint? 



Step Four: 

Once you've painted in most of the 
sky (but avoided the prop and wings 
of the plane), now you can tweak how 
dark it is. Try lowering the Exposure to 
-1.00 (as shown here) and the area you 
painted over gets a lot darker. This is 
what I meant by "you tweak it after the 
fact." Also, you see that green pin on 
the right side of the image? That rep- 
resents this one adjustment (you can 
have more than one, which is why you 
need a way to keep track of them. 
More on this coming up). 

TIP: Deleting Adjustments 

If you want to delete any adjustment 
you've made, click on the adjustment's 
pin to select that adjustment (the cen- 
ter of the pin turns black), then press 
the Delete (PC: Backspace) key on 
your keyboard. 

(Continued) 



Camera Raw's Adjustment Tools 



Chapter 4 



101 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

Okay, now that "glow" around the prop 
and wings where we haven't painted 
is starting to get on my nerves, so let's 
deal with that before we tweak our set- 
tings any more. When we're getting near 
the edges of the prop and wings is when 
you want to turn Auto Mask back on 
(shown here). That way, you can paint 
right up against them, filling in all those 
areas, without accidentally painting over 
the blades and wings. The key to using 
Auto Mask is simple — don't let that little 
+ (plus sign) inside the inner circle of 
your brush stray over onto the blades or 
wings, because that's what determines 
what gets affected (if that + crosses over 
onto a wing, it starts painting over the 
wing). It's okay if the outer circle crosses 
right over the wings and blades — just 
not that + (see how the brush here is 
extending over onto the cone in front 
of the prop, but it's not getting darker? 
That's Auto Mask at work). 



Step Six: 

So, how do you know if you've really 
painted over the entire area you wanted 
to adjust? How do you know whether 
you've missed a spot? Well, if you turn 
on the Show Mask checkbox near the bot- 
tom of the panel, it puts a tint over the 
area you painted (as seen here, where 
I changed my tint color to red by clicking 
on the color swatch to the right of the 
checkbox), so you can see if you missed 
anything. If you don't want this on all the 
time, you can just hover your cursor over 
any pin (which is what I'm doing here) and 
it will temporarily show the masked area 
for that pin. Now that you know where 
you painted, you can go back and paint 
over any areas you missed. If you want to 
keep the mask turned on while you paint, 
just press the letter Y on your keyboard. 




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► 102 



Chapter 4 



Camera Raw's Adjustment Tools 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



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Step Seven: 

Now, let's unlock a little more of the 
Adjustment Brush's power by adjusting 
more sliders. That's right, once you've 
painted over (masked) an area, you can 
adjust any of the other sliders and they 
affect just the area you painted over 
(here, they'll just affect the sky). Starting 
at the top, let's drag the Tint slider to 
the right, toward magenta, to make the 
sky color more interesting (I dragged 
it over to +30), then let's make it even 
darker by lowering the Exposure amount 
to -1.15. Now, head down to Saturation 
and crank that up a bit (I took it up to 
+60), and that flat dawn sky gets much 
more vibrant (as seen here). Yeah, that's 
just like I remember it (wink). The ability 
to paint over one area, and stack up a 
number of adjustments on just that area, 
is what gives this tool so much power. 



Step Eight: 

Next, let's work on the plane (a P-51 
Mustang). First, click the New radio 
button at the top of the panel, so we 
can paint over a new area (otherwise, 
the plane would get the same settings 
we used on the sky). Then, click the + 
button to the right of Exposure twice 
to reset all the other sliders to and 
bump up the Exposure amount to 
+1.00 (twice the one-click amount). 
Now, with Auto Mask turned on, paint 
over the underside of the plane and 
the propeller blades (as shown here), 
which lightens those areas because 
you increased the Exposure amount by 
quite a bit. Also, notice there are now 
two pins, and the sky's pin is now white, 
letting you know it's no longer active. 
If you wanted to adjust the sky again, 
you'd click on its pin, and all the sky 
settings would come back. 

(Continued) 



Camera Raw's Adjustment Tools 



Chapter 4 



103 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Nine: 

Finish painting over the rest of the plane 
(wings, propeller blades), and then let's 
add some more "juice" to it by increasing 
the Exposure amount a bit more (here, 
I dragged it over to +1.50), then open the 
shadow areas by dragging the Shadows 
slider a little to the right (here, I went to 
+10), and then let's add some punch by 
adding Clarity (drag it over to around +17). 
Now the plane is really starting to pop, 
but you can see that I let the little + in 
the middle of the brush extend off the 
bottom of the wings a bit, and it started 
to brighten the tarmac (concrete runway) 
below them, which looks bad. So, we'll 
have to deal with that next. 

TIP: Choosing What to Edit 

If you have multiple pins and you drag a 
slider, Camera Raw will adjust whichever 
pin is currently active (the green-and- 
black one). To choose which adjustment 
you want to edit, click on the pin to se- 
lect it, then make your changes. 



Step 10: 

If you make a mistake, or need to erase 
something that spilled over, just press- 
and-hold the Option (PC: Alt) key and 

the brush switches to Erase mode. Now, 
just paint the area where you spilled over 
and it erases the spillover (as shown here). 
You can also switch to Erase mode by 
clicking on the Erase radio button at the 
top of the Adjustment Brush panel. When 
you switch this way, you get to choose 
the Size, Feather, Flow, and Density of 
the Erase brush (more on this in just a 
moment), so it's at least good to click on 
the radio button, choose your preferred 
brush size (I set the Feather and Density 
to 100% for this brush), then from that 
point on, just press-and-hold the Option 
key to get it when you need it. 



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► 104 



Chapter 4 



Camera Raw's Adjustment Tools 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 





After 



Step 11: 

Here are a couple of other things about 
the Adjustment Brush you'll want to know: 
The Feather slider controls how soft the 
brush edges are — the higher the number, 
the softer the brush (I paint with a soft 
brush about 90% of the time). For a hard- 
edged brush, set the Feather slider to 0. 
The default brush settings are designed 
to have it build up as you paint, so if 
you paint over an area and it's not dark 
enough, paint another stroke over it. This 
build-up amount is controlled by the Flow 
and Density sliders at the bottom of the 
panel. The Density slider kind of simulates 
the way Photoshop's airbrush capabilities 
work with its Brush tools, but the effect is 
so subtle here that I don't ever change it 
from its default setting of 100. The Flow 
slider controls the amount of paint that 
comes out of the brush (I leave the Flow 
set at 100 most of the time these days, 
but if I decide I want to "build up," then 
I lower it to 50). Below is a before/after, 
which shows how useful dodging and 
burning with the Adjustment Brush 
can be. 

Note: I felt I needed to make one more 
change to this image. If you look back 
at Step 10, the yellow nose cone looks 
too bright, so I used the Erase brush to 
erase over it entirely. Then, I clicked the 
New button, reset everything to 0, in- 
creased the Exposure amount to +70, 
and painted over just the cone (as shown 
in Step 11) to get the final image here. 



Camera Raw's Adjustment Tools 



Chapter 4 



105 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Retouching 

Portraits in 

Camera Raw 



One of the main things we've always had to go to Photoshop for was retouching 
portraits, but now, by using the Spot Removal tool, along with the Adjustment 
Brush, we can do a lot of simple retouching jobs right here in Camera Raw, 
where they're completely non-destructive and surprisingly flexible. 



Step One: 

In the portrait shown here (which I shot 
on stage during my Light It, Shoot It, 
Retouch It class at the Photoshop World 
Conference & Expo), we want to make 
three retouches: (1) we want to remove 
any blemishes and soften her skin, (2) we 
want to lighten the whites of her eyes, 
brighten her eyes in general, and add 
contrast, and (3) we want to sharpen her 
eyes, eyebrows, and eyelashes. 



Step Two: 

We'll start with removing blemishes. First, 
zoom in on her face, then get the Spot 
Removal tool (B) from the toolbar up top 
(it's shown circled here in red) and set your 
brush Radius (a fancy name for the brush's 
size) to where it's just slightly larger than 
the blemish you want to remove. Now, 
move your cursor over the blemish and 
just click. Don't paint a stroke or any- 
thing — just click once and it's gone. If 
the removal doesn't look quite right, it 
just means that Camera Raw chose a bad 
place to sample clean skin from to make 
its repair. So, click on the green sample 
circle and drag it to a nearby area and it 
redoes the retouch (as shown here). Now, 
remove the rest of the blemishes with just 
a single click each, adjusting the position 
of their green sample circles, if necessary. 





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► 106 



Chapter 4 



Camera Raw's Adjustment Tools 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 




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Step Three: 

Next, let's do some skin softening. Click 
on the Adjustment Brush (shown circled 
here) in the toolbar, then click the - (minus 
sign) button to the left of Clarity four times 
to set the Clarity amount at -100 (this is 
called "negative clarity" by people who 
love to give everything a name). Now, in- 
crease the Sharpness slider to +25 and 
you're ready to go. Increase the size of 
your brush (by using either the Size slider 
or the Right Bracket key on your key- 
board), and then paint over her skin to 
soften it (as shown here), but be careful 
to avoid any areas that should stay sharp 
and retain lots of detail, like her eyebrows, 
eyelids, lips, nostrils, hair, etc. While you're 
painting, you might not feel like it's really 
doing that much, but toggle on/off the 
Preview checkbox at the top, and you'll 
see that it's doing a lot more than you 
might think. Of course, once you're done 
painting, if you think you've applied too 
much softening, just raise the Clarity (try 
-75 or -50). 



Step Four: 

Let's work on the eyes next. Click the 
New radio button at the top of the 
panel (to work on a new area), then 
reset the Clarity and Sharpness sliders 
to by double-clicking directly on the 
slider knobs. Now, drag the Exposure 
slider a little to the right, decrease the 
size of your brush, then paint over the 
whites of her eyes (as shown here). 
Once that looks good, click the New 
radio button again and zero out the 
sliders, so we can work on adding 
contrast and brightness to her irises. 

(Continued) 



Camera Raw's Adjustment Tools 



Chapter 4 



107 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

To add more contrast, we're really going 
to crank up the Contrast slider (here, I 
dragged it over to +73), but to brighten 
and enhance the texture of the irises a bit 
at the same time, increase the Exposure 
to +15 and the Clarity to +18, then paint 
directly over the irises, and see how much 
better they look! Lastly, let's sharpen the 
eyes, eyelashes, and eyebrows. Click the 
New button once again, reset all the 
sliders to (just click the + [plus sign] 
button to the right of Sharpness and it re- 
sets them all and moves Sharpness up 
to +25). Now, paint over her pupils and 
irises (but not out all the way to the edge 
of the iris), then paint over her eyelashes 
and eyebrows to help make them look 
sharper and crisper, completing the re- 
touch (a before/after is shown below). 






Before 



After 



► 108 



Chapter 4 



Camera Raw's Adjustment Tools 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



The Graduated Filter (which acts more like a tool) lets you recreate the look of a 
traditional neutral density gradient filter (these are glass or plastic filters that are dark 
on the top and then graduate down to fully transparent). They're popular with land- 
scape photographers because you're either going to get a photo with a perfectly 
exposed foreground, or a perfectly exposed sky, but not both. However, with the 
way Adobe implemented this feature, you can use it for much more than just neutral 
density gradient effects (although that probably will still be its number one use). 



Fixing Skies (and 
Other Stuff) with 
the Graduated Filter 



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Step One: 

Start by selecting the Graduated Filter 
tool (G) up in the toolbar (it's shown 
circled in red here). When you click on it, 
its options panel appears (shown here) 
with a set of effects you can apply that are 
similar to the ones you can apply using 
the Adjustment Brush. Here we're going 
to replicate the look of a traditional neu- 
tral density gradient filter and darken the 
sky. Start by dragging the Exposure slider 
to the left, or just click on the - (minus 
sign) button two times to get to -1.00 
(as seen here). 



Step Two: 

Press-and-hold the Shift key (to keep 
your gradient straight), click at the top 
center of your image, and drag straight 
down until you reach the top of the grass 
(as shown here). Generally, you want to 
stop dragging the gradient before it 
reaches the horizon line, or it will start to 
darken your properly exposed foreground. 
You can see the darkening effect it has on 
the sky and the photo already looks more 
balanced. Note: Just let go of the Shift 
key to drag the gradient in any direction. 

(Continued) 



Camera Raw's Adjustment Tools 



Chapter 4 



109 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Three: 

The green pin shows the top of your 
gradient; the red pin shows the bot- 
tom. In this case, we'd like the sky a 
little darker still, so drag the Exposure 
slider to the left a bit to darken the 
midtones in the sky. What's nice about 
this tool is, like the Adjustment Brush, 
once we've dragged out the Graduated 
Filter, we can add other effects to that 
same area. So, if you'd like the sky to be 
bluer, you can click on the Color swatch, 
and when the Color Picker appears, click 
on a blue color to complete your effect. 

TIP: Gradient Tips 

You can reposition your gradient after 
the fact — just click-and-drag downward 
on the line connecting the green and red 
pins to move the whole gradient down. 
Click-and-drag either pin to rotate your 
gradient after it's in place. You can also 
have more than one gradient (click on the 
New radio button at the top of the panel) 
and to delete a gradient, just click on it 
and press the Delete (PC: Backspace) key. 





Before 



After 



► 110 



Chapter 4 



Camera Raw's Adjustment Tools 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



There are some really nice special effects you can apply from right within 

Camera Raw itself, and some of these are easier to achieve here than they are 

by going into the rest of Photoshop and doing it all with layers and masks. Here 

are two special effects that are popular in portrait and wedding photography: 

(1) drawing attention by turning everything black and white, but leaving one 

key object in full color (very popular for wedding photography and photos 

of kids), and (2) creating a soft, dramatic spotlight effect by "painting with light." 



Special Effects 
Using Camera Raw 




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Step One: 

For the first effect (where we make one 
part of the image stand out by leaving 
it in color, while the rest of the image is 
black and white [I know it's cheesy, you 
know it's cheesy, but clients love it]), we 
want to set up the Adjustment Brush so 
it paints in black and white. Start by get- 
ting the Adjustment Brush (K), then in 
the Adjustment Brush options panel, click 
on the - (minus sign) button to the left of 
Saturation four times to reset all the other 
sliders to and set the Saturation to -100. 
That way, whatever you paint over be- 
comes black and white. 



Step Two: 

In just a moment, we're going to paint 
over most of the image, and this will go 
a lot faster if you turn off the Auto Mask 
checkbox near the bottom of the panel 
(so it's not trying to detect edges as you 
paint). Once that's off, make your brush 
nice and big (drag the Size slider to the 
right or press the Right Bracket key), 
and paint over most of the image, but 
make sure you don't get too close to the 
area right around the bouquet, as shown 
here, where I left about a Vi" area un- 
touched all around the bouquet. 

(Continued) 



Camera Raw's Adjustment Tools 



Chapter 4 



111 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Three: 

Now you'll need to do two things: 

(1) make your brush size smaller, and 

(2) turn on the Auto Mask checkbox. The 
Auto Mask feature is really what makes 
this all work, because it will automatically 
make sure you don't accidentally make 
the object in your image that you want 
to remain color, black and white, as long 
as you follow one simple rule: don't let 
that little plus-sign crosshair in the center 
of the brush touch the thing you want to 
stay in color (in our case, it's the bouquet 
of flowers). Everything that little crosshair 
touches turns black and white (because 
we lowered the Saturation to -100), so 
your job is to paint close to the flowers, 
but don't let that crosshair actually touch 
the flowers. It doesn't matter if the edges 
of the brush (the round rings) extend over 
onto the flowers (in fact, they'll have to, 
to get in really close), but just don't let 
that little crosshair touch, and you'll be 
fine. This works amazingly well (you just 
have to try it for yourself and you'll see). 



Step Four: 

Here, we've painted right up close to 
the bouquet and yet the flowers and 
even the green leaves are still in color 
because we were careful not to let that 
crosshair stray over onto them. Okay, 
now let's use a similar technique in a dif- 
ferent way to create a dark, dramatic 
effect using the same image. Start by 
pressing the Delete (PC: Backspace) key 
to get rid of this adjustment pin and 
start over from scratch with the original 
color image. 



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► 112 



Chapter 4 



Camera Raw's Adjustment Tools 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



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Step Five: 

Here's the original full-color image again. 
Get the Adjustment Brush and click the 
- (minus sign) button beside Exposure 
to zero everything out. Then drag the 
Exposure slider almost all the way over 
to the left. You can also drag the Shad- 
ows slider way over to the left, too (to 
make sure that, when we paint, things 
get really dark). 



Step Six: 

Turn off the Auto Mask checkbox and, 
using a large brush, paint over the entire 
image (as shown here) to greatly darken it. 



(Continued) 



Camera Raw's Adjustment Tools Chapter 4 1 1 3 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Seven: 

Now, click the Erase radio button at the 
top of the Adjustment Brush's options 
panel (or just press-and-hold the Option 
[PC: Alt] key to temporarily switch to the 
Erase tool), set your brush to a very large 
brush size (like the one shown here), set 
your Feather (softness) amount to around 
90, then click once right over the area 
you want lit with a soft spotlight (like I did 
here, where I clicked on the bride's face). 
What you're doing is essentially revealing 
the original image in just that one spot, 
by erasing the darkening you added in 
the previous step. 



Step Eight: 

Click just a few more times on the 
image, maybe moving V2" or so around 
her head and shoulders, to reveal just 
the areas where you want light to appear, 
and you'll wind up with the image you 
see here as the final effect. If the effect 
seems too intense, undo those last few 
steps by pressing Command-Option-Z 
(PC: Ctrl-Alt-Z) a few times, then lower 
the Flow amount. That way, it builds up 
more gradually as you click the brush. 








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► 114 



Chapter 4 



Camera Raw's Adjustment Tools 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



This is the first version of Camera Raw that lets us paint with white balance, and of 
all the new things added to Camera Raw, believe it or not, this is one you'll probably 
wind up using the most. It's pretty common to have a natural light photo where part 
of the photo is in shadows, which usually means the parts in daylight have one color, 
and the parts in shadows are usually bluish (especially if you use Auto White Balance, 
which most of us do, because it works pretty well for most situations). Here's how to 
paint with white balance to make all the color in your image consistent: 



Fixing Color Problems 
(or Adding Effects) 
by "Painting" 
White Balance 




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Step One: 

Here's a location portrait, where our 
subject has a nice warm skin tone (par- 
tially because I put an orange gel over 
the off-camera flash), but take a look at 
the background behind her — the street 
and buildings are in the shade and that 
makes them look blue (like it was taken at 
dawn), even though it was taken at sunset. 
If I try to warm up the white balance, she 
is going to turn really yellow. Luckily, now 
we can adjust the white balance in just 
one area. 



Step Two: 

Get the Adjustment Brush (K), click on 
the + (plus sign) button to the right of 
Temperature (this resets all the other 
sliders to and sets the Temperature to 
+25), and start painting over these bluish 
background areas (as shown here). Once 
you've painted over them, you can ad- 
just the Temperature slider (drag to the 
right to warm up the color and make this 
area less blue, as I did here, or to the left 
if the default setting of +25 makes things 
too warm). This is the beauty of using 
the Adjustment Brush for this — once 
you paint over the bluish area, you can 
"dial in" just the right amount of white 
balance correction by dragging the slider 
after you've painted. Now the street looks 
more neutral, and I also painted over the 
sky a bit to make it even more "sunsetty" 
(I know — that's not really a word). I also 
decreased the Highlights a bit to finish 
it up. 



Camera Raw's Adjustment Tools 



Chapter 4 



115< 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Reducing Noise 

in Just the 

Shadow Areas 



If you shoot at a high ISO (like 800 or above), you're going to see some noise in 
your image (depending on your camera's make and model, of course), but the 
area where it's going to show up the most is in the shadow areas (that's where 
noise tends to be its worst, by far). Worse yet, if you have to brighten the shadow 
areas, then you're really going to see the noise big time. Well, as good as Camera 
Raw's noise reduction works, like any noise reduction, the trade-off is it makes your 
photo a bit softer (it kind of blurs the noise away). This technique lets you paint 
noise reduction just where you need it, so the rest of the image stays sharp. 



Step One: 

We'll start by brightening up the wall 
at the end of this hallway. This shot was 
taken at ISO 800, so when we brighten 
up that area, it's going to exaggerate any 
noise in those shadow areas big time, but 
at least now we can do something about 
it. Start by getting the Adjustment Brush 
(K), click on the + (plus sign) button to the 
right of Shadows (this resets all the other 
sliders to 0), then drag the Shadows slider 
to around +88, and paint over that green- 
ish wall in the back. Even after that, it's still 
too dark, so try brightening the Highlights 
by dragging that slider over to +75 and 
increase the Exposure to +0.45. Lastly, drag 
the Clarity slider over to +42 (to enhance 
the texture). It definitely looks better now 
(well, to me anyway), but if you look at the 
inset, you now see lots of noise that was 
once hidden in those shadows. 



Step Two: 

Now, zoom in to 100%, so you can really 
see the noise in these shadow areas (and 
drag the Noise Reduction slider to the 
right as you keep an eye on the amount of 
noise in your image. Keep dragging until 
you find that sweet spot, where the noise 
has been reduced but these shadow areas 
haven't gotten too blurry (remember, it's 
noise reduction, not noise removal). This 
noise reduction only affects that wall area 
where you painted, and the rest of the 
image keeps its original sharpness. 




v CWII j (_DWM_J 



► 116 



Chapter 4 



Camera Raw's Adjustment Tools 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



Let's say you feel like a particular part of your photo needs more 

Clarity, so you've set the Clarity slider to 100 and painted over that part 

of your image. You look at that area and think, "Even though I painted 

with the slider at 100%, I still need more!" (Basically, you need your amp 

to go to 11. :) Here's what to do (it's a trick I picked up from my buddy, 

Matt Kloskowski, which he calls "double stacking" and it really works great!): 



How to Get More 
Than 1 00% Out of 
Any Adjustment 
Brush Effect 



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Step One: 

Here's the image we want to work on, 
and our goal is to bring out extra detail 
in the headlamps of the car. So, go ahead 
and get the Adjustment Brush (K), click 
on the + (plus sign) button to the right 
of the Clarity slider (to reset all the other 
sliders to 0), and then drag just that Clar- 
ity slider way over to +1 00. Next, fully paint 
over just the two circular headlamps. Now, 
if you think they still need more detail 
to really make them "pop," but you've 
already painted with your Clarity maxed 
out at +100, what do you do? You can't 
drag the slider over to +200 or anything 
like that, right? Well, not without a work- 
around anyway. 



Step Two: 

Click the New radio button at top of the 
Adjustment Brush panel, and you'll notice 
that your Clarity is still set to +100. Now, 
all you have to do is paint over that same 
area again — just start your brush stroke 
in a different place along the headlamps 
and now you're stacking a second pass 
of Clarity on that same area (so you have 
two pins on this area now: the original pin 
where you applied 100% Clarity, and now 
a second pin with another 100% Clarity 
on top of that). Basically, you've got 200% 
Clarity applied on those headlamps. Of 
course, this doesn't just work for Clarity — 
it works for any of the sliders here in the 
Adjustment Brush panel. 



Camera Raw's Adjustment Tools 



Chapter 4 



117< 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Photoshop Killer Tips 



Painting a Gaussian Blur 

Okay, technically it's not a Gaussian blur, 
but in Camera Raw, you can paint with 
a blur effect by lowering the Sharpness 
amount (in the Adjustment Brush panel) 
below (actually, I'd go all the way to 



Clarity 



Sharpness. 



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Moire Reduction 



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-100 to get more of a Gaussian-type blur 
look). This is handy if you want to add 
a blur to a background for the look of 
a more shallow depth of field, or one 
of the 1 00 other reasons you'd want to 
blur something in your photo. 

Why There Are Two Cursors 

When you use the Adjustment Brush, 
you'll see there are two brush cursors 
displayed at the same time, one inside 
the other. The smaller one shows the 
size of the brush you've selected; the 
larger (dotted-line circle) shows the 
size of the feathering (softening) you've 
applied to the brush. 




How to Set the Color to None 



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Once you pick a color using the Adjust- 
ment Brush's Color Picker, it's not really 
obvious how to reset the color to None 
(no color). The trick is to click on the Color 
swatch (in the middle of the Adjustment 
Brush options panel) to reopen the Color 
Picker, then drag the Saturation slider 
down to 0. Now, you'll see the X over 
the Color swatch, letting you know it's 
set to None. 

How to See Just One of Your Layers 
Just Option-Click (PC: Alt-click) on the 

Eye icon beside the layer you want to see, 
and all the others are hidden from view. 
Even though all the other layers are hidden, 
you can scroll through them by pressing- 
and-holding the Option (PC: Alt) key, and 
then using the Left and Right Bracket 
keys to move up/down the stack of layers. 
Want to bring them all back? Just Option- 
click on that Eye icon again. 



Painting Straight Lines 

If you want to paint a straight line 
using the Adjustment Brush, you can 
use the same trick we use with Photo- 
shop's Brush tool: just click once where 
you want the line to start, press-and- 
hold the Shift key, then click once where 
you want the straight line to end, and 
the Adjustment Brush will draw a per- 
fectly straight line between the two. 
Really handy when working on hard 
edges, like the edge of a building 
where it meets the sky. 



EL- ■ J 



Save a "Jump Back" Spot 

If you're familiar with Photoshop's 
History panel, and how you can make 
a snapshot at any stage of your editing, 
so you can jump back to that look with 
just one click, well... good news: you can 
do that in Camera Raw, too! You can save 
a snapshot while you're in any panel by 
pressing Command-Shift-S (PC: Ctrl- 
Shift-S). Then you can jump back to 
how the image looked when you took 
that snapshot by clicking on it in the 
Snapshots panel. 

Snapshots =<• 



► 118 



Chapter 4 



Camera Raw's Adjustment Tools 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



Photoshop Killer Tips 



Starting Over from Scratch 

If you've added a bunch of adjustments 
using the Adjustment Brush, and you 
realize you just want to start over from 
scratch, you don't have to click on each 
one of the edit pins and hit the Delete 
(PC: Backspace) key. Instead, click on the 
Clear All button in the bottom-right corner 
of the Adjustment Brush options panel. 

A Clancy 



A Sharpness 

-■ _- 



Noise Reduction 



Moire Reduction 



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S Show Pins 



Changing Brush Size 
with Your Mouse 

If you Right-click-and-hold with the 

Adjustment Brush in Camera Raw, you'll 

see a little two-headed arrow appear 

in the middle of your brush. This lets 

you know you can drag side-to-side to 

change the size of your Adjustment Brush 

(drag left to make it smaller and right to 

make it bigger). 




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Normally, when you paint with the 
Adjustment Brush, you see the adjust- 
ment (so if you're darkening an area, as 
you paint, that area gets darker), but if 
you're doing a subtle adjustment, it might 
be kind of hard to see what you're actu- 
ally painting (and if you're spilling over 
into an area you don't want darkened). If 
that's the case, try this: turn on the Show 
Mask checkbox (near the bottom of the 
Adjustment Brush panel). Now, when you 
paint, it paints in white (the default mask 
color, which you can change by clicking 
on the color swatch to the right of the 
checkbox), so you can see exactly the area 
you're affecting. When you're done, just 
press the Y key to turn the Show Mask 
checkbox off. This one's worth a try. 



Add Your Own Color Swatches 

When you click on the Color swatch in 
the Adjustment Brush panel, you see 
that there are five color swatches in the 
bottom-right corner of the Color Picker. 
They're there for you to save your most- 
used colors, so they're one click away. 
To add a color to the swatches, first 
choose the color you want from the 
color gradient, then press-and-hold 
the Option (PC: Alt) key and when you 
move your cursor over any of those five 
color swatches, it will change into a paint 
bucket. Click that little bucket on any 
one of the swatches, and it changes the 
swatch to your currently selected color. 




Hiding the Edit Pins 

To temporarily hide the edit pins that ap- 
pear when you use the Adjustment Brush, 
just press the V key on your keyboard 
(it toggles the pins' visibility on/off). 




Camera Raw's Adjustment Tools 



Chapter 4 



119< 




Photo by Scott Kelby Exposure: 1/100 sec Focal Length: 200 mm Aperture Value: //2.8 



Chapter 5 How to Resize and Crop Photos 





Scream of the Crop 

how to resize and crop photos 



I love the title of this chapter — it's the name of an album 
from the band Soulfarm (tell me that Soulfarm wouldn't 
make a great name for a horror movie!). Anyway, I also 
found a band named Cash Crop, which would make a great 
title, too, but when I looked at their album, every song was 
marked with the Explicit warning. I listened to a 90-second 
preview of the first track (which was featured in the original 
motion picture soundtrack for the movie Sorority Row), and 
I immediately knew what kind of the music they did. Naughty, 
naughty music. Anyway, while I was listening, and wincing 
from time to time as F-bombs exploded all around me, 
I realized that someone at the iTunes Store must have the 
full-time job of listening to each song and choosing the 
90-second preview. I imagine, at this point, that person has 
to be 100% completely numb to hearing things like the 
F-bomb, the S-missile, and the B-grenade (which means 



they could totally do a stint as Joe Pesci's nanny). But, 
I digress. The "Scream of the Crop" title (which would make 
a great title for a movie about evil corn) is almost ideal 
for this chapter, except for the fact that this chapter also 
includes resizing. So, I thought, what the heck, and searched 
for "resize" and found a song called "Undo Resize" by 
electronic ambient artist DJ Yanatz Ft. The Designers, and 
it literally is an 8:31 long background music track with two 
European-sounding women whispering the names of menu 
commands from Adobe products. Stuff like "Select All," 
"Fill," "Distort," "Snap to Grid," and so on. I am not making 
this up (I listened to the free 90-second preview). It was 
only 99c, which was a bargain for 8+ minutes of menu 
commands set to music. Normally, this many minutes 
of menu commands set to music would be more like, 
I dunno, $1.29 or so. 



121 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Basic Cropping 
for Photos 



Adobe completely overhauled cropping in Photoshop CS6, and it's a big improve- 
ment (it was long overdue, since aside from a few minor enhancements, cropping 
has been essentially unchanged since Photoshop 1.0). Here, we'll cover the basic 
garden-variety cropping (and the new way of cropping in CS6), but since there are 
many different ways to crop a photo in Photoshop (and different reasons why you'd 
use one over another), we'll cover them all. If you're a Lightroom user, you'll be right 
at home with this new cropping, because it works more like Lightroom's cropping. 



Step One: 

Press the letter C to get the Crop tool 
and you instantly see the first improve- 
ment over previous versions of the tool: 
you don't have to drag the cropping 
border out over your photo — it's auto- 
matically added around your image for 
you (yay!). Now, just grab one of the cor- 
ner or side handles and start dragging 
inward to start cropping (as seen here) 
and it crops in toward the center of the 
image (the area to be cropped away will 
appear dimmed). If you want to keep the 
image proportions the same in your crop 
(I usually do), just press-and-hold the 
Shift key while you drag any of the crop- 
ping handles. Also, you can reposition 
your image within the border by clicking- 
and-dragging on it. 



Step Two: 

The Rule of Thirds overlay grid that you 
see in Step One doesn't appear over 
your photo until you actually drag one 
of the cropping handles. If you see a 
different overlay, just click on the View 
pop-up menu in the Options Bar and 
you'll see a list of the different overlays 
you can choose (if you're not sure which 
one you want, you can cycle through 
them by pressing the letter O). There are 
also three overlay options in the menu: 
Always Show Overlay (once you start 
cropping, it's visible even when you're 
not cropping), Never Show Overlay, and 
Auto Show Overlay (my favorite — it only 
appears when you're actually cropping). 




Grid 
Diagonal 
Triangle 
Golden Rat o 
Golden Spiral 

Auto Show Overlay 

/ Always Show Overlay 

Never Show Overlay 

Cyilte Overlay 

Cycle Overlay Orientation 



► 122 



Chapter 5 How to Resize and Crop Photos 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



: 





Step Three: 

While you have the cropping border in 
place, if you need to rotate your photo, 
just move your cursor anywhere outside 
the border. When you do this, the cur- 
sor will change into a double-headed 
arrow. Just click, hold, and drag up (or 
down) and the cropping border will 
rotate in the direction you choose. One 
big thing that has changed in how this 
works in Photoshop CS6 is that now the 
image actually rotates (rather than the 
border), which makes the process much 
easier (especially when you're trying to 
straighten a horizon line or a building). 
A little pop-up now appears, too, with 
the angle of rotation (it's shown circled 
here in red). 



Step Four: 

If you decide you want to return to the 
old way of rotating your crop (where the 
border rotates, rather than your image), 
click on the Set Additional Crop Options 
icon (it looks like a gear) in the Options 
Bar and turn on the Use Classic Mode 
checkbox (also known as "old school" 
or "ancient cropping" by today's hip- 
ster croppers), and then you're back to 
the old method. However, I really recom- 
mend giving this new way a try — it takes 
a little getting used to, but once you do, 
you'll really find it useful. While we're 
in this options menu, when you're not 
in Classic mode, you have two options 
available here: (1) to turn off having 
your crop centered automatically (it's 
on by default), and we'll talk about the 
next one on the next page (it's a little 
more involved). 

(Continued) 



How to Resize and Crop Photos 



Chapter 5 



123 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

That other option (2) is more powerful 
than it sounds, because it pretty much 
brings one of the most popular crop- 
ping features of Lightroom over here to 
Photoshop CS6. In Lightroom, it's called 
Lights Out cropping, and when you use 
this, it blacks out everything surrounding 
your crop area, so as you drag a crop- 
ping handle, you see exactly what the final 
image will look like without any distrac- 
tions. If you click on the Set Additional 
Crop Options icon, you can toggle this 
on/off with the Show Cropped Area check- 
box, but honestly it's quicker just to press 
the letter H on your keyboard (it's easy 
to remember — H for hide the distracting 
stuff; click on a cropping handle first or it'll 
switch to the Hand tool). Want to take it up 
a notch? Once you've hidden the extra 
stuff, hit the Tab key on your keyboard 
and everything else (the Toolbox, panels, 
Options Bar, etc.) hides temporarily, too. 
The other options here only kick in if you 
do have that dimmed cropped away area 
visible (called the Crop Shield), and you 
can make it lighter or darker by chang- 
ing the Opacity amount, or you can turn 
it off altogether by turning off the Enable 
Crop Shield checkbox. 



Step Six: 

If you want to save some time, there's 
a list of preset standard cropping sizes 
in the pop-up menu at the left end of 
the Options Bar (seen here). Just choose 
the crop ratio you'd like (here, I chose a 
square 1x1 ratio), and your crop border 
automatically resizes to that size or ratio 
(as shown here). 





► 124 



Chapter 5 How to Resize and Crop Photos 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



a 



a 



Adobe Photoshop 



Crop the image? 



(_ Don't Crop j (^ Cancel ^ ( Crop J 




Step Seven: 

If you decide at some point you don't 
want to crop the image at all, you can 
either press the Esc key on your key- 
board, click on the "No!" symbol in the 
Options Bar (as shown here), or just click 
on a different tool in the Toolbox, which 
will bring up a dialog asking if you want 
to crop the image or not. 

TIP: Flipping Your Crop 
Horizontal/Vertical 

Want to flip the cropping border after 
you've clicked on it, so you can crop your 
wide photos with a tall crop that maintains 
the same aspect ratio (or vice versa)? You 
can click the little circular arrow button 
in the middle of the Options Bar, but 
there's an even faster way — just press the 
letter X on your keyboard. 



Step Eight: 

So far, we've looked at the standard way 
of cropping in CS6 — click on the tool and 
then drag the handles where you want 
them — but you can also use the freestyle 
way of cropping (like in previous versions 
of Photoshop) by taking the Crop tool it- 
self and just clicking-and-dragging over 
the area you want to crop (as shown here). 
Don't let it freak you out that there's a 
cropping border already in place — just 
click-and-drag it out, and when you 
release the mouse button, it will display 
your new cropping border. Of course, 
now you can tweak the handles just like 
before. If you go back and look at the 
original image in Step One, you'll see how 
much we've already cropped away (it's 
quite a bit). 

(Continued) 



How to Resize and Crop Photos 



Chapter 5 



125 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Nine: 

This is something you could actually do 
in previous versions of Photoshop, but it's 
just easier and more intuitive in CS6, and 
that is to add canvas area around your 
image using the Crop tool. One quick 
thing to check first: if you want a white 
background for your canvas area (and my 
guess is, most times you will), then before 
you even click on the Crop tool, press 
the letter D on your keyboard to set your 
Background color to white. Then, once 
you click on the Crop tool, make sure 
Unconstrained is selected in the pop- 
up menu at the left end of the Options 
Bar, otherwise the cropping border will 
be constrained to the aspect ratio of your 
image (in this case, we want the bottom 
section to be deeper than the sides and 
top). Now, grab a cropping handle and 
drag the border outward to add canvas 
area. Here, I clicked on the top-left crop- 
ping handle and dragged up and to the 
left (at a 45° angle), and it expanded the 
top and left side areas around my image. 



Step 10: 

Here, I dragged the right side out and 
then dragged the bottom-center handle 
down quite a bit to add a fine art poster 
mat look around my image. 

TIP: Skip Holding the Shift Key 

You already know that to keep your crop- 
ping proportional, you press-and-hold 
the Shift key, right? Here's how to skip 
having to hold that key ever again, yet 
still keep it proportional: close any open 
images, grab the Crop tool, and then 
choose Original Ratio from the pop-up 
menu at the left end of the Options Bar. 
Now, it's your default setting. How cool 
is that? 



' untitled-33-Z,nef@ 25% (Crop Preview, RCE/&- I 





► 126 



Chapter 5 How to Resize and Crop Photos 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



: 




' nntlil«l-»-a.ntf £ 33-** Oarer Q, R6B/&') ■ 




Step 11: 

Before you actually commit to cropping 
your image, you have a decision to make. 
Luckily, it's probably a decision you'll 
make once, based on how you like to 
do things, so you won't have to make it 
every time. You get to decide if the part 
of your image that gets cropped away 
from view is: (a) gone forever, or (b) just 
hidden from view and, if necessary, can 
be brought back. You choose this by turn- 
ing on/off the Delete Cropped Pixels 
checkbox up in the Options Bar (shown 
circled here in red). With it turned on, 
when you crop, the stuff outside the 
border is cropped away (and you get a 
smaller file size). If you turn if off, it keeps 
those areas in the file, even though you 
can't see them (well, not until you click 
on the Crop tool again and click-and-drag 
the cropping border back out). If you 
need the photo a specific size, but aren't 
happy with the way your first crop looks, 
you can move the image around with the 
Move tool (V), or click on the cropping 
border while the Crop tool is active, then 
click on the image and move it. 



Step 12: 

Once you have the cropping border right 
where you want it, press the Return (PC: 
Enter) key to crop your image. The final 
cropped image is shown here, where we 
cropped off some of the crowd on the 
right side, and the lens peeking into the 
frame from above my shooting position 
(down on one knee), and some of the 
excess grass on the tee box. 



How to Resize and Crop Photos 



Chapter 5 



127 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Cropping to a 
Specific Size 



If you're using one of the standard size or cropping ratio presets that appear 
in the Crop tool's pop-up menu, then you're set. However, there are only a few 
common sizes in that pop-up menu, so you're going to need to know (a) how to 
create custom sizes, and (b) how to save that custom size to the pop-up menu, 
so you don't have to build it from scratch again next time. Plus, I'm going to show 
you another way to crop an image that, well, I'm not proud of, but I know a lot of 
photographers that do it this way. (Now, I'm not saying that I've done it that way, 
but... well... I've done it that way. More times than I care to admit.) 



Step One: 

Here's the image I want to print as a 
wide 20x16" print (a very common size 
today, even though it's based on the size 
of traditional film, not digital images, so 
you have to crop just to make it fit). Start 
by clicking on the Crop tool (C) in the 
Toolbox, then from the pop-up menu at 
the left end of the Options Bar, choose 
Size & Resolution (as shown here). 



Step Two: 

This brings up the Crop Image Size & 
Resolution dialog (shown here). Type in 
the custom size you want (in this case, 
20x16" at a resolution of 240 ppi, which 
is pretty ideal for most color inkjet print- 
ing). If you think you'll be using this size 
again (and chances are, you will), turn on 
the Save as Crop Preset checkbox (as 
shown here), and it adds this new size to 
that pop-up menu, so you don't have to 
recreate it every time. When you click OK, 
it resizes the cropping border so it's 20" 
wide by 16" deep. You can click-and-drag 
the border left/right to get the part of 
the photo you want to appear inside the 
cropping border. Now press the Return 
(PC: Enter) key and it crops your image 
to that size. 





I Inches 


■ \ 




1 Inches 


:i 




[ Pixels/Inch 


:' 



EjjSave as Crop Preset 






) 



► 128 



Chapter 5 How to Resize and Crop Photos 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



f\r>C\ 



Untitled-1 (g> 16.7% (RGB/ 8) 



Name: Untitled- 1 



C 



1 — Preset: ' Custom 

Size: 

Width: 

Height: 

Resolution: 








m 












; 1 












I 20 






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[ ! Inches 


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Color Mode: 


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Background Contents: 


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■ 












Color Profile: 
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1 Adobe RGB <1$9S) 


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[ Cancel 

(_ Save Preset... 



( Delete Preset... 



Image Size: 
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Untitled-1 @ 16.7% (Layer 1, RCB/SJ * 




Step Three: 

Okay, here's that (ahem) other method: 
Go under the File menu, under New, 
and choose Document. When the New 
dialog appears, enter 20 inches by 16 
inches, and enter 240 for Resolution, then 
click OK to create a new blank document 
in the exact size and resolution you need 
(as seen here). 

TIP: Cropping to Another 
Photo's Size 

If you already have a photo that is the 
exact size and resolution that you'd like 
to apply to other images, you can use 
its settings as the crop dimensions. First, 
open the photo you'd like to resize, and 
then open your ideal-size-and-resolution 
photo. Get the Crop tool, and then from 
the pop-up menu at the left end of the 
Options Bar, choose Size & Resolution. 
In the dialog that appears, choose Front 
Image from the Source pop-up menu, 
and click OK. Photoshop will automati- 
cally input that photo's dimensions into 
the Crop tool's Width and Height fields. 
All you have to do is crop the other image, 
and it will share the exact same specs as 
your ideal-size photo. 



Step Four: 

Now, get the Move tool (V), click on 
the image you want cropped to that 
size, and drag it onto that new blank 
document. While you still have the Move 
tool, click-and-drag the image around 
within the window so it's cropped the 
way you want it, then press Command-E 
(PC: Ctrl-E) to merge this layer with the 
Background layer, and you're set. As you 
can see, they both kind of do the exact 
same thing, so which one's right? The one 
you like best. 



How to Resize and Crop Photos 



Chapter 5 



129 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Creating Your 

Own Custom 

Crop Tools 



Although it's more of an advanced technique, creating your own custom tools 
isn't complicated. In fact, once you set them up, they will save you time and money. 
We're going to create what are called "tool presets." These tool presets are a series 
of tools (in this case, Crop tools) with all our option settings already in place so, we 
can create a 5x7", 6x4", or whatever size Crop tool we want. Then, when we want to 
crop to 5x7", all we have to do is grab the 5x7" Crop tool preset. Here's how: 



Step One: 

Press the letter C to switch to the Crop 
tool, and then go under the Window 
menu and choose Tool Presets to bring 
up the Tool Presets panel. You'll find that 
five Crop tool presets are already there. 
(Make sure that the Current Tool Only 
checkbox is turned on at the bottom of 
the panel, so you'll see only the Crop 
tool's presets, and not the presets for 
every tool.) 



Step Two: 

Go up to the Options Bar and enter the 
dimensions for the first tool you want to 
create (in this example, we'll create a Crop 
tool that crops to a wallet-size image). In 
the Width field, enter 2 in, then press the 
Tab key to jump to the Height field, enter 
2.5 in, and press Return (PC: Enter). Note: 
If you want to include the resolution in 
your tool preset, go to the pop-up menu 
at the left end of the Options Bar, and 
choose Size & Resolution. Enter your 
Height, Width, and Resolution in the 
dialog that appears, and click OK. 




Crop Image Size & Resolu 1 







m 








w 




Width: 


* 


1 1 i_ 


* 1 


1 Inches 


* ' 


Height: 


2.5 


1 Inches 


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Resolution: 


240 


[ Pixels/Inch 


*4 




LJ Save as Cr 


op Preset 



OK 
l ^ Cancel ) 



► 130 



Chapter 5 How to Resize and Crop Photos 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



: 




Preset Manager 



I — Preset Type: f Tools 



3 



#r Heating Brush 21 pixels 



1 Magnetic Lasso 24 pixels 



. Crop 10 in x fl in at 240 ppi 



. Crop 4 in x 6 in at 24D ppi 



< Crop £ in x 4 in at 24D ppi 



"EJ. Crop 4 inch x -E inch BOD ppi 



"t^ Crop 5 inch x 1 inch BOD ppi 



"tj. Crop 5 inch x 4 inch BOD ppi 



"EJ. Crop 5 inch x 7 inch BOD ppi 



L+ Crop S in x 10 in at 240 ppi 

-.'-■:■ '- 



L^ Crop to Wallet Size (Landscape) 



"t£ Crop to Wallet Size (Portrait* 



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Step Three: 

In the Tool Presets panel, click on the 
Create New Tool Preset icon at the bot- 
tom of the panel (to the left of the Trash 
icon). This brings up the New Tool Preset 
dialog, in which you can name your new 
preset. Name it, click OK, and the new 
tool is added to the Tool Presets panel. 
Continue this process of typing in new 
dimensions in the Crop tool's Options 
Bar and clicking on the Create New Tool 
Preset icon until you've created custom 
Crop tools for the sizes you use most. 
Make sure the name is descriptive (for 
example, add "Portrait" or "Landscape"). 
If you need to change the name of a 
preset, just double-click directly on its 
name in the panel, and then type in a 
new name. 



Step Four: 

Chances are your custom Crop tool 
presets won't be in the order you want 
them, so go under the Edit menu, under 
Preset, and choose Preset Manager. In 
the resulting dialog, choose Tools from 
the Preset Type pop-up menu, and scroll 
down until you see the Crop tools you 
created. Now just click-and-drag them 
to wherever you want them to appear 
in the list, and then click Done. 



Step Five: 

Now you can close the Tool Presets 
panel because there's an easier way to 
access your presets: With the Crop tool 
selected, just click on the Crop icon on 
the left end of the Options Bar. A tool 
preset picker will appear. Click on a pre- 
set, and your cropping border will be 
fixed to the exact dimensions you chose 
for that tool. 



How to Resize and Crop Photos 



Chapter 5 



131 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Custom Sizes for 
Photographers 



Photoshop's dialog for creating new documents has a pop-up menu with a list 
of preset sizes. You're probably thinking, "Hey, there's a 4x6", 5x7" and 8x10" — 
I'm set." The problem is there's no way to switch the resolution of these presets 
(so the Portrait, 4x6 will always be a 300 ppi document). That's why creating 
your own custom new document sizes is so important. Here's how: 



Step One: 

Go under the File menu and choose 
New. When the New dialog appears, 
click on the Preset pop-up menu to 
reveal the list of preset types, and 
choose Photo. Then click on the Size 
pop-up menu to see the preset sizes, 
which include 2x3" 4x6" 5x7" and 
8x10" in both portrait and landscape 
orientation. The only problem with 
these is that their resolution is set to 
300 ppi by default. So, if you want 
a different size preset at less than 
300 ppi, you'll need to create and 
save your own. 



Step Two: 

For example, let's say that you want a 5x7" 
set to landscape (that's 7" wide by 5" tall). 
First, choose Photo from the Preset pop- 
up menu, then choose Landscape, 5x7 
from the Size pop-up menu. Choose your 
desired Color Mode (below Resolution) 
and Color Profile (under Advanced), and 
then enter a Resolution (I entered 212 ppi, 
which is enough for me to have my image 
printed on a high-end printing press). 
Once your settings are in place, click 
on the Save Preset button. 



Name: 



Untitled-1 



OK 



Preset: ' Photo 



:' 




Background Contents: [ White 
[▼J Advanced — 



\B 



C 



Cancel 



D 



f Save Preset... ^ 
Delete Preset.., ; 



Image Size: 
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D 



Preset: ' Custom 



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Pixel Aspect Ratio: [ Square Pixels 



T> 



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(_ Cancel ) 



( ^Delete Presets 



Image Size: 
4.5DM 



► 132 



Chapter 5 How to Resize and Crop Photos 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



New Document Preset 



Preset Name: 7 in X 5 in at 212 ppi 



- Include in Saved Settings: — 
Resolution 3 Content 
3 Mode 3 Profile 

3 Bit Depth 3 Pixel Aspect Ratio 



(^ Cancel j 



CD 



Values not included in the saved preset will 
default to their last used value. 
Document profile will default to working space 
if not included in the saved preset 



Clipboard 

Default Photoshop Size 



Pre sen 









U.S. Paper 
International Paper 
Photo 






■) 






1 * \ 


Web 

Mobile & Devices 

Film & Video 








T I 




:h 


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Color Profile: ' Adobe RGB (1998) 



Ti 



Pixel Aspect Ratio: [ Square Pixels 



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Image Size: 

4.S0M 



C 
Backgrounc 

[*] Advar 



Adobe Photoshop 



Are you sure you want to delete 7 in X 5 
in at 212 ppi? This action cannot be 
undone. 



No 



r 



Color Profile: ' Adobe RGB (1998) 



3 



ige Size: 
l.SDM 



Pixel Aspect Ratio: [ Square Pixels 



~< 




f Save Preset... j 
^Delete Preset... J 




f_ Save Preset... } 
ft>elrte Preset... 



Step Three: 

This brings up the New Document Preset 
dialog. In the Preset Name field, enter 
your new resolution at the end of the size. 
You can turn on/off the checkboxes for 
which parameters you want saved, but 
I use the default setting to include every- 
thing (better safe than sorry, I guess). 



Step Four: 

Click OK and your new custom preset will 
appear in the New dialog's Preset pop-up 
menu. You only have to go through this 
once. Photoshop will remember your cus- 
tom settings, and they will appear in this 
Preset pop-up menu from now on. 



Step Five: 

If you decide you want to delete a preset, 
it's simple — just open the New dialog, 
choose the preset you want to delete 
from the Preset pop-up menu, and then 
click the Delete Preset button. A warning 
dialog will appear asking you to confirm 
the delete. Click Yes, and it's gone! 



How to Resize and Crop Photos 



Chapter 5 



133 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Resizing Digital 
Camera Photos 



If you're used to resizing scans, you'll find that resizing images from digital cameras 
is a bit different, primarily because scanners create high-res scans (usually 300 ppi 
or more), but the default settings for many digital cameras produce an image that is 
large in physical dimensions, but lower in pixels-per-inch (usually 72 ppi). The trick 
is to decrease the physical size of your digital camera image (and increase its 
resolution) without losing any of its quality. Here's the trick: 



Step One: 

Open the digital camera image that you 
want to resize. Press Command-R (PC: 

Ctrl-R) to make Photoshop's rulers visible. 
As you can see from the rulers, the photo 
is about 59" wide by 39" high. 



Step Two: 

Go under the Image menu and choose 
Image Size (or press Command-Option-I 

[PC: Ctrl-Alt-I]) to bring up the Image 
Size dialog. Under the Document Size 
section, the Resolution setting is 72 ppi. 
A resolution of 72 ppi is considered "low 
resolution" and is ideal for photos that will 
only be viewed onscreen (such as web 
graphics, slide shows, and so on), but it's 
too low to get high-quality results from 
a color inkjet printer, color laser printer, 
or for use on a printing press. 



I -:CjrJ.|Pji^JV.oRLH.A 




Image Size 



Pixel Dimensions: 


34.3M 


Width: 


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! Pixels hH J 








Height: 


2S16 











(_ Cancel ) 
( Auto... ) 



- D acumen 


tsize; - 




Width: 


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Height: 


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Resolution: 


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! Pixels/Inch 


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3 Scale Styles 

3 Constrain Proportions 

8 Resample Image: 



1 Bicubic Automatic 



► 134 



Chapter 5 How to Resize and Crop Photos 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



Image Size 



Pixel Dimensions: 


34.3M 


Width! 4256 


pixels 


Height: 2816 


pixels 



€ 



OK 



(_ Cancel 
( Auto.„ ) 



59. Ill 



- Document Size: 
Width: 
Height: 
Resolution: 



Inches 






39.111 



Inches 



3- 



72 



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Image Size 



— Pixel Dimensions: 


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Height: 2&16 


pixels 



(_ Cancel \ 
( Auto... j 



- Document Size; - 








Width: 


17.733 


! Inches 


j ij 










*? 

o 


Height: 


11.733 


l' i u 


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Resolution: 


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!3 Scale Styles 

2! Constrain Proportions 

□ Resample Fmage: 



Bicubic Automatic 



T) 



Step Three: 

If we plan to output this photo to any 
printing device, it's pretty clear that we'll 
need to increase the resolution to get 
good results. I wish we could just type 
in the resolution we'd like it to be in the 
Resolution field (such as 200 or 240 ppi), 
but unfortunately this "resampling" 
makes our low-res photo appear soft 
(blurry) and pixelated. That's why we 
need to turn off the Resample Image 
checkbox (it's on by default). That way, 
when we type in a Resolution setting 
that we need, Photoshop automatically 
adjusts the Width and Height of the 
image down in the exact same propor- 
tion. As your Width and Height come 
down (with Resample Image turned 
off), your Resolution goes up. Best of 
all, there's absolutely no loss of quality. 
Pretty cool! 



Step Four: 

Here I've turned off Resample Image and 
I entered 240 in the Resolution field for 
output to a color inkjet printer. (I know, 
you probably think you need a lot more 
resolution, but you don't. In fact, I never 
print with a resolution higher than 240 
ppi.) This resized my image to nearly 
12x18" so it's just about perfect for print- 
ing to my Epson Stylus Photo R2880 
printer, which makes up to 13x19"-sized 
prints — perfect! 

(Continued) 



How to Resize and Crop Photos 



Chapter 5 



135 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

Here, I've lowered the Resolution setting 
to 180 ppi. (Again, you don't need nearly 
as much resolution as you'd think, but 
180 ppi is pretty much about as low as 
you should go when printing to a color 
inkjet printer.) As you can see, the Width 
of my image is now almost 24" and the 
Height is now almost 16". Best of all, 
we did it without damaging a single 
pixel, because we were able to turn off 
Resample Image, which normally, with 
things like scans, we couldn't do. 



Step Six: 

When you click OK, you won't see the 
image window change at all — it will 
appear at the exact same size onscreen — 
but look at the rulers. You can see that it's 
now almost 16" high by almost 24" wide. 
Resizing using this technique does three 
big things: (1) it gets your physical dimen- 
sions down to size (the photo now fits 
easily on a 16x24" sheet); (2) it increases 
the resolution enough so you can out- 
put this image on a color inkjet printer; 
and (3) you haven't softened, blurred, 
or pixelated the image in any way — the 
quality remains the same — all because 
you turned off Resample Image. Note: 
Do not turn off Resample Image for 
images that you scan on a scanner — 
they start as high-res images in the first 
place. Turning Resample Image off like 
this is only for low-res photos taken with 
a digital camera. 



Image Size 



Pixel Dimensions; 


34.3M 


Width: 4256 


pixels 


Height: 2616 


pixels 



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► 136 



Chapter 5 How to Resize and Crop Photos 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



If you have a bunch of images that you need resized, or converted from TIFFs 

to JPEGs (or from PSDs to JPEGs, for that matter), then you will love the built-in 

Image Processor. It's kind of hidden in a place you might not expect it (under 

the Scripts menu), but don't let that throw you — this is a really handy, and 

really easy-to-use, totally automated tool that can save you tons of time. 



Automated Saving 
and Resizing 



_ 
Revert 


F12 


Place... 


Import 
Export 









Automate 



File Into,. 



TftSl 



Print... 

Print One Copy 



SP 



Delete All Empty Layers 



Flatten All Layer Effects 

Flatten All Masks 

Layer Comps to Files... 



Image Processor 




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O UseOfif □ Includ 


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0Save as JPEG 

Quality: |5 | 

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□ Resize to Fit 


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H:| |px 


□ Save as PSD 

□ Maximize Compatibility 


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W.| |px 


H:| |px 


□ Save as TIFF 

□ LZW Compression 


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Include ICC Profile 





Step One: 

Go under the File menu, under Scripts, 
and choose Image Processor. By the way, 
if you're working in Adobe Bridge (rather 
than Photoshop), you can Command-click 
(PC: Ctrl-click) on all the photos you want 
to apply the Image Processor to, then go 
under the Tools menu, under Photoshop, 
and choose Image Processor. That way, 
when the Image Processor opens, it 
already has those photos pegged for 
processing. Sweet! 



Step Two: 

When the Image Processor dialog opens, 
the first thing you have to do is choose 
the folder of photos you want it to "do 
its thing" to by clicking on the Select 
Folder button, then navigating to the 
folder you want and clicking Choose (PC: 
OK). If you already have some photos 
open in Photoshop, you can click on the 
Use Open Images radio button (or if you 
chose Image Processor from Bridge, the 
Select Folder button won't be there at 
all — instead it will list how many photos 
you have selected in Bridge). Then, in the 
second section, decide whether you want 
the new copies to be saved in the same 
folder or copied into a different folder. 
No big whoop (that's a technical term). 



(Continued) 



How to Resize and Crop Photos Chapter 5 137 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Three: 

The third section is where the fun begins. 
This is where you decide how many cop- 
ies of your original you're going to wind 
up with, and in what format. If you turn on 
the checkboxes for Save as JPEG, Save 
as PSD, and Save as TIFF, you're going to 
create three new copies of each photo. If 
you turn on the Resize to Fit checkboxes 
(and enter a size in the Width and Height 
fields), your copies will be resized, too (in 
the example shown here, I chose a small 
JPEG of each file, then a larger TIFF, so 
in my folder I'd find one small JPEG and 
one larger TIFF for every file in my origi- 
nal folder). 



Step Four: 

In the fourth section, if you've created 
an action that you want applied to your 
copies, you can also have that happen 
automatically. Just turn on the Run Action 
checkbox, then from the pop-up menus, 
choose which action you want to run. If 
you want to automatically embed your 
copyright info into these copies, type 
your info in the Copyright Info field. 
Lastly, there's a checkbox that lets you 
decide whether to include an ICC pro- 
file in each image or not (of course, I'm 
going to try to convince you to include 
the profile, because I included how to 
set up color management in Photoshop 
in Chapter 11). Click the Run button, sit 
back, and let it "do its thing," and be- 
fore you know it, you'll have nice, clean 
copies aplenty. 



Image Processor 



Select the images to process 

□ Include All sub-folders 



© 



[Select Folder... | / Users/ skelby... Photos/ Family 

□ Open first image to apply settings 

Select location to save processed images 
®Save in Same Location [ 



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Hi | |p* 






0SaveasTIFF 


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0Run Action: 
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► 138 



Chapter 5 How to Resize and Crop Photos 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



So, since you saw earlier how much resolution you need to have to create a 

decent-sized print, how do photographers get those huge poster-sized prints 

without having super-high-megapixel cameras? It's easy — they upsize the images 

in Photoshop, and the good news is that unless you need to resize your image 

by more than 300%, you can do this all right in Photoshop without having to 

buy a separate resizing plug-in (but if you need more than a 300% size increase, 

that's where those plug-ins, like OnOne Software's Perfect Resize, really pay off). 



Resizing for 
Poster-Sized Prints 




Pixel Dimensions: 


34. SM 


Width: 100 


H2EH5J 




1 Pivok IE 


Height:] 100 rreramrWj 



Cancel 



( Auto... ) 



Document Size: 



Width: 1 17.733 { Inches 

Height: 1 11.8 | [ Inches 



T' 



]■ 



Resolution: J24Q [ Pixels/Inch 



Scale Styles 

Constrain Proportions 

^Resample Image: 



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Ti 



Image Size 



— Pixel Dimensions: 


310.4M [was 34.5M} 


Width: 1 300 


' Percent )ftf -. 

2 


Height:] 300 


J Percent h*H 




r Auto... j 



Document Size: 
Width: |53.2 



]Q 



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]■ 



Resolution: |24Q | [ Pixels/Inch 



Scale Styles 
^Constrain Proportions 
^ Re sample Image: 



1 Bicubic Automatic 



Ti 



Step One: 

Open the photo you want to resize, then 
go under the Image menu and choose 
Image Size. When the Image Size dialog 
appears, in the Pixel Dimensions section 
at the top, to the right of the Width field, 
you'll see a pop-up menu where Pixels 
is chosen (if this section isn't active, turn 
on the Resample Image checkbox at the 
bottom). Click on that menu and choose 
Percent (as shown here). Both the Width 
and Height will change to Percent, be- 
cause they're linked together by default. 



Step Two: 

Now, type in either 200% or 300% 
(although there is some debate about 
this, it seems to work best if you move 
up/down in 100% increments) in the 
Width field (again, since they're linked, 
the Height field will automatically change 
to the same number). 

(Continued) 



How to Resize and Crop Photos 



Chapter 5 



139 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Three: 

At the bottom of the dialog is a pop-up 
menu that decides which algorithm is 
used to upsize your photo. The default 
is Bicubic Automatic, and I use that for 
most everyday resizing stuff, but when 
it comes to jumping in big increments, 
like 200% or 300%, I switch to Bicubic 
Smoother (which Adobe says is "best 
for enlargement"), as shown here. 



Step Four: 

My buddy (and Epson printing expert) 
Vincent Versace breaks this rule. Accord- 
ing to Vincent's research, the key to his 
resizing technique is to not use the 
sampling method Adobe recommends 
(Bicubic Smoother), but instead to choose 
Bicubic Sharper, which he feels provides 
better results. So, which one is the right 
one for you? Try both on the same image 
(that's right — just do a test print), and see 
if you can see a visible difference. Here's 
the final image resized to around 53x35" 
(you can see the size in the rulers by 
pressing Command-R [PC: Ctrl-R]). 



Image Size 



Pixel Dimensions: 
Width: :3QG 


310. 4M (was 34. SM) 

I Percent h§<4 -\ 




Height:] 300 


j Percent h*H J 



OK 
( ^ Cancel ^ 

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Width: |S3.2 



] 



Ti 



Height: 1 3S.4 | j Inches 



]■ 



Resolution: J24Q [ Pixels/Inch 



~l 



c^ScaleStvles 



M Constr; Nearest Neighbor (preserve hard edges) 
\V\ Bilinear 

Bicubic (best for smooth gradients) 
«:IIJII.IIXH,.I.I.U.|.JJI,I14U,UJ,II ; IJ.IJ,,IJ.U1 

Bicubic Sharper (best for reduction) 

Bicubic Automatic 




©^O 



© Resizing Poster.jpg @ 6.25% (RGB/ 6*) * 




► 140 



Chapter 5 How to Resize and Crop Photos 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



Adobe has been tweaking the way we straighten images for the past few versions of 

Photoshop, and in Photoshop CS6, it's now the fastest and easiest way yet, and it's 

built right into the Crop tool's options. (Back in CS5, you had to use the Ruler tool in 

the Toolbox for straightening, which wasn't exactly obvious — they needed a tool 

named Straighten, so people could actually find it. Thankfully, now there is just that.) 



Straightening 
Crooked Photos 




Step One: 

Open the photo that needs straight- 
ening, click on the Crop tool (C) in the 
Toolbox, and then click on the Straighten 
tool up in the Options Bar. Now, find 
something in your photo that's supposed 
to be straight or relatively straight (the 
water's edge, in this example). Click-and- 
drag the Straighten tool horizontally along 
this straight edge in your photo, starting 
from the left and extending to the right 
(as shown here). 



(Continued) 



How to Resize and Crop Photos Chapter 5 141 i 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Two: 

When you release the mouse button, 
your photo rotates the exact amount 
to perfectly straighten the photo. One 
nice feature here is that it automatically 
resizes the cropping border, so that when 
you lock in your crop, you don't have 
any gray gaps in the corners (if you 
ignore the cropping border, and look 
at the whole image now, see those trian- 
gular gray areas? Those would be white 
if Photoshop didn't crop in like this). Now, 
just press the Return (PC: Enter) key to 
lock in your straightening, and it straight- 
ens and crops the image down to just 
what you see inside the cropping border 
(the final straightened image is shown 
here below). 



n^n 



|, Q Straighten jpg @> 25% (Crop Preview, RGB/6") 





► 142 



Chapter 5 How to Resize and Crop Photos 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



There's a different set of rules we use for maintaining as much quality as possible 
when making an image smaller, and there are a couple of different ways to do just 
that (we'll cover the two main ones here). Luckily, maintaining image quality is much 
easier when sizing down than when scaling up (in fact, photos often look dramatically 
better — and sharper — when scaled down, especially if you follow these guidelines). 



Making Your 
Photos Smaller 
(Downsizing) 



Image Size 



Pixel Dimensions: 19. OM 


Width: 


B171 


! Pixels hH n 
1 *P 

1 Pixels t+| J 






Height: 


2096 









(_ Cancel 
£ Autou j 



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tSize: - 




Width: 


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f i u 


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Height: 


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Resolution: 


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1 Pixels/Inch 


3 







Scale Styles 

Constrain Proportions 

Sflesample Image: 



I Bicubic Automatic 



Image Size 



~~ Pixel Dimensions: 


6.13M (was 19.0M) 


Width: 


1800 


[ Pixels hH n 

Is 

[Pixels hH 








Height: 


1190 











(^ Cancel ^ ) 
(_ Auto... ) 



— Document Size: - 


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6 


1 inches ^H -i 

„ , Is 

| Inches : 1 






Height: 


3.966 






Resolution: 


300 


f Pixels/Inch C 1 









Scale Styles 

Constrain Proportions 

HResample Image: 



Bicubic Automatic 



lB 



Downsizing photos where the 
resolution is already 300 ppi: 

Although earlier we discussed how 
to change image size if your digi- 
tal camera gives you 72-ppi images 
with large physical dimensions (like 
24x42" deep), what do you do if your 
camera gives you 300-ppi images 
at smaller physical dimensions (like a 
10x6" at 300 ppi)? Basically, you turn 
on Resample Image (in the Image Size 
dialog under the Image menu), then 
simply type in the desired size (in this 
example, we want a 6x4" final image 
size), and click OK (don't change the 
Resolution setting, just click OK). The 
image will be scaled down to size, 
and the resolution will remain at 
300 ppi. IMPORTANT: When you scale 
down using this method, it's likely 
that the image will soften a little bit, 
so after scaling, you'll want to apply 
the Unsharp Mask filter to bring back 
any sharpness lost in the resizing (go 
to Chapter 10 to see what settings 
to use). 



(Continued) 



How to Resize and Crop Photos Chapter 5 143 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Making one photo smaller without 
shrinking the whole document: 

If you're working with more than one 
image in the same document, you'll 
resize a bit differently. To scale down 
a photo on a layer (like this photo of a 
Venice canal, which is on its own layer), 
first click on that photo's layer in the 
Layers panel, then press Command-T 
(PC: Ctrl-T) to bring up Free Transform 
(it puts little handles around your image 
on that layer, kind of like what the Crop 
tool does). Press-and-hold the Shift key 
(to keep the photo proportional), grab 
a corner handle, and drag inward (here, 
I've grabbed the top-right corner han- 
dle and dragged inward to shrink the 
image). When the size looks good, press 
Return (PC: Enter). If the image looks 
softer after resizing it, apply the Unsharp 
Mask filter (see Chapter 10 for settings) 
to bring that sharpness back. 



TIP: Reaching the Free 
Transform Handles 

If you drag an image from one open 

document to another (like I did here, 

where I dragged the original Venice 

canal photo over onto the old world map 

document), there's a pretty good chance 

you'll have to resize the dragged image, 

so it fits within your other image. And, if 

the image is larger (as in this case), when 

you bring up Free Transform, you won't 

be able to reach the resizing handles 

(they'll extend right off the edges of 

the document). Luckily, there's a trick 

to reaching those handles: just press 

Command-0 (PC: Ctrl-0), and your 

window will automatically resize so you 

can reach all the handles — no matter 

how far outside your image area they 

once were. Two things: (1) This only 

works once you have Free Transform 

active, and (2) it's Command-0 — that's 

the number zero, not the letter O. 



a Resize Coilage.psd @ 100% (Layer 1, RGB/ 8*) 





► 144 



Chapter 5 How to Resize and Crop Photos 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



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Resizing problems when 
dragging between documents: 

This one gets a lot of people, because at 
first glance it just doesn't make sense. You 
have two documents open, and they look 
approximately the same size (as seen here, 
at top), but when you drag the sunflower 
photo onto the blank document, the sun- 
flower photo appears really small (as seen 
below). Why? Although the documents 
appear to be the same size, they're not. 
The sunflower photo is a low-resolution, 
72-ppi (pixels per inch) image, but the 
blank document is a high-resolution, 300- 
ppi image. The tip-off that you're not re- 
ally seeing them at the same size is found 
in each photo's title bar. Here, the sun- 
flower image is displayed at 100%, but 
the Untitled-2 document is displayed at 
only 25% (so, it's much larger than it ap- 
pears). The key is that when you're drag- 
ging images between documents, they 
need to be the same size and resolution. 

TIP: Automated Cropping 
& Straightening 

Want to save time the next time you're 
scanning prints? Try gang scanning 
(fitting as many photos on your flat- 
bed scanner as you can and scanning 
them as one big single image), and then 
you can have Photoshop automatically 
straighten each individual image and 
place it into its own separate document. 
You do this by going under the File menu, 
under Automate, and choosing Crop 
and Straighten Photos. No dialog will 
appear. Instead, Photoshop will look for 
straight edges in your photos, straighten 
the photos, and copy each into its own 
separate document. 



How to Resize and Crop Photos 



Chapter 5 



145 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Resizing Just Parts 
of Your Image 
Using "Content- 
Aware" Scaling 



We've all run into situations where our image is a little smaller than the area where 
we need it to fit. For example, if you resize a digital camera image so it fits within 
a traditional 8x10" image area, you'll have extra space either above or below your 
image (or both). That's where Content-Aware Scaling comes in — it lets you resize 
one part of your image, while keeping the important parts intact (basically, it 
analyzes the image and stretches, or shrinks, parts of the image it thinks aren't 
as important). Here's how to use it: 



Step One: 

Create a new document at 8x10" and 
240 ppi. Open a digital camera image, 
get the Move tool (V), and drag-and-drop 
it onto the new document, then press 
Command-T (PC: Ctrl-T) to bring up 
Free Transform. Press-and-hold the Shift 
key, then grab a corner point and drag 
inward to scale the image down, so it fits 
within the 8x10" area (as shown here on 
top), and press Return (PC: Enter). Now, 
in the image on top, there's white space 
above and below the photo. If you want 
it to fill the 8x10 space, you could use 
Free Transform to stretch the image to do 
so, but you'd get a short, squatty version 
of the jet (seen at bottom). This is where 
Content-Aware Scale comes in. 





► 146 Chapter 5 How to Resize and Crop Photos 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



: 



Photoshop File 



Image Layer Type Select F 
Can't Undo 3SZ f 

Step Forward 
Step Backward 




: : ,x " i!R!fl!B!l ~' I&S3&M ^ - EJSItEM 



Untitled- 1 @ 33.3% (Layer 1, RCB/8) * 






Step Two: 

Go under the Edit menu and choose 
Content-Aware Scale (or press Com- 
mand-Option-Shift-C [PC: Ctrl-Alt- 
Shift-C]). Grab the top handle, drag 
straight upward, and notice that it 
stretches the sky upward, but pretty 
much leaves the jet intact. When you've 
dragged far enough, press Return (PC: 
Enter) to lock in your change. {Note: 
The button that looks like a person in 
the Options Bar tells Content-Aware 
Scale that there are people in the photo, 
so it tries to avoid stretching anything 
with a skin tone.) 



Step Three: 

There are two more controls you need 
to know about: First, if you try Content- 
Aware Scale and it stretches your subject 
more than you want, get the Lasso tool (L) 
and draw a selection around your subject 
(as shown here), then go under the Select 
menu and choose Save Selection. When 
the Save Selection dialog appears, just 
click OK. Then bring up Content-Aware 
Scale again, but this time, go up in the 
Options Bar and choose your selection 
from the Protect pop-up menu (as shown 
here) to tell Photoshop where your subject 
is. Now you can drag up or down to 
fill the empty space with the least pos- 
sible stretching. 



(Continued) 



How to Resize and Crop Photos Chapter 5 147 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Four: 

There's also an Amount control up in 
the Options Bar, which determines how 
much stretching protection is provided. 
At its default of 100%, it's protecting as 
much as possible. At 50%, it's a mix of 
protected resizing and regular Free Trans- 
form, and for some photos that works 
best. The nice thing is the Amount con- 
trol is live, so as long as your handles 
are still in place, you can lower the 
Amount and see live onscreen how it 
affects your resizing. 



n 



•: BBBEM ?? -:^^^J|- ~FH i:: (Z 



-*- 




► 148 



Chapter 5 How to Resize and Crop Photos 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



Photoshop Killer Tips 



Instant Background Layer Unlocking 

M ■ 




This is one of those little tips that just 
makes you smile. To instantly turn your 
Background layer into a regular layer 
without having a dialog pop up first, 
just click-and-drag the little lock icon 
to the right of the word "Background" 
straight into the trash (thanks to Adobe's 
Julieanne Kost for sharing this one). 

Get Your Channel Shortcuts Back 

Back in CS3, and all earlier versions of 
Photoshop, you could look at the indivi- 
dual color channels for a photo by pressing 
Command-1, Command-2, Command-3, 
and so on (on a PC, you'd use Ctrl-1, Ctrl-2, 
etc., instead). In CS4, they changed the 
shortcuts, which totally bummed out a lot of 
longtime users, but you have the option of 
bringing those glory days of channel short- 
cuts back to the pre-CS4 era. Go under the 
Edit menu, choose Keyboard Shortcuts, 
then near the top of the dialog, turn on the 
Use Legacy Channel Shortcuts checkbox. 






KentiMril MiartLuta *rvj Mt"ji 




Set Defaults in Layer Styles 

You can set your own custom defaults 
for layer styles like Drop Shadow or Glow. 
All you have to do is create a new layer in 
the Layers panel by clicking on the Create 
a New Layer icon, then choose the layer 
style you want from the Add a Layer Style 
icon's pop-up menu (like Outer Glow, for 
example). In the Layer Style dialog, enter 
your own settings (like changing the glow 
from yeech yellow to white, or black, or 
anything but yeech yellow), then click 
on the Make Default button near the 
bottom of the dialog. To return to the 
factory default (yeech) settings, click 
the Reset to Default button. 



■\M 



Jitter: l5~~ 



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[ Make Defcujft j (^ Reset to Default j 



How to Know if You Used the 
"Blend If" Sliders on a Layer 

CS6 now adds an icon on the right of 
any layer where you've adjusted the 
Blend If sliders in the Blending Options 
of the Layer Style dialog. The icon looks 
like two little over-lapping squares, but 
it's more than an icon — it's a button. 
Click on it and it brings up the Blend If 
sliders in the Layer Style dialog. 




Layer Mask from Layer Transparency 

Here's a nice time saver: you can make 
the transparent areas of any layer into a 
mask in just one step: go under the Layer 
menu, under Layer Mask, and choose 
From Transparency. 



Type Select Filter 3D 
New ► 

Duplicate Layer- 
Delete 



Rename Layer... 
Layer Style 
Smart Filter 



New Fill Layer 

New Adjustment Layer 

Layer Content Options... 




Seeing Your Final Crop 
in Camera Raw 

When you crop a photo in Camera Raw, 
you can see the final cropped image 
without having to open the image in 
Photoshop. Once your cropping border 
is in place, just change tools and you'll 
see the cropped version (in some previous 
versions, the cropped away area was still 
visible; it was just dimmed). 

One Click to Close All Your Tabs 

If you're using the Tabs feature (all your 
documents open as tabs), then you'll defi- 
nitely want to know this tip: to close all your 
open tabs at once, just Right-click on any 
tab and choose Close All. 



nrftmnipj ■ -v HI.I...1 




How to Resize and Crop Photos 



Chapter 5 



149 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Photoshop Killer Tips 



Save 16-Bit to JPEG 

Back in CS4, if you worked with 16-bit 
photos (and a lot of RAW shooters do, 
since that's the default bit-depth for RAW 
photos), when you went to the Save dialog 
to save your photo, there was no option 
to save your image as a JPEG, because 
JPEGs have to be in 8-bit mode, so you'd 
have to close the dialog, convert to 8-bit, 
then go and Save again. That has changed 
and JPEG is now a choice, but what it does 
is makes a copy of the file, which it con- 
verts to 8-bit, and saves that instead. This 



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leaves your 16-bit image still open on- 
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If you want to save the 16-bit version sepa- 
rately, you'll need to save it as a PSD or 
TIFF like before. For me, once I know it has 
saved an 8-bit JPEG, I don't need the 16- 
bit version any longer, so I close the image 
and click the Don't Save button, but again, 
that's just me. 



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If you're using Camara Raw's Lens Correc- 
tions panel to do things like straighten 
buildings or flatten rounded horizon lines, 
press the letter V on your keyboard, and 
an alignment grid appears over your image 
to help you line things up. To hide it again, 
press V again. 

Assign a Keyboard Shortcut 
to the Color Picker 

You can assign a keyboard shortcut to 

bring up the Foreground (or Background) 

Color Picker (this is handier than it sounds). 

Go under the Edit menu, under Keyboard 

Shortcuts, and from the Shortcuts For 

pop-up menu, choose Tools. Then scroll 

down near the bottom, and you'll see 

Foreground Color Picker and Background 

Color Picker. Click on whichever one you 

want, and type in the shortcut you want. 

I have to tell you up front: most of the 

good shortcuts are already taken (in fact, 

almost all combinations of shortcuts are 

already taken), but my buddy Dave Cross 

came up with a good idea. He doesn't use 



the Pen tool all that much, so he used the 
letter P (for Picker). When you enter "P," 
it's going to warn you that it's already 
being used for something else, and if you 
click the Accept and Go to Conflict button 
at the bottom left, it assigns P to the Color 
Picker you chose, and then sends you to 
the Pen tool to choose a new shortcut. If 
you don't need to assign one to the Pen 
tool (you don't use it much either), then 
just leave it blank and click OK. 

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Visual Way to Change Your 
Brush Size and Softness 

This is incredibly handy, because you can 

actually see and control the exact size 

and amount of softness for your current 

brush tip. Press-and-hold Option-Ctrl 

(PC: Alt-Ctrl) then click-and-drag (PC: 

Right-click-and-drag) up/down to control 

the softness/hardness of the brush, and 

left/right to control the size. 




► 150 



Chapter 5 How to Resize and Crop Photos 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



Photoshop Killer Tips 



Working with Tabbed Documents 




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When working with multiple documents 
while using the Tabs features, to see any 
tabbed image, just click on its tab at the 
top of the image window or press Ctrl- 
Tab to cycle through them one by one. To 
turn tabbing off, go under the Photoshop 
(PC: Edit) menu, under Preferences, and 
choose Interface, then turn off the Open 
Documents as Tabs checkbox. Also, you'll 
probably want to turn off the Enable 
Floating Document Window Docking 
checkbox, too, or it will dock your single 
open image. 

Setting Up Your Workspace 

CS6 comes with a number of built-in 
workspace layouts for different tasks with 
just the panels visible Adobe thought 




you'd need. You can find them by clicking 
on the pop-up menu at the right end of 
the Options Bar. To create your own cus- 
tom workspace layout, just click-and-drag 



the panels where you want them. To nest 
a panel (so they appear one in front of 
another), drag one panel over the other. 
When you see a blue outline appear, 
release the mouse button and it nests. 
More panels can be found under the Win- 
dow menu. Once your panels are set up 
where you want them, go under the Win- 
dow menu, under Workspace, and choose 
New Workspace, to save your layout so 
it's always one click away (it will appear in 
the pop-up menu). Also, if you use a work- 
space and change a panel's location, it re- 
members. That's okay, but you'd think that 
clicking on your workspace would return 
things to normal. It doesn't. Instead, you 
have to go into that pop-up menu and 
choose Reset [your workspace name]. 

Getting Sharp Edges on 
Your Stroke Layer Effect 

If you've applied a large stroke using 
the Stroke layer effect (under the Edit 
menu) or Stroke layer style (by clicking 
on the Add a Layer Style icon at the bot- 
tom of the Layers panel and choosing 
Stroke from the pop-up menu), you've 
probably already noticed that the edges 
start to get rounded, and the bigger you 
make the stroke, the rounder they get. 
So, what's the trick to nice, sharp straight 
edges? Switch the Stroke position or loca- 
tion to Inside. That's it! 



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White Balance Quick Fix 

If you have an image whose white 
balance is way off, and you didn't shoot 
it in RAW, try this: go under the Image 
menu, under Adjustments, and choose 
Match Color. When the Match Color dia- 
log appears, just turn on the Neutralize 
checkbox in the Image Options ssection. 
It works better than you'd think for most 
white balance problems (plus, you can 
write an action to do all that for you). 

Change Ruler Increments 

If you want to quickly change the unit of 
measure in your ruler (say, from pixels to 
inches or from centimeters to millimeters), 
just Right-click anywhere inside the Rulers 
and choose your new unit of measurement 
from the pop-up menu that appears. 
O 




Using "Scrubby Sliders" 

Anytime you see a numerical field in 
Photoshop (like the Opacity field in the 
Layers panel, for example), you can change 
the setting without typing in a number, or 
dragging the tiny slider. Instead, click di- 
rectly on the word "Opacity" and drag left 
(to lower the opacity) or right (to increase 
it). This is very fast, and totally addictive, 
and if you're not using it yet, you've got to 
try it. There's no faster way to make quick 
changes (also, press-and-hold the Shift key 
while using it, and it goes even faster). 



How to Resize and Crop Photos 



Chapter 5 



151 4 




Photo by Scott Kelby Exposure: 1/250 sec | Aperture Value: //2.8 



Chapter 6 How to Create Stunning B&W Images 




Black & White 

how to create stunning b&w images 



I know what you're thinking: "He's given up on the whole 
movie name/song title/TV show thing." But, actually, the 
"Black & White" you see above is from the song by the 
1970s hit machine Three Dog Night. (Remember the song: 
"The ink is black. The page is white. Together we learn to 
read and write"? I can't believe with captivating lyrics like 
that, these guys aren't still crankin' out the hits.) Anyway, 
back in the CS4 intro for this chapter, I wrote that I had toyed 
with the idea of using the song "Black Widow" by Motley 
Crue, but I chose not to for a very legitimate (yet, secret 
until now) reason: I couldn't figure out how to add those two 
little dots above the letter "u" in Crue, so I went with Elvis 
Costello's "Black and White World" instead (it was an easy 
choice, as it contains no crazy dots above any letters). I have 
to admit, I am a bit embarrassed that I didn't know what 
those little dots are called, so I did a Google search for this 



phrase: "two little dots above the letter U." It returned six 
search results, including a Facebook group called (and I'm 
not making this up): "It is a crime to write uber without the 
Umlaut." At that moment I realized two things: (1) it's called 
an umlaut, and (2) people get totally psychotic about things 
like a missing umlaut. This is probably why, in the printed 
version of my CS4 book, not only did my editor Kim add the 
umlaut above the "u" for me, but she also added an umlaut 
over the "o" in Motley. You're thinking, "Wow, she's good!" 
and she totally is, but I know her dirty little secret. She only 
knew there was a problem there to fix because she's a huge 
"big hair bands from the '80s" fan. If, instead, she had been a 
fan of Sheena Easton or Garth Brooks back then, you know 
and I know she would have changed it to read "Motley Crew," 
just like she referred to the song "Walk This Way" as being 
performed by Arrow Smith. (Kidding, Kim. Just a joke, really!) 



153 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Converting to 

Black and White 

Using Camera Raw 



Although Photoshop has its own Black & White conversion adjustment layer, I never, 
ever use it, but that's only because it totally stinks (I don't know any pros who use it). 
I think you can create a much better black-and-white conversion using Camera Raw, 
and it's much faster and looks infinitely better. Well, that is as long as you don't get 
suckered into using the HSL/Grayscale panel in Camera Raw, which is nothing more 
than the Black & White adjustment layer hiding in Camera Raw, trying to sucker in 
some poor unsuspecting soul. 



Step One: 

We'll start by opening a color image in 
Camera Raw (as seen here). Converting 
from color to black and white is simple- 
just click on the HSL/Grayscale icon (the 
fourth one from the left) and then turn 
on the Convert to Grayscale checkbox 
at the top of the panel (as seen here). 
That's all you want to do here (trust me). 
By the way, I did two little fixes to the 
photo unrelated to the B&W conversion: 
(1) I straightened it using the Straighten 
tool (it was a little crooked), and (2) the 
building (the back side of the Taj Mahal) 
had a lens distortion problem, so I ad- 
justed the Vertical distortion in the Lens 
Corrections panel (as shown here). 



Step Two: 

Once you click on that Convert to Gray- 
scale checkbox, it gives you an incredibly 
flat conversion (like you see here), and 
you might be tempted to drag those color 
sliders around, until you realize that since 
the photo is already converted to black 
and white, you're kind of dragging around 
in the dark. So, the best advice I can give 
you is to get out of this panel just as fast 
as you can. It's the only hope for making 
this flat-looking grayscale image blossom 
into a beautiful butterfly of a B&W image 
(come on, I at least get five points for the 
butterfly metaphor). 




► 154 



Chapter 6 



How to Create Stunning B&W Images 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



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Step Three: 

When you talk to photographers about 
great B&Ws, you'll always hear them talk 
about high-contrast B&Ws, so you already 
know what you need to do — you need to 
add lots of contrast. That basically means 
making the whites whiter and the blacks 
blacker, which has been made easier to 
do in Photoshop CS6 now that the Basic 
panel has both Whites and Blacks sliders 
(not to mention a Contrast slider that now 
actually does a good job). So, start in the 
Basic panel. Normally, you'd adjust the 
Exposure slider to start things off, but 
in this case, the image looks okay in the 
midtones (actually, the image is all mid- 
tones), so if you wanted, you could drag 
a little to the left to darken it, but I'm just 
leaving it set as-is. However, this flat-look- 
ing image needs lots of contrast, so let's 
drag the Contrast slider way over to the 
right (here, I dragged to +63). That looks 
a little better, but not a bunch — we've 
got more to do! 



Step Four: 

Now, let's set our white and black points. 
Start by dragging the Whites slider as far 
to the right as you can without clipping 
the highlights (in other words, drag until 
you see the white triangle in the top right 
of the histogram appear [that's the high- 
light clipping warning], then back it off just 
a tiny bit, until it turns black again). Here, 
I dragged it over to +46. Now, drag the 
Blacks slider to the left until it really starts 
to look nice and contrasty (as shown here, 
where I dragged to -59). Okay, it's start- 
ing to look a lot better, but we're not 
quite there yet. 



(Continued) 



How to Create Stunning B&W Images Chapter 6 155 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

The insides of the arches are kind of dark, 
so drag the Shadows slider to the right 
to lighten those areas a bit (I dragged to 
+41). Then, increase the Clarity amount 
quite a bit, which adds midtone contrast 
and makes the image more punchy and a 
little brighter, too (here, I pushed it over 
to +58). Also, the sky looks really white, 
so let's pull back those highlights by drag- 
ging the Highlights slider to the left (here, 
I dragged to -43). Now, if you feel like it 
could still be more contrasty (I do), then 
go to the Tone Curve panel and choose 
Strong Contrast from the Curve pop- 
up menu at the top of the Point tab (as 
shown here on the right). If it's too much 
contrast, try Medium Contrast instead. 



Step Six: 

There is one problem that is unique to 
this particular photo — the towers on 
the left and right look washed out, so 
get the Adjustment Brush (K), click on 
the + (plus sign) button to the right of 
Contrast (to reset the sliders to 0), and 
then increase the Contrast slider a bunch. 
Now, drag the Shadows slider to the left 
and then paint over the towers (as shown 
here). A before/after is shown on the 
next page. Pretty striking difference, eh? 



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► 156 



Chapter 6 



How to Create Stunning B&W Images 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 




After 



How to Create Stunning B&W Images Chapter 6 1 57 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



My Three-Click 

Method for Converting 

to B&W (Once You're 

Already in Photoshop) 



Some of the best techniques unfold when you least expect it, and this 
technique is a perfect example. I was working on a completely different 
technique when I stumbled upon this and I fell in love, and now you're only 
three clicks away from a nice, crisp, high-contrast B&W image (once you're 
already in Photoshop. Otherwise, I would do it in Camera Raw, because you 
have more control). Plus, I'll show you how you can tweak your conversion, along 
with a variation, with just a couple more clicks. It's a B&W clicking lovefest. 



Step One: 

Open the color photo you want to 
convert into a high-contrast B&W 
image. You start by pressing the letter 
D to set your Foreground color to 
black, and then in the Adjustments 
panel, click on the Gradient Map icon 
(it looks like a horizontal gradient — 
it's shown circled in red here). 



Step Two: 

Once you click that icon, the Gradient 
Map options appear in the Properties 
panel, but you don't have to do anything 
there. Not a bad B&W conversion, eh? 
Believe it or not, just the simple act of 
applying this black-to-white gradient map 
will almost always give you a much better 
conversion than choosing Grayscale from 
the Image menu's Mode submenu, and 
I feel it's generally even better than both 
the default and Auto settings in the Black 
& White adjustment dialog. However, we 
can add another click or two and take this 
conversion up a big notch. 



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► 158 



Chapter 6 



How to Create Stunning B&W Images 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



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Step Three: 

Now you're going to add some con- 
trast the easy way. Click on the Levels 
adjustment layer icon in the Adjustments 
panel (it's the second icon on the top 
row). Here's the good news: when the 
Levels options appear in the Properties 
panel, you're not actually going to adjust 
the Levels. All you need to do is change 
the layer blend mode of this adjustment 
layer from Normal to Soft Light (at the 
top of the Layers panel, as shown here) 
and look how much more contrasty, and 
just generally yummy, this photo looks 
now. If choosing Soft Light for the particu- 
lar photo you're working on doesn't add 
enough contrast, then try Overlay mode 
instead (it's more contrasty). Okay, that's 
it — three clicks and you're done. Now, if 
you're feeling "dicky," there is a way to 
tweak your conversion if you really feel 
like it (not necessary usually, but in case 
you want to, I'll show ya). 



Step Four: 

In the Layers panel, click on the Gradient 
Map adjustment layer (the middle layer) 
to make it active. Now, click directly on 
the gradient in the Properties panel, 
which brings up the Gradient Editor dia- 
log. Once it appears, click once directly 
in the center, right below the gradient 
ramp (as shown circled here) to add a 
color stop (it looks like a little house) 
right below your gradient. Don't click OK 
yet. At this point, your image will look re- 
ally dark, but that's okay — we're not 
done yet. 



(Continued) 



How to Create Stunning B&W Images Chapter 6 1 59 ^ 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

Double-click directly on that color stop 
you just created and Photoshop's Color 
Picker appears (seen here). Click-and- 
drag your cursor all the way over to the 
left side of the Color Picker, right up 
against the edge (as shown here), and 
pick a medium gray color. As you slide 
up and down that left side, let go of the 
mouse button and look at your photo. 
You'll see the midtones changing as 
you drag, and you can stop at any point 
where the image looks good to you. 
Once you find a spot that looks good 
(in our case, one in the center), click OK 
to close the Color Picker (don't close the 
Gradient Editor, just the Color Picker at 
this point, because there's another tweak 
you can do. Of course, this is all optional 
[you could have stopped back at Step 
Three], but now we have some extra 
editing power if we want it). 



Step Six: 

Once you're back at the Gradient Editor, 
and your color stop is now gray, you can 
drag that middle gray stop around to 
adjust the tone of your image (as shown 
here). What's weird is you drag the oppo- 
site way that the gradient shows. For 
example, to darken the photo, you drag 
to the right, toward the white end of the 
gradient, and to lighten the photo, you 
drag left toward the dark end. Freaky, 
I know. One other thing: unlike almost 
every other slider in all of Photoshop, as 
you drag that color stop, you do not get 
a live preview of what's happening — you 
have to release the mouse button and 
then it shows you the results of your 
dragging. Click OK, and you're done. 




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► 160 



Chapter 6 



How to Create Stunning B&W Images 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 




Step Seven: 

Here's a quick variation you can try 
that's just one more click: go to the 
Layers panel and lower the Opacity of 
your Gradient Map adjustment layer to 
80% (as shown here). This bleeds back 
in a little of the color, and gives a really 
nice subtle "wash" effect (compare this 
slightly-colored photo with the full-color 
photo in Step One, and you'll see what 
I mean. It's kinda nice, isn't it?). A before 
and after is shown below, but it's just 
the three-click version (not all the other 
tweaking we added after the fact). 




Photoshop's Black & White Conversion 
(using the Auto button) 



Scott's "Three-Click Method" (using just the 
three clicks, not the extra tweaking) 



How to Create Stunning B&W Images Chapter 6 161< 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Split Toning 



Split toning is a traditional darkroom special effect where you apply one tint to 
your photo's highlights, and one tint to your photo's shadow areas, and you even 
can control the saturation of each tint and the balance between the two for some 
interesting effects. Although split-toning effects can be applied to both color and 
B&W photos, you probably see it most often applied to a B&W image, so here we'll 
start by converting the photo to black and white, then apply the split-tone effect. 



Step One: 

Start by converting your full-color 
image to black and white by clicking 
on the HSL/Grayscale icon (the fourth 
icon from the left) at the top of the Panel 
area and then just turning on the Convert 
to Grayscale checkbox at the top of the 
panel (see page 154 for one of my favor- 
ite methods for converting to black and 
white). Note: I made some adjustments 
in the Basic panel (shown here), before 
I turned on the checkbox. 



Step Two: 

Now, click on the Split Toning icon (the 
fifth icon from the left) at the top of the 
Panel area. At this point, dragging either 
the Highlights or Shadows Hue slider 
does absolutely nothing because, by 
default, the Saturation sliders are set 
to 0. So, do yourself a favor and drag 
the Highlights Saturation slider over to 
around 25, so at least you can see what 
it looks like while you're dragging the 
Hue slider. As soon as you do this, you'll 
see the default tint color for Hue (which 
is kind of pinkish). 

TIP: Seeing Your Colors 

To temporarily see your hues at their full 
100% saturation, just press-and-hold the 
Option (PC: Alt) key, then click-and-drag 
a Hue slider. It helps when picking your 
colors, if you don't feel like taking my 
advice and increasing the saturation (like 
I mentioned at the end of Step Two). 



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► 162 



Chapter 6 



How to Create Stunning B&W Images 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 




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Step Three: 

Now that you can see what's going on, 
click-and-drag the Highlights Hue slider 
until you find a highlight hue you like. 
For this image, I'm using a Hue setting 
of 50, and I also increased the Highlights 
Saturation amount to around 50 to make 
the tint a bit heavier. 



Step Four: 

Let's add a teal tint to the shadows (a 
fairly popular spilt-tone combination) by 
dragging the Shadows Saturation slider 
to 50 (so you can see the shadows hue), 
then drag the Shadows Hue slider over 
to 215, and now you see that teal tint 
in the shadow areas. There is one more 
control — a Balance slider, which lets 
you control whether your split tone 
favors your highlight or shadow color. 
Just drag left, then back right, and 
you'll instantly see what this slider does 
(here, I dragged the Balance slider over 
to the left to -10, and you can see that 
the split tone now has more teal in the 
shadow areas). If you do find a split- 
toning combination you like (hey, it 
could happen), I'd definitely jump to 
page 167 to find out how to turn that 
into a one-click preset, so you don't 
have to go through all this every time 
you want a quick split-tone effect. 



How to Create Stunning B&W Images 



Chapter 6 



163 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Duotones Made 
Crazy Easy 



Don't let the fact that this technique fits neatly on one page make you think it's 
not a rocking technique, because this is the best and fastest duotone technique 
I've ever used (and it's the only one I use in my own workflow). I used to do a more 
complicated version, but then my buddy Terry White showed me a technique 
he learned from one of his buddies whose duotones he adored, and well... now 
I'm passing it on to you. It's very easy, but man does it work like a charm. 



Step One: 

Start by converting your color image 
to black and white by clicking on the 
HSL/Grayscale icon (the fourth icon from 
the left) at the top of the Panel area and 
then turning on the Convert to Grayscale 
checkbox at the top of the panel (see 
page 154 for one of my favorite methods 
for converting to black and white). 



Step Two: 

Now, click on the Split Toning icon at the 
top of the Panel area (it's the fifth icon 
from the left), and then, in the Shadows 
section, increase the Saturation amount 
to 25 as a starting point. Next, just drag 
the Shadows Hue slider until you have 
a nice sepia-tone hue (I generally use 
something around 28). If you think it's too 
intense, lower the Saturation and you're 
done. That's right — completely ignore the 
Highlights controls altogether, and you'll 
love the results you get (ignore the pow- 
erful pull of the Highlights sliders. I know 
you feel on some level that they will make 
things better, but you are already hold- 
ing the magical key to great duotones. 
Don't blow it!). That's it — that's the whole 
ball of wax (I told you it was easy, but 
don't let that fool you. Try printing one 
of these and you'll see what I mean). 
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► 164 



Chapter 6 



How to Create Stunning B&W Images 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



If you've ever wondered how the pros get those deep, rich-looking 
B&W photos, you might be surprised to learn that what you were looking at 
weren't just regular B&W photos, instead they were quadtones or tritones — 
B&W photos made up of three or four different grays and/or brown colors 
to make what appears to be a B&W photo, but with much greater depth. 
For years, Photoshop had a bunch of very slick presets buried somewhere 
on your computer, but luckily, in CS6, they're just one click away. 



Quadtoning for 
Richer B&Ws 




Step One: 

Open the photo you want to apply your 
quadtoning effect to (the term quad- 
toning just means the final photo will 
use four different inks mixed together to 
achieve the effect. Tritones use three inks, 
and do I really have to mention how many 
duotones use?). Quadtoning effects seem 
to look best with (but are not limited to) 
two kinds of photos: (1) landscapes, and 
(2) people. But, here, we're going to apply 
it to an image of the inside of a church. 



Step Two: 

To create a quadtone, you'll have to 
convert to Grayscale mode first, but 
by now you know what a flat-looking 
B&W photo that creates, so instead try 
this (from a few pages ago): Press the 
letter D to set your Foreground and 
Background colors to their defaults 
of black and white, then click on the 
Gradient Map icon in the Adjustments 
panel. When the Gradient Map options 
appear in the Properties panel, you 
don't need to make any changes. Now, 
before you can make a quadtone, you 
need to convert this image to Grayscale 
mode by going under the Image menu, 
under Mode, and choosing Grayscale. 
It will ask you if you want to flatten your 
layers, so click the Flatten button. (It will 
also ask you if you want to discard the 
color info. Click Discard.) 

(Continued) 



How to Create Stunning B&W Images 



Chapter 6 



165 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Three: 

Once your photo is in Grayscale mode, 
the Duotone menu item (which has been 
grayed out and unchoosable until now) is 
now open for business (if you're in 8-bit 
mode). So, go under the Image menu, 
under Mode, and choose Duotone. When 
the Duotone Options dialog appears 
(shown here), the default setting is for 
a one-color Monotone (a cruel joke 
perpetrated by Adobe engineers), but 
that's no big deal, because we're going 
to use the built-in presets from the pop- 
up menu at the top. Here, you'll literally 
find 137 presets (I counted). Now, you'd 
think they'd be organized by duotones 
first, tritones, then quadtones, right? 
Nope — that makes too much sense (in 
fact, I'm not sure they're in any order 
at all). 



Step Four: 

I thought I'd give you a few of my favorites 
to get you started. One I use often is 
named "Bl 541 513 5773" (the Bl stands 
for black, and the three sets of numbers 
are the PMS numbers of the three other 
Pantone colors used to make the quad- 
tone). How about a nice duotone? It uses 
black and it adds a reddish brown to the 
mix. It's called "478 brown (100%) bl 4," 
and depending on the photo, it can work 
really well (you'll be surprised at how dif- 
ferent these same quadtones, tritones, 
and duotones will look when applied to 
different photos). There's a nice tritone 
that uses black and two grays, named 
"Bl WmGray 7 WmGray 2." We'll wrap 
things up with another nice duotone — 
this one's named "Warm Gray 11 bl 2," 
and gives you the duotone effect shown 
here. Well, there you have it — four of my 
favorites (and don't forget, when you're 
done, convert back to RGB mode for 
color inkjet printing). 



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Warm Cray 11 bl 4 
Warm Gray S bl 1 
Warm Cray S bl 2 
Warm Cray 8 bl 3 
Warm Cray 8 bl 4 
yellow bl 1 
yellow bl 2 
yellow bl 3 
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► 166 



Chapter 6 



How to Create Stunning B&W Images 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



: 



Now that we created split tones and duotones, this is the perfect time to start 

making your own one-click presets. That way, the next time you open a photo that 

you want to have that same effect, you don't have to go through all those steps 

(converting it to black and white, tweaking it, then applying the Split Toning settings), 

you can just click one button and all those settings are applied at once, giving you 

an instant one-click effect anytime. Of course, these presets aren't just for split tones 

and duotones — make one anytime you want to reuse any settings from Camera Raw. 



Creating Your Own 
One-Click Presets 
in Camera Raw 



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Step One: 

Since we just created that duotone effect 
in Camera Raw, we'll go ahead and use 
that to create a one-click preset there. 
Just remember — anytime you come up 
with a look you like, you can save it as 
a preset. To create a preset, you click on 
the Presets icon (it's the second icon from 
the right at the top of the Panel area), and 
then click on the New Preset icon (shown 
circled here in red) to bring up the New 
Preset dialog (seen here). Now, just turn 
on the checkboxes for the adjustments 
you want copied to your preset (as I did 
here), give your preset a name, and then 
click the OK button. 



Step Two: 

Once you've saved the preset, it appears 
in the Presets list (since there's only 
one preset here, I'm not sure it qualifies 
as a list at this point, but you get the idea, 
right?). To apply it is really a one-click 
process — just open a different photo, 
go to the Presets panel, and click on the 
preset (as shown here), and all those set- 
tings are applied. Keep in mind, though, 
because the exposure is different for 
every photo, if you save a preset where 
you had to tweak the exposure a lot, that 
same exposure will be applied anytime 
you apply this preset. That's why you 
might want to save just the split-tone/ 
duotone settings and not all the expo- 
sure stuff, too. 



How to Create Stunning B&W Images 



Chapter 6 



167 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



If You're Really, 

Really Serious About 

B&W, Then Consider 

This Instead 



I saved this for the last page, because I wanted to share all my favorite techniques 
for doing B&W using just Photoshop's tools, and although I still use those techniques 
from time to time, it would be pretty disingenuous of me if I didn't tell you what I do 
most of the time, which is: I use Nik Software's Silver Efex Pro 2 black-and-white plug- 
in. Almost all the pros I know use it as well, and it's absolutely brilliant (and super-easy 
to use). You can download the free 15-day trial copy from www.niksoftware.com and 
see for yourself. Here's how I use it: 



Step One: 

Once you install Silver Efex Pro 2, open 
the image you want to convert from color 
to B&W, then go under Photoshop's Filter 
menu, under Nik Software, and choose 
Silver Efex Pro 2. When the window 
opens, it gives you the default conversion 
(which isn't bad all by itself), and a host of 
controls on the right side (but honestly, 
I literally never touch those controls). 



Step Two: 

The magic of this plug-in is its B&W (and 
duotone) presets. They're listed along the 
left side of the window, complete with a 
small preview of how the effect will look, 
but here's where I always start: on their 
High Structure preset. Eight times out 
of 10, that's the one I choose, because 
it has its own high-contrast, sharpened 
look that is wonderful for so many images. 
However, if I'm converting a portrait, I'll 
often wind up using a different preset, be- 
cause High Structure can be too intense 
when your subject is a person. So, I click 
on the top preset in the list, and then click 
on each preset below it until I find one 
that looks good to me, then I click OK in 
the bottom-right corner and I'm done. 
That's all I do. It's fast, easy, and it looks 
fantastic. That's just what I want. 



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► 168 



Chapter 6 



How to Create Stunning B&W Images 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



= 



Photoshop Killer Tips 



Why the Fill Dialog Shows Up 
Sometimes, but Not Others 

If you have a flattened image (so, it's just 
a Background layer), and you make a selec- 
tion and press the Delete (PC: Backspace) 
key, the Fill dialog appears (Content- 
Aware is selected in the Use pop-up menu, 
by default). But there are times when hit- 
ting Delete won't bring up the Fill dialog. 
Instead, if you have a multi-layered docu- 
ment, it will delete whatever is inside the 
selection on your current layer, making 
it transparent. (That's either, "Yikes!" or 
"Great!" depending on how you look at it.) 
Also, if you have only one single layer (that 
is not a Background layer), you'll again 
delete anything inside your selection and 
make it transparent. So, to bring up the Fill 
dialog in those instances, just use Shift- 
Delete (PC: Shift-Backspace) instead. 





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Doing a Smooth Zoom In 

Another way to zoom in on your image 
is to click-and-hold the Zoom tool (the 
magnifying glass icon) on the spot where 
you want to zoom, and it smoothly zooms 
in right on that spot. The only downside 
is that it does it so smoothly, it's actually 
slow. It does look cool, but again, it's slow. 
That's why clicking with the tool and drag- 
ging to the right works so much better 
(although it's not nearly as cool to show 
to your friends as the "slow zoom"). 



Move an Object Between 
Documents and Have It Appear 
in the Exact Same Place 



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If you have something on a layer in one 
document, and you want the object to 
appear in the exact same place in another 
open document, here's what you do: First, 
press-and-hold the Command (PC: Ctrl) 
key, go to the Layers panel and click on the 
layer's thumbnail to put a selection around 
your object. Then, press Command-C (PC: 
Ctrl-C) to Copy that object into memory. 
Switch to the other document, then go 
under the Edit menu, under Paste Special, 
and choose Paste in Place. Now it will 
appear in the exact same position in the 
other document (provided, of course, the 
other document is the same size and 
resolution). This also works with selected 
areas — not just layers. 

Removing Red Eye 

If you have a photo that has someone 
with the dreaded red-eye problem, it's 
a 15-second fix. Use the Zoom tool (Z) 
to zoom in tight on the eye, then get the 
Red Eye tool from the Toolbox (it's under 
the Spot Healing Brush, or press Shift-J 
until you have it). Click it once on the 
red area of the eye, and in just a second 
or two, the red is gone. If your first try 
doesn't select all the red, increase the 



Pupil Size up in the Options Bar. If the 
retouch doesn't look dark enough (the 
pupil looks gray, rather than black), just 
increase the Darken Amount up in the 
Options Bar. 



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Dragged-and-Dropped 
Images Don't Have to 
Appear as Smart Objects 

You learned earlier that you can drag- 
and-drop images from Mini Bridge right 
into open documents (and if there isn't 
a document open, it'll open as a new 
document), but by default it always drags 
in as a smart object. If you'd rather it 
didn't, press Command-K (PC: Ctrl-K) 
to bring up Photoshop's Preferences, 
click on General on the left, then turn off 
the checkbox for Place or Drag Raster 
Images as Smart Objects near the bottom 
of the Options section. 



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How to Create Stunning B&W Images 



Chapter 6 



169 < 




Photo by Scott Kelby Exposure: 1/25 sec 



Aperture Value: //2.8 



Chapter 7 Creating HDR I 




WeAreHDR 

creating HDR images 

Tell me this isn't the perfect name for a chapter on HDR. 
The band is named hdr, their album is called We Are Hdr, 
and there's a song on the album called, "We Are HDR." 
This was destiny, my friends. Now, I have to admit, I have 
no idea if the HDR they are referring to actually stands for 
the type of HDR (High Dynamic Range) imaging we're talking 
about in this chapter, but on some level, I like to think it does 
(although it probably stands for something more like "Heavy 
Donut Raid" or "Her Darn Rottweiler" or maybe "Hi, Don 
Rickles"). Anyway, if there's a topic that gets photographers 
really riled up, it's HDR (Highly Decaffeinated Roast), so 
I don't really want to take us down that rabbit hole. Now, as 
you'll learn, there are two types of HDR (Hardee's Delicious 
Ribs): The good one, where you expand the dynamic range 
of the photo, getting a greater range of tone and light than 
today's digital cameras can create, which gives you an image 



that's closer to what the human eye captures. And the 
evil HDR (House Developers' Revolt), which makes your 
images look like a movie still from a Harry Potter movie. 
Now, I know as you read this, you're thinking, "Oh, I would 
want that first thing" and at this point, I totally believe that's 
what you think you want. But here's the thing: there's one 
slider in Photoshop CS6's Merge to HDR Pro feature that 
lets you go from real to surreal pretty much by just sliding it 
one way or the other. And I know that, at some point, when 
nobody's looking, you're going to drag toward the fantasy 
side, and then — bam! — you're hooked, and before long, 
you're tone mapping everything from your wedding photos 
to baby photos, and you're friends and family will sit you 
down and try to help wean you off the "hard stuff," but the 
lure of surreal HDR (Hallucinogenic Deli Relish) is just too 
strong. Don't say I didn't warn you. 



171 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Setting Up 

Your Camera 

to Shoot HDR 



For the HDR (High Dynamic Range) technique to work, you have to "shoot for HDR" 
(in other words, you have to set up your camera to shoot exposure-bracketed shots 
that can be used by Photoshop to create an HDR image). Here, I'm going to show 
you how to set up both Nikon and Canon cameras (the two most popular DSLR 
brands) to shoot three- and five-stop brackets, so all you have to do is hold the 
shutter button and your camera will do the rest. 



Step One: 

When you're shooting for HDR, you're 
going to be shooting multiple shots of 
the exact same scene (at different expo- 
sures), and since these images need to 
be perfectly aligned with one another, 
you really need to be shooting on a tripod. 
Now, that being said, Photoshop does 
have an Auto-Align feature that does an 
amazingly good job, so if you don't have 
a tripod, or you're in a situation where you 
can't use one, you can try hand-holding — 
just make sure you're shooting in a well-lit 
area, so your shutter speed will be fast 
enough that your images won't be blurry. 



Step Two: 

We'll need to vary our exposure as we 
take each HDR shot, but we can't vary 
the f-stop or our depth of field will change 
from shot to shot, so instead we vary our 
shutter speed (actually, the camera will 
do this for us). So, switch your camera to 
Aperture Priority mode (the A mode on 
Nikon cameras, like a D300S, D700, D3S, 
D3X, and D4, and the Av mode on Canon 
cameras like the 60D, 60Da, 7D, 5D Mark 
III, 1D Mark IV, etc.). In Aperture Priority 
mode, we choose an aperture (like f/8 or 
f/11 for outdoor shots), and then the 
camera will vary the shutter speed for us. 








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► 172 Chapter 7 Creating HDR Images 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 
















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Step Three: 

Go ahead and compose your shot, 
and focus on the scene you want to 
shoot. Once it's in focus, switch your 
lens to Manual focus. That way, while 
your camera is taking multiple shots, it 
doesn't accidentally change focus. Now, 
just so we're clear, you're not going to 
manually focus — you're going to use 
Auto focus just like always, but once 
it's focused on your scene, just switch 
off Auto focus, and then don't touch 
the lens. 



Step Four: 

Now we set up the camera to shoot 
bracketed, which tells the camera to 
shoot the regular exposure, and then 
extra photos that are exposed both 
brighter and darker. The minimum 
number of exposures you can use for 
HDR is three, but I generally take five 
bracketed photos for my HDR images 
(although some folks take as many as 
nine). So, with five, I wind up with one 
shot with my normal exposure, then two 
darker shots (one 1 stop underexposed 
and one 2 stops underexposed), fol- 
lowed by two brighter ones (one 1 stop 
overexposed and one 2 stops over- 
exposed). Here's how to set up your 
camera to shoot bracketed (we'll start 
with a Nikon D3S, for example): To turn 
on bracketing on a Nikon D3S, press 
the Fn (function) button on the front of 
the camera, below the lens. Then use 
the main command dial to choose how 
many exposures to bracket (the control 
panel on the top of the camera shows 
the bracketing settings; choose 5F, so 
you get five bracketed shots). Use the 
sub-command dial (in front of the shutter 
button) to set the bracketing amount to 
1 stop (as seen here). 

(Continued) 



Creating HDR Images Chapter 7 1 73 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

Now, switch your Nikon camera to 
Continuous High shooting mode, and 
just press-and-hold the shutter button 
until it takes all five bracketed shots for 
you. That's it. Okay, on to the setup for 
Canon cameras. 

TIP: Use a Low ISO 

Because HDR shots are likely to increase 
any noise in your image, try to shoot your 
HDR shots using the lowest ISO you can 
get away with (100 ISO on most Canon 
cameras, or 200 ISO on Nikon DSLRs). 



Step Six: 

To turn on bracketing for a Canon camera 
(like the Canon 60D), start by going to the 
Camera Tab menu in the LCD on the back 
of the camera, then scroll down to Expo 
Comp/AEB (Auto Exposure Bracketing), 
and press the Set button. Now, use the 
Main Dial to choose 2 stops brighter, then 
press the Set button again (this automati- 
cally sets the bracketing to also shoot 
2 stops darker). Now set your camera to 
High-Speed Continuous Shooting mode, 
and then press-and-hold the shutter but- 
ton and your camera will automatically 
shoot all five bracketed photos (once all 
five are taken, you can release the shutter 
button). That's all there is to it. 

Note: Because I shoot with a Nikon 
camera, and most Nikon models only 
bracket in 1-stop increments, I have to 
shoot five bracketed images to have 
one that's 2 stops underexposed and 
one that's 2 stops overexposed. How- 
ever, Canon DSLRs (and some Nikons, 
like the D4 and D7000) bracket in 2-stop 
increments, so you'll only need to shoot 
three bracketed images. They contain 
enough depth to make the HDR (actually, 
the darker image is more important than 
the lighter one), and by only using three 
photos, the processing is much faster. 



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► 1 74 Chapter 7 Creating HDR Images 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



In the next project, I'm going to go through what all the sliders in 

Photoshop's built-in HDR feature do, but for now we're going to start off with a 

quick, "down & dirty" HDR crash course that will have your HDR image compiled, 

tone mapped, sharpened, and finished off in just about six clicks (great for people 

with attention spans like mine, who want it done now without a lot of fuss). I use this 

exact HDR workflow a lot and thanks to something they included in Photoshop CS6, 

we can just dive right in and do it (you couldn't do this without some serious 

prep work back in CS5 — you'll see why in a moment). Hang on — here we go! 



Scott's "Down & Dirty" 
HDR Workflow 
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Step One: 

If you shot for HDR (like I talked about in 
the previous tutorial), you can easily take 
those images straight from Mini Bridge 
to Photoshop's Merge to HDR Pro feature. 
Here, I've selected the five shots I brack- 
eted with my camera (one that's 2 stops 
underexposed, one that's 1 stop under- 
exposed, the normal exposure, one that's 

1 stop overexposed, and one that's 

2 stops overexposed). Once you've 
selected your bracketed shots in Mini 
Bridge, Right-click on any one of those 
thumbnails and from the pop-up menu 
that appears, under Photoshop, choose 
Merge to HDR Pro (as shown here). 



Step Two: 

In a few moments, the Merge to HDR 
Pro dialog will appear (I'm being pretty 
gratuitous when I say "a few moments," 
because I just timed it and, on my laptop, 
it took 22 seconds before the dialog 
appeared. For everything else in life, 
that's a very short time, but when you're 
waiting for a dialog to open, it feels more 
like 3V2 hours). Anyway, it merges these 
five images, with five different exposures, 
into one single HDR image that looks 
pretty bad, because it's using the default 
settings, which should be named simply 
"Bad" for the sake of clarity. 

(Continued) 



Creating HDR Images Chapter 7 1 75 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Three: 

When Merge to HDR Pro came out, 
I made a lot of fun of the presets that 
came with it, because I couldn't find a sin- 
gle image that they didn't look awful on 
(none of them looked like the traditional 
tone-mapped HDR images you see all 
over the web). So, I set out to create an 
HDR Pro preset that worked pretty con- 
sistently for most of the images I tried 
it on. It took a while, but I came up with 
one, and I'm totally jazzed to say that 
Adobe liked it enough that they includ- 
ed it here, in Photoshop CS6. It's called 
"Scott5" (it was my fifth try, and it took 
a lot longer than it sounds). So, since 
Adobe included it in their Preset menu, 
all you have to do for this "Down & Dirty 
HDR" technique is choose Scott5 from 
the pop-up menu (as shown here. My 
buddy RC Concepcion had a couple of 
his presets included here, as well. They're 
called "RC5" and "City Twilight"). 



Step Four: 

With this preset, there's really only 
one slider that I ever need to tweak and, 
depending on the photo, it might not 
even make a difference, but it's worth 
a try. It's the Shadow slider. If part of your 
HDR image looks pretty dark (like the 
courtyard in the center does back in Step 
Three), then you can open up those shad- 
ows a bit by dragging the Shadow slider 
way over to the right (as seen here). Now, 
you can see the trees in the courtyard 
pretty well. Click OK to process the 
image (it's waiting time again). 

TIP: Presets Can Look 
Very Different 

The Scott5 preset looks pretty good most 
of the time, but I do find some images 
where it doesn't look good and, in those 
cases, I try out the other presets to see if 
one gives me a better look. If they don't, 
then turn to page 179. 





► 176 Chapter 7 Creating HDR Images 



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for Digital Photographers 



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Step Five: 

Once the image opens in Photoshop 
(as seen here), it's time to add some 
sharpening. High Pass sharpening is re- 
ally popular on HDR images (rather than 
Unsharp Mask), because it's kind of a 
mega-sharpening and really enhances 
the details that are already there (and 
I think its look really suits HDR images). 
Start by duplicating the Background layer 
(press Command-J [PC: Ctrl-J]), then go 
under the Filter menu, under Other, and 
choose High Pass. When the High Pass 
filter dialog appears (shown here), I gener- 
ally enter 4 pixels and click OK for a nice 
snappy sharpening. {Note: When the filter 
dialog appears, it will turn your duplicate 
layer solid gray with just an outline of the 
edges in your image. That's normal.) Now, 
to change this gray layer into sharpening, 
go to the Layers panel, change this layer's 
blend mode from Normal to Overlay (as 
I did here), and now you see the sharpen- 
ing. If you think it's too much, just lower 
the Opacity of this layer until it looks 
right to you. 



Step Six: 

Another popular HDR "finishing move" 
is to add a soft glow over the entire 
image. It helps to take away some of the 
harshness of an HDR image and gives 
the image a little bit of a surreal feel to 
it (in a good way, not in an over-the-top, 
crazy surreal HDR way that drives people 
nuts). First, choose Flatten Image from 
the Layers panel's flyout menu to flatten 
your layers, duplicate your Background 
layer again, then go under the Filter menu, 
under Blur, and choose Gaussian Blur. 
Enter 50 pixels to blur the heck out of it, 
and click OK (as shown here). Don't worry, 
you're not done yet. 



(Continued) 



Creating HDR Images Chapter 7 1 77 ^ 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Seven: 

Now, to finish this puppy off, lower the 
Opacity of this blurry layer to 70% (as 
shown here) and then (this is really impor- 
tant) change the layer blend mode from 
Normal to Soft Light (as seen here). This 
is what blends the glow effect in nicely 
and gives you the final effect you see at 
the bottom right. 





The HDR image after applying the "Down & Dirty HDR" technique, along with 
sharpening and the glow finishing move 



► 178 Chapter 7 Creating HDR Images 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



Okay, now that you've learned my "Down & Dirty" method, you probably want to 

branch out a little further and get a feel for what all the sliders and controls in HDR 

Pro actually do. Here, I'll take you through HDR Pro from start to finish and then you 

can start to develop some of your own presets with the looks that you want to get. 



Working with 
HDR Pro in 
Photoshop CS6 





Step One: 

Go to Mini Bridge (or Big Bridge), press- 
and-hold the Command (PC: Ctrl) key, and 
click on the images you want to combine 
into a single HDR image. Once they're 
selected, Right-click on any one of those 
thumbnails and, from the pop-up menu 
that appears, under Photoshop, choose 
Merge to HDR Pro (as shown here). 



Step Two: 

After a few moments, you'll see the Merge 
to HDR Pro dialog appear (seen here) with 
the default settings applied, but they are 
so subtle (and lame) you may not notice 
that anything's been done to your image 
at all. At the bottom of the dialog, you'll 
see thumbnails of the images it com- 
bined to create the single HDR exposure, 
and it shows the Exposure Value [EV] of 
each one (so you can see which one is 
the normal exposure and which are the 
over- or underexposed ones. These actu- 
ally come into play if you turn on the Auto 
Ghosting feature — more on that later 
in the chapter). Near the top right of the 
dialog, you'll see a pop-up menu that 
says Local Adaptation, and that's the 
only option you want to use (the others 
are holdovers from the "bad HDR" of CS4 
and earlier. Yecch!). 

(Continued) 



Creating HDR Images Chapter 7 1 79 i 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Three: 

As I mentioned in the previous (Down 
& Dirty) HDR project, there's a Preset 
pop-up menu at the top right of the 
dialog, and you might be tempted to 
choose one of those presets, until you 
actually try a few (well, I'm kind of partial 
to Scott5, but outside of that one, and 
maybe City Twilight or RC5, my guess is 
that'll be the last time you try 'em. Yes, 
they're that bad). Anyway, ignore those 
for now, and just know that, instead, a lot 
of your editing work will be spent find- 
ing a good balance between the two 
Edge Glow sliders. The Radius slider 
controls the size of the edge glow, and 
the Strength slider controls the contrast 
of that glow. Move these two sliders in 
small increments and you'll stay out of 
trouble. In my Scott5 preset, I set the 
Radius at 176 and the Strength at 0.47 
(as shown here). 



Step Four: 

A new feature in Photoshop CS6 is Edge 
Smoothness (at the bottom of the Edge 
Glow section) and it's well named — when 
you turn it on, it kind of smooths out the 
edges a bit, but at the same time, it also 
enhances the detail. If you turn it on at 
this stage of the game (when you've only 
tweaked the Radius and Strength sliders), 
it's not going to look like it's doing much 
of anything (and right now, it's not), but 
once we juice this baby up and turn it on, 
then I think you'll really like it (but as with 
any slider, it doesn't look good on every 
image, so you'll just have to try it and see). 
For now, let's keep it turned off, and once 
we crank things up, we'll come back and 
turn it on, and you'll get a better look at 
what it really does. 





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► 1 80 Chapter 7 Creating HDR Images 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 





Step Five: 

The next section down is Tone and 
Detail, and we'll start with the Gamma 
slider. If your overall exposure looks 
pretty decent, you probably won't 
have to mess with the Gamma slider 
much (especially if you're trying to cre- 
ate a photorealistic HDR image, rather 
than the hyper-contrast fantasy look). 
The Gamma slider controls the mid- 
tones, and if you drag the slider in 
either direction, you'll see how it 
affects the image. For this image, 
which is going more in the hyperreal 
direction, set the Gamma to the right 
at 0.76 (as shown here). 



Step Six: 

The Exposure slider controls the over- 
all exposure, much in the same way the 
Exposure slider does in Camera Raw 
(dragging to the left darkens the overall 
image; dragging to the right brightens 
it). In this case, go ahead and drag the 
Exposure to 0.30 to lighten things just 
a little bit. If you look back at Step Three, 
you can see this doesn't look a whole lot 
different yet, but that's about to change. 



(Continued) 



Creating HDR Images Chapter 7 181^ 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Seven: 

The next slider down is the Detail slider, 
which kind of acts like the Clarity slider 
in Camera Raw (it adds something simi- 
lar to midtone contrast). Think of this as 
the "Make it look like HDR" slider, and 
cranking this one way up helps to cre- 
ate the hyperreal artistic look. In this 
case, set the Detail amount at 300% 
(as shown here). It's starting to now get 
that "HDR look." 



Step Eight: 

Now, on to the Advanced tab (I have no 
idea why these are called "Advanced," 
since these sliders live in the Basic panel 
in Camera Raw and do very similar things). 
The top two sliders — Shadow and High- 
light — don't usually have a big effect. 
Dragging the Shadow slider to the right 
makes the shadow detail lighter — kind 
of like Camera Raw's Shadows (but with- 
out as much power). The Highlight slider 
acts like Camera Raw's Highlights slider 
and dragging it to the left pulls back the 
very brightest highlight areas, but again, 
it doesn't have nearly as much effect 
as Camera Raw's Highlights slider. Here, 
go ahead and set the Shadow amount at 
100%, which brightens up the shadow 
areas inside the arches, and lower the 
Highlight amount to -30%, which re- 
duces some of the really bright lights in 
the stone floor. Now, keep in mind that 
these are two sliders that will change 
some from image to image. Most of the 
time, I wind up lowering the Highlight 
amount either a little or a lot (depending 
on the image), and raising the Shadow 
amount to keep the shadows from getting 
too dark. But, again, it just depends on 
the image. 





► 1 82 Chapter 7 Creating HDR Images 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 




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Click to add a point 
to the center 



Add a point halfway from Add a point halfway from the 

the center to the top, then center to the bottom, then 

click-and-drag upward click-and-drag downward 



Step Nine: 

The next two sliders down, Vibrance and 
Saturation, are also in Camera Raw, but 
again, the versions here in HDR Pro don't 
have nearly as much power. Basically, 
these make the colors more punchy, so 
if your image needs more color, try drag- 
ging the Vibrance slider to the right. If you 
want to take your image to "Harry Potter 
land," then boost the Saturation amount, 
as well. Here, we'll set the Vibrance at 
60% and set the Saturation at 0%. Be 
careful about adding too much Vibrance 
or Saturation at this point, because in 
the next step, when we add contrast, 
that usually makes the colors automati- 
cally more vibrant. 



Step 10: 

Lastly, there is no Contrast slider here 
in HDR Pro, so click on the Curve tab 
to reveal a point curve like the one in 
Camera Raw. You see that diagonal line 
going across the curve grid? Well, we 
bend that line into a subtle S-curve and 
that adds contrast. The steeper we make 
this S-curve, the more contrast it adds. 
So, start by clicking once in the center 
of the line and it adds an adjustment 
point there (see bottom left). Now, add 
another point halfway between that cen- 
ter point and the top right, then click- 
and-drag it upward a bit (as seen in the 
bottom center). Now, add another point 
halfway between the center and the bot- 
tom-left corner, click-and-drag it down- 
ward a bit (as seen in the bottom right), 
and there's your contrast. Remember, if 
you need more contrast, click-and-drag 
the top point up higher and the bot- 
tom point down lower, which makes the 
curve steeper. 



(Continued) 



Creating HDR Images Chapter 7 1 83 ^ 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step 11: 

Okay, now we can go back and turn on 
the Edge Smoothness checkbox. You'll 
see the image soften a bit, but at the 
same time, you'll see more detail come 
out (which is great for this type of look). 
Remember back in Step Four when we 
turned it on, we really didn't see much 
of anything? Well, toggle it on/off a few 
times and you'll see that it now really 
adds a lot. By the way, in the previous 
step, when we increased the contrast, 
it made the highlights a little too bright, 
so I went back to the Highlight slider 
and pulled them back to -80, since the 
stone floor was starting to blow out in 
some areas. Note: At this point, you 
could save this as an HDR Pro preset 
(click on the icon to the right of the 
Preset pop-up menu and choose Save 
Preset to add it to the list). 



Step 12: 

Now, click the OK button at the bottom 
right to have Photoshop process the 
image. When it's done, the HDR image 
appears in Photoshop (as seen here). 
There's something many people don't re- 
alize about the post-production process 
of HDR images: there's always a second 
round of processing in Camera Raw. How 
do you get your image back into Camera 
Raw? First, you have to save it as a TIFF, 
PSD, or JPEG (if you want to keep it in 
16-bit mode, save it as a TIFF or PSD), so 
choose Save As from the File menu (as 
shown here), give your image a name, 
click Save, and then close the image. 
Next, under the File menu, choose Open 
(PC: Open As). When the dialog appears, 
click on the image you just saved, and 
from the Format (PC: Open As) pop-up 
menu at the bottom, choose Camera 
Raw (as shown here) to have the image 
open in Camera Raw for processing, 
and then click Open. 




Photoshop 



Edit linage Layer Type Select Fil 




► 184 Chapter 7 Creating HDR Images 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 





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Step 13: 

The image looks a little bit dark over- 
all, so increase the Exposure to +0.95. 
Okay, the image looks brighter, but it 
also looks kinda flat, so this is where you 
want to bump up the Contrast. Here, I 
bumped it up to +70. The light outside 
looks like it's blowing out and we need 
to recover as much of that as we can, so 
drag the Highlights slider all the way to 
the left to -100. To open up the shadow 
areas in the ceiling, we're going to bump 
up the Shadows to +60. That brings in a 
lot more detail, too. We still have a prob- 
lem with the bright light, so we're going 
to have to lower the Whites. There's such 
a broad contrast between the dark ceil- 
ings and the bright light streaming in that 
we need to lower them to -50. And, to 
keep the image from looking washed out, 
we need to lower the Blacks. Anytime I 
see an image looking washed out, the 
first thing I think of is I need to lower 
the Blacks, so drag that slider to the left 
to -50. Of course, since an image like 
this has so much texture, it's perfect for 
Clarity, which enhances the texture, so 
increase the Clarity to +53. And to bring 
out the color, we're going to increase just 
the Vibrance to +23, which gives us the 
nice, vibrant look that we see here. 



Step 14: 

The last finishing move for this would be 
to darken the edges all the way around, 
so the focus isn't on the outside of the 
photo, but kind of leads your eye to the 
center. To do this, click on the Effects 
icon (the fourth one from the right) at 
the top of the Panel area, and go under 
Post Crop Vignetting. Make sure your 
Style is set to Highlight Priority, which 
is the default, because it's the best look- 
ing one, and then lower the Amount to 
-20. That's really all we're going to have 
to do — just lower the Amount to -20 
and we're looking pretty good. 

(Continued) 



Creating HDR Images Chapter 7 1 85 ^ 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step 15: 

Click the Open Image button to re-open 
the image in Photoshop. At this point, 
I generally add two finishing moves (the 
same two I did in the Down & Dirty HDR 
project before this one): (1) I add High 
Pass sharpening (you can look back at 
the Down & Dirty project, or just check 
out page 189 to see how to add this), 
and (2) I add a soft overall glow by du- 
plicating the Background layer, then 
adding a 50-pixel Gaussian Blur (that's 
based on a 12-megapixel camera file. 
If you're shooting a higher megapixel 
camera, you might have to use 60 or 70 
pixels of blur), then lower the Opacity of 
this layer to 60%, and lastly change the 
blend mode of this blurry layer to Soft 
Light (as shown here) to create the glow 
effect (you can find more on exactly how 
to do this in the Down & Dirty project). 
A before and after is shown below. 





The original normal-exposure image 



The HDR image after being processed with HDR Pro, along with edge 
vignetting, sharpening, and the glow finishing move 



► 186 Chapter 7 Creating HDR Images 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



In the previous projects, we looked at the very popular, hyperreal 

tone-mapped look, which is definitely a creative, artistic use of HDR, but if 

you're looking to simply expand the dynamic range of what your digital camera 

can capture, without adding an "HDR look" to it, you'll be happy to know 

that getting that look is even easier (though I recommend going through the 

previous projects first, so you know what all the sliders do, because here 

I'm just going to give you a recipe for photorealistic HDR images). 



Creating 
Photorealistic 
HDR Images 




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Step One: 

Start by selecting your HDR-bracketed 
images in Mini Bridge, then Right-click on 
any one of those thumbnails and, under 
Photoshop, choose Merge to HDR Pro. 
After a few moments, you'll see the Merge 
to HDR Pro dialog appear (seen here). Go 
ahead and choose Photorealistic from 
the Preset pop-up menu at the top right, 
and you'll find out (like I did) that the 
Photorealistic preset doesn't look so 
photorealistic sometimes. It actually looks 
like it has an effect applied. In fact, if you 
look at the side of this building, you can 
see an edge glow around it. Nothing 
screams HDR like an edge glow. 



Step Two: 

Surprisingly, the one that looks the most 
photorealistic to me is the preset called 
Default. So, choose Default from the Pre- 
set pop-up menu, and take a look at the 
image. The edge glow is gone, and look 
at, for example, the grass, trees, and left 
side of the building. You can now easily 
see there is a bird on the lawn, and you 
can see detail in the two trees on the left 
and in the left side of the building — things 
that were completely lost in the original 
exposure, as you'll see on the next page. 



(Continued) 



Creating HDR Images Chapter 7 1 87 ^ 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Three: 

If you hand-held the shots, you may want 
to turn on the Remove Ghosts checkbox 
just to see if that makes a difference (it 
doesn't make a big difference in this one). 
You also might want to add a little bit of 
contrast using an S-curve, as shown here 
(see page 183 in this chapter for more on 
this). Below is a before and after, compar- 
ing the normal-exposure image and the 
HDR image. Again, notice how the HDR 
image reveals so much more in the details, 
and in the texture of the building, without 
it getting clogged up and turning to black 
in areas. You have detail in areas you 
wouldn't normally have it. 




{. 'C-nftri J 




The HDR image using the Default preset settings 
and then adding an S-curve 



► 1 88 Chapter 7 Creating HDR Images 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



Although I cover High Pass sharpening in the sharpening chapter, and in a few of the 
other projects in this chapter, I thought it was important to include it here as its own 
project, because High Pass sharpening has kind of become synonymous with HDR 
editing. High Pass sharpening is sometimes called "extreme sharpening" and that's a 
really good description of what it is. Here, I'm going to show you how to apply it, 
how to control it afterward, and an optional method that I use myself quite a bit. 



High Pass 
Sharpening for 
HDR Images 



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Step One: 

Once you've finished creating your 
HDR image using Merge to HDR Pro, 
and it's open in Photoshop, start by 
pressing Command-J (PC: Ctrl-J) to 
duplicate the Background layer. Now 
go under the Filter menu, under Other, 
and choose High Pass (as shown here). 



(Continued) 



Creating HDR Images Chapter 7 1 89 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Two: 

When the High Pass filter dialog appears, 
drag the Radius slider all the way to the 
left, so that everything turns solid gray. 
Now, drag the slider to the right until 
you can just start to see the color peek 
through the solid gray (as shown here) — 
the farther you drag, the more intense 
the effect will be (here, as an example, 
I dragged to 7 pixels, and you can see 
lots of edge detail starting to appear). 
When you're done, click OK. 



Step Three: 

To bring the sharpening into the image, 
go to the top of the Layers panel and 
change the duplicate layer's blend mode 
from Normal to one of these three modes: 
(1) for medium sharpening, choose Soft 
Light; (2) for heavy sharpening, choose 
Overlay; or (3) for just insane sharpening, 
choose Hard Light (as shown here). If the 
sharpening seems like it's too much, you 
can lower the opacity of this duplicate 
layer. Think of this as the control for the 
amount of sharpening, so try lowering the 
Opacity amount (at the top of the Layers 
panel) to 75% (for 75% of the sharpening), 
or 50% if that's still too much. So, that's 
High Pass sharpening, but there's another 
option, and in the next step, we'll look at 
limiting where the sharpening is applied 
(and keeping some of the glow around 
the edges in check). 



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Step Four: 

If you just need this level of intense sharp- 
ening over particular areas of your photo 
(like in this case, maybe over the gold tops 
of the columns and over the artwork), just 
press-and-hold the Option (PC: Alt) key 
and click on the Add Layer Mask icon at 
the bottom of the Layers panel (shown 
circled here) to hide your sharpened layer 
behind a black mask. Get the Brush tool 
(B), and make sure your Foreground color 
is set to white. Then from the Brush Picker 
in the Options Bar, choose a medium- 
sized, soft-edged brush and paint over 
just the parts of the image you want to 
be super-sharp (here, I've painted over 
the gold tops of the columns, the chande- 
liers, the paintings, and tiles). Once you've 
painted over those areas, also try the 
Overlay and Soft Light blend modes to 
see which of the three you like best. 




After 



Creating HDR Images Chapter 7 1 91< 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Getting the 

HDR Look on a 

Single Image 



You could actually get kinda close to an HDR look with a single image back in 
Photoshop CS5, but now in Photoshop CS6, with its new Camera Raw controls, 
and especially the enhancements and expanded power of Clarity, you can really 
get incredibly close to an HDR look using just one photo (instead of combining 
a number of bracketed photos). Here's the recipe to make it happen: 



Step One: 

Here's the original single-image exposure, 
and it's the perfect kind of image to apply 
an HDR look to. There's a wide tonal gap 
between the bright light coming in from 
the windows and the dark shadows in the 
rest of the image; plus, things with lots 
of texture and detail tend to look great 
as HDR images, and if they look great as 
HDR, they'll look great with an HDR ef- 
fect applied, even though we're applying 
it to one single image, rather than a set of 
bracketed exposures in HDR Pro. Start by 
opening the image in Camera Raw. Here's 
the basic recipe we follow: crank up the 
Shadows, crush down the Highlights, add 
lots of Blacks, max out the Clarity, add a 
dark edge vignette, and then add some 
sharpening. Okay, let's try it. 



Step Two: 

Drag the Highlights slider all the way to 
the left. Then, drag the Shadows slider 
all the way to the right, which tends to 
make the image look washed out. So, 
then drag the Blacks slider way to the 
left, until the photo doesn't look washed 
out anymore. Now, increase the Clarity 
to +100, and if the photo needs a little 
boost in color (I sure think this one does), 
crank up the Vibrance slider a bit (here I 
dragged it to +25). This particular image 
looks pretty dark overall, so I increased 
the Exposure to +1.40 (as shown here), 
but you won't always have to do that. 



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Step Three: 

Next, let's darken the edges of the image 
(very popular with real HDR images) by 
clicking on the Effects icon (the fourth 
icon from the right) at the top of the Panel 
area and, in the Post Crop Vignetting sec- 
tion, dragging the Amount slider to the 
left until the edges look nice and dark 
(here, I dragged over to -13). 



Step Four: 

Now, we're going to apply a soft glow to 
the image (again, another typical effect 
you'd apply to a real HDR image), and 
we can do it right here in Camera Raw. 
Click on the Adjustment Brush (K) in the 
toolbar up top, and then click three times 
on the little - (minus sign) button to the 
left of Clarity. This resets all the other 
sliders to 0, and then sets the Clarity to 
a negative amount (-75), which creates a 
softening effect. Turn off the Auto Mask 
checkbox near the bottom of the panel 
(to speed up your painting) and paint 
over the entire image using this negative 
Clarity setting, giving you a similar effect 
to a soft glow you'd apply in Photoshop 
as a finishing move. 



(Continued) 



Creating HDR Images Chapter 7 1 93 ^ 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

The final step here is to jump over to the 
Detail panel (it's the third icon from the 
left) and crank up the Sharpening Amount 
quite a bit (here, I cranked it up to 70), 
which completes the HDR look (a before/ 
after is shown on the next page, along 
with some other images where I used 
Camera Raw to create the HDR look). 
Besides using Camera Raw, there is an 
HDR Toning feature in Photoshop that 
you can apply to a single image, and it 
uses the same presets and underlying 
techniques as HDR Pro. It doesn't do a 
bad job, but honestly I think you can get 
a better HDR look for single images using 
the new Camera Raw, so I just go with 
that. However, you at least should know 
where HDR Toning is and give it a try to 
see what you think. 



Step Six: 

Go under the Image menu, under Ad- 
justments, and choose HDR Toning (of 

course, before you do that, open your 
original image in Photoshop). Here are 
some settings that get you a decent faux- 
HDR look: Set your Edge Glow Radius 
to 100, the Strength to 0.84, and turn on 
Smooth Edges to hide the harsh edge 
lines. In the Tone and Detail section, set 
your Gamma to 0.82 and your Exposure 
to -0.57 to darken the image a bit. Set 
your Detail to +214% to add lots of 
crispness, then set your Shadow slider 
to -100% to darken and hide some of 
the speckled dots that are starting to 
appear in the shadow areas. Crank up 
the Vibrance and Saturation a bit to add 
in some color. Lastly, add an S-Curve 
(see page 183 earlier in this chapter for 
more on this) to add more contrast to 
your image. You'll notice there are some 
funky edge problems along the windows 
and in some other areas, which is another 
reason I prefer Camera Raw. 




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► 194 Chapter 7 Creating HDR Images 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 




The original normal-exposure image 



Using just Camera Raw to create the HDR look 




The original normal-exposure image 



Using just Camera Raw to create the HDR look 




The original normal-exposure image 



Using just Camera Raw to create the HDR look 



Creating HDR Images Chapter 7 1 95 ^ 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Dealing with Ghosting 
in Merge to HDR Pro 



If anything was moving slightly in the scene you were photographing (like water 
in a lake, or tree branches in the wind, or people walking by, etc.), you'll have a 
ghosting problem, where that object is either blurry (at best), or you'll actually 
see a transparent ghost of that part of the image (hence the name). In this hand- 
held photo of the Forbidden City, there are people moving in the scene, but in 
most cases, fixing that is just one click away. 



Step One: 

Open the HDR bracketed images in 
Merge to HDR Pro (see Step One on 
page 175 for more on how to do this). 
Here are some settings you can use for 
this image: Radius: 175, Strength: 0.25, 
Gamma: 0.75, Exposure 0.25, Detail: 
300%, Shadow: -100%, Highlight: -50%, 
Vibrance: 25%, Saturation 25%, then click 
on the Curve tab and create an S-curve 
(see page 183 for more on this). Lastly, 
turn on the Edge Smoothness checkbox 
to enhance the detail and smooth out the 
edges. Now, if you look just right of front 
center, you see the problem: you can't 
keep tourists from moving (well, not with- 
out duct tape). You can see what looks 
like a semi-transparent version of the 
tourist in the foreground (which is why 
it's called ghosting). 

Step Two: 

Luckily, fixing this is pretty darn easy: 
turn on the Remove Ghosts checkbox 
at the top right of the dialog (it's shown 
circled here in red). Merge to HDR Pro 
tries to deal with the ghosting by look- 
ing for things that are in common in all 
your exposures to lock onto and it does 
a pretty amazing job of it. Of course, 
sometimes it makes the wrong guess 
(more likely, if you're creating HDR from 
JPEG images rather than from RAW 
images), and if this happens, you can 
choose which of your bracketed photos 
you think it should lock onto, by clicking 
on its thumbnail in the filmstrip at the 
bottom of the dialog. 





► 196 Chapter 7 Creating HDR Images 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



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Step Three: 

The thumbnail with the green highlight 
around it is the one it chose to lock onto 
for de-ghosting purposes (you'll only see 
this green highlight when the Remove 
Ghosts checkbox is on), and if you look 
back in Step Two, you'll see that it origi- 
nally chose the thumbnail on the far right. 
If you want to try one of the other images, 
and see if using it does a better job than 
the one Photoshop chose, just click on it 
down in the filmstrip. Here, I clicked on 
the first image, but it actually looks worse. 
{Note: If you shot a multi-photo exposure 
of something, like waves rushing to the 
shore, you can actually choose which 
individual wave you want visible using 
this same technique, so it's not just for 
ghosting.) So, at this point, I'd click back 
on the far-right thumbnail. 



Step Four: 

Now, what would you do if the Re- 
move Ghosts checkbox didn't work at 
all? Then, you'd use the trick you'll learn 
in the next project ("Creating a Blended 
HDR"), and you'd paint in the original 
person from the single still image (it 
works really well actually). In this case, 
it worked (yay), so now you would just 
finish this HDR image off just like you 
learned earlier in this chapter — by saving 
it as a TIFF, PSD, or JPEG, then reopen- 
ing it in Camera Raw for the finishing 
moves. In this case, I added an edge 
vignette in the Lens Corrections panel 
(what's an HDR without a huge vignette, 
eh?), and then I used the settings you 
see here in the Basic panel: it's kind of 
underexposed, so increase the Expo- 
sure to +0.80, add some Contrast by 
increasing it to +14, pull back the bright 
highlights by dragging the Highlights 
slider to the left to -53, and open up 
those shadows in the three archways 
by dragging the Shadows slider to +37. 
Lastly, as always, I pumped up the Clar- 
ity (in this case, to +33, as shown here). 



Creating HDR Images Chapter 7 1 97 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Creating a 
Blended HDR 



We've all seen HDR images where parts of the image look funky, with big glows 
around the edges of things and dark or black skies that look obviously "HDR'd," 
plants and trees that look plastic, and lots of weird-looking areas that instantly tip 
you off that you're looking at a heavily "HDR'd" image (and not in a good way). 
The technique we're going to learn here takes the image with the regular exposure 
and blends it with the HDR image to get the advantages of a tone-mapped HDR 
image, without all that bad stuff that can come with it. That way, people say, 
"Hey, is that an HDR image?" instead of, "Oh, that's been HDR'd!" 



Step One: 

Go to Mini Bridge, select your brack- 
eted photos, then Right-click on any 
one of those thumbnails and, from the 
pop-up menu that appears, under 
Photoshop, choose Merge to HDR 
Pro (as shown here). 



Step Two: 

When the Merge to HDR Pro dialog ap- 
pears, go ahead and choose the ScottS 
preset from the Preset pop-up menu at 
the top right of the dialog. Then, turn 
on the Edge Smoothness checkbox (as 
shown here) to reduce some of the harsh 
edges around the Piton mountains off in 
the distance and on the edges of the rail- 
ing's shadow in the foreground. When 
you do this, you can see some of the 
funky stuff I was talking about up in the 
intro — a fakey-looking sky, glows around 
the mountains and the two colorful glass 
creations on top of the two columns in 
the foreground. The sidewalk is so tex- 
tured now it almost looks like they need 
to clean it, and the trees on the left side 
look a bit "HDR'd" (not to mention, I ap- 
parently have a lot of sensor dust on my 
camera, because there are little spots and 
specks visible all over the sky, which we'll 
deal with later, so don't worry — we will 
deal with them). For now, just click OK to 
open the over-HDR'd image in Photoshop. 




Open with 



Batch... 

Image Processor... 

Load Files into Photoshop Layers.. 




► 1 98 Chapter 7 Creating HDR Images 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



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Step Three: 

Once the image opens in Photoshop, 
go ahead and save it as a PSD, and close 
the image window, because we need to 
open this image in Camera Raw and do 
some tweaking there. Once you've saved 
it, go under the File menu and choose 
Open (PC: Open As) to bring up the 
Open dialog and find that image you 
just saved as a PSD. Click on it and, from 
the Format (PC: Open As) pop-up menu, 
choose Camera Raw (as shown here), 
and now when you click Open, your 
image will open in Camera Raw. 



Step Four: 

Here's our HDR image opened in Cam- 
era Raw. We're going to make it more 
contrasty by dragging the Contrast slider 
to the right (here I dragged it over to +7), 
then let's pull back the Highlights a bit 
to -23, and then let's enhance the de- 
tail even more by increasing the Clarity 
amount to +26. Also, the photo looks a 
little bright (to me, anyway), so lower the 
Exposure to -0.55. That's all we need to 
do in Camera Raw, so go ahead and click 
the Open Image button to open your 
HDR image in Photoshop. 



(Continued) 



Creating HDR Images Chapter 7 199 ^ 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

Now, go back to Mini Bridge and 
find your bracketed shots. Double-click 
directly on the shot that is the normal, 
regular exposure (the one that's not 
over- or underexposed intentionally), so 
it opens in Camera Raw (as seen here). 
This regular-exposure image has its prob- 
lems, too: The building is pretty much in 
the shade, so you don't see any detail at 
all back there, or in the two columns in 
front. At the same time, the sky and Piton 
mountains in the background look great, 
the trees look okay, and the sidewalk 
doesn't look filthy, so there's good stuff 
here, too. We're going to mix the best 
parts of this regular-exposure image with 
the best parts of the HDR image. But, 
so this photo doesn't look too flat when 
we do this, I generally add contrast, 
open up the shadows a bit, increase 
the Clarity (to enhance texture and 
detail), and increase the Vibrance (so the 
sky looks nice and blue). 



Step Six: 

Click the Open Image button to 
open your regular-exposure image in 
Photoshop, and now you should have 
two images open: (1) the HDR image 
(with its problems), and (2) the normal- 
exposure image (with its problems). Now, 
it's time to take the best of each of these 
to help make an image that has the ben- 
efits of HDR, but without all the bad stuff. 





► 200 Chapter 7 Creating HDR Images 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



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Step Seven: 

Get the Move tool (V), press-and-hold 
the Shift key, and drag-and-drop the 
HDR image on top of your regular- 
exposure image (holding the Shift key 
makes sure the two line up). Note: If 
you hand-held your HDR bracketed 
shots, and Photoshop had to do some 
layer alignment as it applied the HDR 
effect, holding the Shift key may not 
be enough to line these two perfectly 
up. If that's the case (and it usually is), 
then in the Layers panel, Command- 
click (PC: Ctrl-click) on both layers to 
select them both, go under the Edit 
menu, choose Auto-Align Layers, 
and click OK to have Photoshop align 
them (as shown here). 



Step Eight: 

To make sure the images are actually 
perfectly in alignment, go to the Layers 
panel and toggle on/off the little Eye 
icon that appears to the left of the top 
layer's thumbnail. This shows/hides that 
layer, and you'll be able to immediately 
see whether they're perfectly lined up 
(if the image seems to shift a pixel or two, 
either left/right or up/down, you'll see it 
right away). Now, you may not need to 
do this, but just in case you do see that 
it's off by a few pixels, I want to show you 
how I fix this. At the top of the Layers 
panel, change your layer blend mode 
from Normal to Difference. This high- 
lights any alignment differences between 
the two layers. Your image should look al- 
most solid black (like this does), but if you 
see a strong color edge, it's probably off 
by a pixel or two. It's been my experience 
that if it's off, more often than not it just 
needs to be nudged one pixel to the right 
and one pixel down. You do this, with the 
Move tool still active, by hitting the Right 
Arrow key on your keyboard once and 
the Down Arrow key once. Now, toggle 
on/off the Eye icon, again, and see how 
that looks. 

(Continued) 



Creating HDR Images Chapter 7 201 ^ 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Nine: 

Now, if things look aligned correctly, 
switch your blend mode back to Normal 
(if not, keep nudging this top image a 
pixel or two until they're right on the 
money). Next, click on your top layer, so 
that only it is active, press-and-hold the 
Option (PC: Alt) key, and click on the 
Add Layer Mask icon at the bottom of 
the Layers panel to hide the HDR image 
layer behind a black mask. Get the Brush 
tool (B), choose a soft-edged brush from 
the Brush Picker in the Options Bar and, 
since your mask is black, you need to 
paint in the opposite color, so make sure 
your Foreground color is set to white. 
Now, begin painting over the parts of the 
image that you want to have a more HDR 
look. For example, here I'm painting over 
the railing on the left side, and it reveals 
the railing on the HDR image layer, which 
has more detail and dimension than the 
original image has. 



Step 10: 

So, that's the plan: paint in white over 
things where you want more detail and 
dimension from the HDR image layer. 
For example, I'd paint over the building 
(but, I'd avoid the tent on the top, which 
looks okay), then I'd paint over the stone 
columns in front (as seen here), and you 
can see the effect it's having. All that 
detail is coming out now, but look at our 
sky and the mountains — they look real- 
istic. We're kind of blending fantasy and 
reality in the same image. 



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► 202 Chapter 7 Creating HDR Images 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



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Step 11: 

Here's a tip that really makes all of this 
work together pretty seamlessly: There 
will be areas in your image, like the glass 
ornaments on top of the columns, where 
it would be really tedious and tricky to 
paint over them without really affecting 
the sky. In those cases (and I do this in 
almost every image), you want to blend 
"some" of the HDR image here, but not 
the full strength. So, go up to the Options 
Bar and lower the Opacity of the Brush 
tool to 50%. Now when you paint in white, 
it only paints in the HDR image at half- 
strength, so bringing out these glass 
ornaments is much easier, because you 
don't have to mask it perfectly. 



Step 12: 

Now that you're at 50%, you can bring 
out other parts of the image without them 
looking "over-the-top." For example, here 
I painted at 50% over the trees on the 
left side to bring out some of that detail. 
I painted over the sidewalk, as well, to 
bring out half the HDR in it. But, I avoided 
that shadow of the railing, because once 
I painted over it, it got a funky-looking 
edge, so I just pressed Command-Z (PC: 
Ctrl-Z) to undo my painting, and then re- 
painted the sidewalk while avoiding that 
shadow. I painted over the other walkway 
on the left, too, but when I painted over 
the red glass ornaments, it looked weird, 
so I used Undo, and painted those col- 
umns again, but not the red glass. When 
you're done, choose Flatten Image from 
the Layers panel's flyout menu. Then, 
finally, get the Spot Healing Brush (J) 
and click once on each of those sensor 
dust spots in the sky to remove them, 
giving you the image seen here. 

(Continued) 



Creating HDR Images Chapter 7 203 i 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Single Image Regular Exposure 

Here's the original exposure — one of 
the five bracketed photos taken for an 
HDR image. 



Five Images Combined into HDR 

Here's the image after having those 
five bracketed exposures merged into 
one image using HDR Pro and the 
Scott5 preset (which looks kind of funky 
for this shot, but it was the best choice 
from the presets). 



A Blend of the Two 

Here's where we blended the two images, 
using the sky and Pitons from the original 
single image, mixed with varying amounts 
of the HDR image. For example, compare 
the three sidewalks: the top one looks like 
a regular exposure, the middle "totally 
HDR'd," and this one has only 50% of the 
HDR look. Also, look at the glass orna- 
ments on top of the columns — too dark 
in the top shot, then they have those 
awful glows in the middle one, but 
this one has the right mix. 




► 204 Chapter 7 Creating HDR Images 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 




Single Image Regular Exposure 

Here's another example using the same 
technique and similar settings. Shown 
here is the regular exposure — one of 
the five bracketed photos taken for an 
HDR image. 



Five Images Combined into HDR 

Here's the image after having those five 
bracketed exposures merged into one 
image using HDR Pro and the Scott5 
preset (it looks great on the metal sculp- 
ture, but the sky looks totally "HDR'd"). 



A Blend of the Two 

Here's where I blended the two images, 
using the nice clean blue sky from the 
normal-exposure single image, mixed 
with the HDR image. In this instance, 
I didn't have to paint with the brush at 
50% at all — I was able to just paint in 
the entire sculpture at 100% opacity, to 
give the blended image you see here. 



Creating HDR Images Chapter 7 205 i 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



HDR Finishing 
Techniques (Vignet- 
ting & Soft Glow) 



Both of these are totally optional (but very popular) finishing moves for HDR images. 
I actually briefly covered these two effects earlier in this chapter when I applied 
them to our projects as finishing moves. But, I wanted to put them here separately, 
so if you wanted to just add one of these finishing techniques, you wouldn't have to 
go fishing through all those steps to find them. Plus, I'm going to show an alternate 
way to apply vignettes that keeps you from having to go back to Camera Raw. 



Step One: 

Once you've processed your bracketed 
photos in HDR Pro, you'll usually be re- 
opening your HDR image in Camera Raw 
for a second round of tweaking (see page 
184 in this chapter for how to open it in 
Camera Raw). We'll start with our first fin- 
ishing move: adding a dark edge vignette. 
There are actually two different places to 
apply vignettes in Camera Raw, and they 
both produce different looks, but the one 
I think looks the best (and gives you the 
most control) is Post Crop Vignetting (de- 
signed to be used after you've cropped 
the image, but you can apply it to an 
uncropped image, no problem). To get 
to this feature, in Camera Raw, click on 
the Effects icon (the fourth icon from the 
right) at the top of the Panel area. 



Step Two: 

In the Post Crop Vignetting section, first 
make sure Highlight Priority is the se- 
lected Style (it's the only one that actually 
looks good), then drag the Amount slider 
to the left to darken the edges all the way 
around your image (as seen here). The 
Midpoint slider determines how far that 
darkening extends in toward the center of 
your photo (so I dragged it just a little to 
the left to make the dark edge bigger). 
If you want the edges extending inward 
to be softer, you can increase the Feather 
amount (although I normally don't). 








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"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



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Step Three: 

Now, if you're already done with your 
second round of tweaking in Camera 
Raw, and you decide you want to add 
an edge vignette, you don't have to go 
back to Camera Raw again, because the 
Lens Correction filter in Photoshop also 
lets you do vignetting (although I don't 
like the quality nearly as much as the Post 
Crop Vignetting in Camera Raw). To get 
to this, go under the Filter menu in Photo- 
shop and choose Lens Correction. When 
the dialog appears (shown here), click 
on the Custom tab near the top right. 
In the Vignette section, drag the Amount 
slider to the left to darken the edges, and 
then drag the Midtone slider to the left 
a bit, too. These same controls are also 
found in Camera Raw and do the same 
thing (if you go to the Lens Corrections 
panel and click on the Manual tab). 



Step Four: 

To get the Soft Glow finishing move 
that's so popular for HDR images, try 
this: Press Command-J (PC: Ctrl-J) to 

duplicate your Background layer, then 
go under the Filter menu, under Blur, 
and choose Gaussian Blur. Enter 50 
pixels for your Blur amount, and click OK, 
then at the top of the Layers panel, lower 
the Opacity of this blurry layer to 70%. 
It still looks really blurry, but what gives 
this the right look is when you change 
the blend mode of this blurry layer from 
Normal to Soft Light. Now, you get that 
soft glow across the image that takes the 
edge off the harsh HDR look. Again, both 
of these finishing moves are optional, so 
don't think you have to apply them, but 
now at least if you do want to apply them, 
you know how to do it. 



Creating HDR Images Chapter 7 207 i 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Photoshop Killer Tips 



Zooming In Really Tight? There's 
a Pixel Grid to Help You Out 

You won't see this neat little feature un- 
less you zoom in to 600% magnification 
or more — it's a little pixel grid that appears 
that makes it visually easier to tell pixels 
apart when you're zoomed in crazy tight. 
It's on by default (give it a try — zoom in 
crazy tight and see), but if you want to turn 
it off, just go under the View menu, under 
Show, and choose Pixel Grid. 




|j!::E:E[[i jfjsisijM 

Duplicate Multiple Layers at Once 
Pressing Command-J (PC: Ctrl-J) is not 

only the fastest way to duplicate a layer, it 
is also now the fastest way to duplicate 
multiple layers. Just go to the Layers panel, 
Command-click (PC: Ctrl-click) on the lay- 
ers you want duplicated to select them, 
then use that same shortcut to duplicate 
all the selected layers (this is new in CS6). 



Keeping Your Third-Party Plug-Ins 
from Loading into Photoshop 



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hold the Shift key. A dialog will appear 
and, if you click the Yes button, it disables 
any third-party plug-ins. This can come in 
handy if you think you're having a problem 
in Photoshop caused by one. If you restart 
with them disabled and the problem goes 
away, you've probably found your culprit. 

Create a New Document 
Just Like the Last One 

There's a super-handy, yet little known 

shortcut, that lets you create a brand new 

document using the exact same specs 

(size, resolution, color mode, etc.) as the 

last one you made. Instead of choosing 

Command-N (PC: Ctrl-N) to bring up 

the New dialog, just press Command- 

Option-N (PC: Ctrl-Alt-N), and when the 

New dialog appears, all the specs for your 

last document will be entered for you. 

Saving Time in HDR Pro 

The more images you use to create your 
HDR images, the longer it takes HDR Pro 
to compile your final image, so this is a 
case where less is more. I usually use five 
images (as I explained at the beginning 
of this chapter), but an interesting tid- 
bit I learned from one of the Photoshop 
product managers is that, for the best 
results, you need more darker photos 
than lighter ones. So, if you don't mind 
the extra wait, you're better off having 
just one image with a really bright expo- 
sure and four darker ones, than you are 
with an equal balance. 



Editing the Lens Correction Grid 

When you use the Lens Correction filter 
in CS6, the first thing you'll notice is that 
"annoying grid" isn't turned on by default 
(by the way, the only reason it was annoy- 
ing was because it used to be turned on 
by default). Now, not only is it off by de- 
fault, but you can edit the size and color of 
the grid itself. When you turn on the Show 
Grid checkbox at the bottom of the Lens 




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swatch become available to the right of the 
checkbox. Also, although there is a grid 
in the Lens Corrections panel of Camera 
Raw (press V to toggle it on/off), you can't 
change the size or color of that grid. 

Hide All Your Panels Fast 

If you want to focus on your photo, and 
temporarily hide your Toolbox, Options 
Bar, and all your panels, just press the Tab 
key. Press it again to bring them all back. 

Renaming Multiple Layers Fast 

Want to rename a bunch of layers? 
Just double-click directly on the first 
layer's name to highlight it, type in a 
new name, and then press the Tab key 
to jump to the next layer and its name 
field will be highlighted, ready to be 
renamed. The Tab key takes you to the 
next layer down; to jump back to a 
previous layer, press Shift-Tab. 



► 208 Chapter 7 Creating HDR Images 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



Photoshop Killer Tips 



Need Help Finding the Right Colors? 

Back in CS4, Adobe introduced this very 
cool little utility called "Kuler" which was 
designed to help you find, mix, match, and 
try out different color schemes, and it was 
so popular that it spawned its own online 
community, with users sharing and rating 
different sets of colors based on themes. 
You can find Kuler built right into Photo- 
shop in its own panel. Just go under the 
Window menu, under Extensions, and 
choose Kuler, and browse some of the 
most popular color combos right within 
Photoshop. If you see a set of colors you 
like, double-click on it to see them as 
larger swatches in a panel. To make any 
of those color swatches your Foreground 
color, just double-click on it. 




Putting Your Drop Shadow Right 
Where You Want It 

If you're adding a drop shadow behind 
your photo using a Drop Shadow layer 
style (choose Drop Shadow from the 
Add a Layer Style icon's pop-up menu), 




you don't have to mess with the Angle 
or Distance fields whatsoever. Instead, 
move your cursor outside the Layer Style 
dialog — over into your image area — and 
just click-and-drag the shadow itself right 
where you want it. 

Getting Rid of Your 
Empty Layers Fast 



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In CS5, Adobe included a built-in script 
that will go through your Layers panel and 
remove any empty layers (layers with noth- 
ing on them) automatically (once you get a 
large multi-layered project going, you wind 
up with more of these than you'd think). To 
have Photoshop tidy things up for you, go 
under the File menu, under Scripts, and 
choose Delete All Empty Layers. 

Removing Noise from 
Cell Phone Photos 

Since Photoshop is a pro tool, most of us 
probably wouldn't even think of using 
Camera Raw's built-in Noise Reduction 
feature to remove the noise from our cell 
phone camera's photos, but. ..why not? 
Cell phone photos are notorious for color 
noise, which Camera Raw cleans up really 
well. Try it one time, and I'll bet you'll use 
it more than you ever dreamed (to open 




a cell phone photo in Camera Raw, just 
find it on your computer in Mini Bridge, 
then Right-click on it and, from under 
Open With, choose Camera Raw). 

Using the HUD Pop-Up 
Color Picker 

If you've ever thought, "There's got to be 
an easier way to pick colors than clicking on 
the Foreground color swatch every time," 
you're gonna love this: It's a pop-up color 
picker (Adobe calls it the HUD [Heads-Up 
Display], because you keep your eyes on 
the image, instead of looking over and 
down at the Foreground/Background color 
swatches). First, choose a Brush tool, then 
press Command-Option-Ctrl (PC: Alt- 
Shift) and click (PC: Right-click) on your 
image. It brings up a simplified color 
picker where you can choose your color 
(I find it easier to choose the hue first, 
from the bar on the right, then choose 
the tint and saturation of the color from 
the box on the left). 




Creating HDR Images Chapter 7 209 4 




Photo by Scott Kelby Exposure: 1/200 sec | Focal Length: 300 mm | Aperture Value: f/2.8 



Chapter 8 Fixing Common Problems 




Little Problems 

fixing common problems 



The title for this chapter comes from the 2009 movie 
Little Problems (written and directed by Matt Pearson), but 
I could have just as easily gone with the 2008 short Little 
Problems (written and directed by Michael Lewen), but there 
was one big thing that made the choice easy. The first movie 
was about zombies. You just can't make a bad movie about 
zombies. It's a lock. Throw a couple of hapless teens (or in 
this case "an unlikely couple") into some desolate location 
with a couple hundred flesh-starved undead, and you've got 
gold, baby, gold! Now, has anyone ever wondered, even for 
a second, why every zombie in the rich and colorful history 
of zombies has an insatiable hunger for human flesh and 
only human flesh? Why can't there be zombies that have an 
insatiable hunger for broccoli? Then, in their bombed-out 
shell of a desolate vacant city, on every corner there would 
be other zombies selling broccoli the size of azalea bushes. 



Anyway, it's just a little too coincidental that every zombie 
wants to eat you, but they don't want to eat something that 
might actually keep them alive, and is in ample and easily 
reproducible supply, like broccoli, or spring rolls, or chowder. 
Nope, it has to be human flesh, even though you know and 
I know (say it with me) it tastes like chicken (well, that's what 
I've been told, anyway). Another thing that drew me to the 
first Little Problems was the director's last name, seeing as all 
my books are published by subsidiaries of Pearson Education, 
a company who somehow chose to hire Ted Waitt as my 
editor, despite the fact that they were forewarned by the 
DCBGC (the Desolate City Broccoli Growers' Consortium) 
that Ted might not actually be the strict vegetarian he 
claimed to be in his resume. I probably shouldn't say 
anything bad about Ted, though. I don't want to bite the 
hand that feeds me. 



211 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



When Your 

Subject Is in 

the Shadows 



We all wind up shooting subjects that are backlit (where the light is behind your 
subject). That's because our eyes automatically adjust to the situation and we see 
the subject just fine in our viewfinder. The problem is our cameras aren't nearly as 
sophisticated as our eyes are, so you're almost guaranteed to get some shots where 
the subject is way too dark. Although I feel you get better results using Camera Raw's 
Exposure and Highlights sliders, the Shadows/Highlights adjustment does a fairly 
decent job, and there's a trick you can use to make the adjustment re-editable. 



Step One: 

Open a photo where your subject is 
in the shadows (it can be a person, or 
a building, or anything backlit). In this 
example, the light is behind our subject, 
so he's pretty much fully in the shadows. 
Ideally, we'd like to brighten him up, and 
the area around him, as well, to balance 
out the light in the photo. To do this, first 
go under the Filter menu and choose 
Convert for Smart Filters. This lets you 
apply the adjustment as if it was an ad- 
justment layer (meaning you can re-edit 
it later if you need to, or even delete the 
adjustment altogether). Even though the 
adjustment we're going to apply isn't 
found under the Filter menu, for some 
reason Adobe lets it act like it is a smart 
filter, so why not take advantage of 
it, eh? Now go under the Image menu, 
under Adjustments, and choose 
Shadows/Highlights. 



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► 212 



Chapter 8 



Fixing Common Problems 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



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Step Two: 

If you're choosing Shadows/Highlights, 
you probably have a problem in the 
shadow areas, which is why, by default, 
it's set to open up (lighten) the shadow 
areas in your photo by 35%. However, 
in this case, our subject is so buried in 
the shadows that we'll have to open the 
shadows quite a bit. The problem with 
opening the shadows 50% or higher is 
your photos tend to look kinda "weird 
and milky" (as you can see here, where 
I've increased it to 70%, and now he 
almost looks like he has a sunburn). 



Step Three: 

To get around that, turn on the Show 
More Options checkbox at the bottom 
of the dialog. This brings up an expanded 
version of the dialog (as shown here). The 
key to fixing this "weird and milky" look is 
to drag the Radius slider over to the right 
until it smooths out the effect and looks 
normal (here, I dragged it over to 143 pix- 
els because that's where it looked most 
natural to me, but it really just depends 
on the photo. I would say that most of 
the time I set the Radius to around 125 to 
175). By the way, the Radius amount deter- 
mines how many pixels each adjustment 
affects, so to affect a wider range of pix- 
els, you'd increase the amount, which is 
what we did here. 

TIP: Save a New Default 

If you come up with some settings you 
like, click the Save As Defaults button in 
the bottom-left corner of the dialog, and 
now it will open with your settings. 



(Continued) 



Fixing Common Problems Chapter 8 213 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Four: 

Now that the shadows are opened up 
(and look reasonably realistic), if you want, 
you can darken the highlights behind him. 
In most cases, you'll only have to fix one 
or the other — the shadows or the high- 
lights — but not both. For example, to 
darken the sky behind him a bit, go to the 
Highlights section and drag the Amount 
slider to the right (as shown here; I also 
increased the Radius slider quite a bit, as 
well). If you drag too far, you might start 
to see some banding in the sky (where 
you start to see lines where the colors 
change, instead of a smooth transition 
between colors), so just keep an eye on 
the sky as you drag. If later you need to 
tweak these settings, because you ap- 
plied this as a smart filter, you can go 
to the Layers panel, double-click directly 
on the words "Shadows/Highlights" (as 
shown here), and the Shadows/Highlights 
dialog re-opens, with the settings you 
used previously. Just make any changes 
you want, then click OK. 



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► 214 Chapter 8 Fixing Common Problems 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



Nothing ruins an outdoor shot like a dull gray sky, but luckily, 
in many cases, you can save the shot by darkening the midtones a bit, 
and adding a blue tint or gradient to the sky. Here's how to do both: 



Fixing Shots with 
a Dull Gray Sky 



ltaly-766 jpg @ 66.7% {RGB/ 8) 




Step One: 

Here's a shot where the sky is really blah. 
Not totally 100%, but close enough. Also, 
the clouds are a little dark, so even if you 
went into Camera Raw and lowered the 
exposure, those darkish clouds would 
look like rain clouds, and you'd have a 
whole different problem to deal with (an 
underexposed photo with the buildings 
in the shadows). So, this technique will 
work pretty well for this image. You'll start 
by making a selection of the sky and your 
first thought might be to use the Magic 
Wand tool. Now, if the sky was just a flat 
sky with no clouds, that would probably 
work out okay, but in this case (a sky with 
clouds), you're much better off using the 
Quick Selection tool (it'll select that sky 
in all of 5 seconds). So, get the Quick 
Selection tool (W) from the Toolbox, click 
it on the far-left side of the sky, then drag 
it over to the right side, and — BAM! — it's 
selected (as shown here). 



(Continued) 



Fixing Common Problems Chapter 8 215 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Two: 

When I make a selection like this, to 
make sure it didn't miss any little areas, 
I usually expand (grow) the selection 
outward by a pixel or two (that way, it 
kind of "digs-in" to the city a little and 
eliminates any little gaps that would be 
a giveaway you tweaked the sky). To do 
this, go under the Select menu, under 
Modify, and choose Expand. When 
the dialog appears, if it's a really high- 
resolution image, use 2 pixels. If it's a 
6- or 8-megapixel image (or smaller), 
just use 1 pixel, then click OK (you 
probably won't see anything onscreen 
when you do this — you just have to 
trust that it actually expanded out- 
ward by a pixel or two). 

Step Three: 

To get a realistic color for the sky, we're 
going to open another photo that already 
has a nice sky color (you can download 
this same photo, and most of the key 
photos used in this book, at the web ad- 
dress listed in the introduction at the front 
of the book). Once you open the image, 
switch to the Eyedropper tool (I), and click 
once on the brightest blue area in the 
image (as shown here) to make that your 
Foreground color. Now, press the letter X 
to swap your Foreground and Background 
colors, then click the Eyedropper on the 
darkest blue in the photo (higher in the 
sky), so that now your Foreground is a 
darker blue, and your Background is a 
lighter blue. 

TIP: The Color Selector Ring 

That ring that appears when you use the 
Eyedropper tool is there to help you see 
which color you're selecting. The outside 
ring is a neutral gray, which just helps to 
make sure you're seeing the right color 
without being influenced by other colors 
around it. The bottom half of the inside 
ring shows the old color, and the top half 
shows what your Foreground color would 
change to if you clicked right now. 



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► 216 



Chapter 8 



Fixing Common Problems 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



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Step Four: 

Go back to the original image, then go 
to the Layers panel and add a new, blank 
layer by clicking on the Create a New 
Layer icon at the bottom of the panel, 
then switch to the Gradient tool (G), and 
click-and-drag your gradient from the 
top of the photo down to the bottom of 
the sky (the light blue color should be at 
the bottom of the gradient). This fills the 
new layer with a gradient made up of 
your Foreground and Background colors 
(as seen here). For some images, you can 
leave this gradient as is (or maybe just 
lower the layer opacity a little to let it 
blend in), but I think it usually looks a 
little too fakey, which is why there are 
two more steps. 



Step Five: 

First, press Command-D (PC: Ctrl-D) 

to Deselect, then go to the Layers panel 
and change the layer's blend mode from 
Normal to Color (shown here), just to see 
how the color itself looks. In this case, it 
looks a bit too cyan and fakey, so we'll 
have to take it another step further (don't 
worry — it's easy), but at least we can see 
that we're in the ballpark (so to speak). 



(Continued) 



Fixing Common Problems Chapter 8 217 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Six: 

There are two layer blend modes that 
add contrast to our layer: Soft Light and 
Overlay. Let's try both of those. When 
you try Soft Light, you can see its effect 
is more subtle, and Overlay (shown here) 
is more contrasty (and in this case, that's 
what I'd go with, because it looks darker, 
but not at all over-the-top. If you want a 
really dramatic sky, try Color Burn, and 
then lower the layer's Opacity to around 
50%). If you're not sure which one you 
want, just press Shift-+ (plus sign) to 
toggle through all the different blend 
modes until you find one you like. A 
before and after are shown below (it's 
subtle, but it's supposed to be). 



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ltaly-766.jpg @ 66.7% (Layer 1, RGR/S) * 





Before 



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After 



► 218 Chapter 8 Fixing Common Problems 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



In CS4 and earlier versions of Photoshop, when we wanted to dodge and burn, we 

had to jump through a bunch of hoops (creating special layers, and using blend 

modes and such), because the Dodge and Burn tools were... well... let's just say they 

weren't the best (and that's being kind). Luckily, back in Photoshop CS5, Adobe 

updated these tools, which totally fixed the problem, and now it's safe to use the 

Dodge and Burn tools for lightening and darkening different parts of your image. 



Using the Dodge 
and Burn Tools 




Step One: 

Before we dig into this, I just want to 
you let you know up front that I would 
normally do my dodging and burning 
inside Camera Raw using the Adjustment 
Brush (and do the lightening and dark- 
ening using only the Exposure slider). 
However, if you're already in Photoshop 
and don't want to go back to Camera 
Raw, then here's how you'd do it: In the 
photo shown here, our light is kind of 
out of balance. The thing I want people 
drawn to is the gondola on the left in 
the foreground, but the brightest thing 
in the photo (the thing that draws your 
eye) is the building in the top-left corner, 
which is where I don't want the viewer 
looking. In fact, almost the entire fore- 
ground is in shadow, so first, we're going 
to dodge (lighten) the gondola, and then 
we'll brighten up the buildings and side- 
walk on the right side of the image. Then, 
we're going to burn (darken) the buildings 
on the left and the sky. Basically, we're just 
going to rearrange how the light is falling 
on our photo. Now, I don't use the Dodge 
and Burn tools directly on the original 
photo. Instead, press Command-J (PC: 
Ctrl-J) to duplicate the Background layer. 
That way, if we don't like what we've done, 
we can lessen the effect (by lowering the 
layer's opacity) or undo it altogether by 
throwing the layer away. 



(Continued) 



Fixing Common Problems Chapter 8 219 ^ 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Two: 

Get the Dodge tool (O) from the Tool- 
box (as shown here), and begin painting 
over the area you want to lighten (in our 
case, we'll start by painting over the gon- 
dola on the left — you can see the brush 
cursor near the front of it here). Keep 
holding the mouse button down as you 
paint, because the Dodge and Burn tools 
have a build-up effect — each time you 
release the mouse button and start paint- 
ing again, the amount of Dodge (or Burn) 
builds up. 



Step Three: 

Release the mouse button, and paint over 
that same gondola area again, and you'll 
see how it gets another level brighter. 
Remember: While the mouse button is 
held down, you're painting one level of 
brightness. Release the mouse button, 
then click-and-paint over that area again, 
and you're painting over the original 
brightness with more brightness, and 
so on (it's kind of like polishing a silver 
platter — the more times you polish it, the 
brighter it gets). Now look at how much 
brighter the gondola is here, compared 
with the original image in Step One. Next, 
let's work on the buildings on the right 
and the walkway. 




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► 220 



Chapter 8 



Fixing Common Problems 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 





Step Four: 

Start painting over both buildings and 
the walkway to dodge (brighten) them, 
but keep the mouse button held down 
the whole time to paint just one level of 
brightness over them. Now, release the 
mouse button and paint over just the 
orange building on the far right again 
(it's pretty dark, so we need to brighten 
it more than the rest, like you see here). 
Now, before we switch to burning on 
the buildings on the left, take a look 
up in the Options Bar for this tool, and 
you can see that we've been dodging 
just the Midtones (and that's generally 
where I do my dodging and burning), 
but if you wanted the tool to just affect 
the Highlight or Shadow areas, you can 
choose that from that Range pop-up 
menu. Also, the 50% Exposure amount 
is fine for something like this, but if I were 
doing this on a portrait, I'd usually want 
something much more subtle, and I'd 
lower the amount to around 10%— 15%. 



Step Five: 

Now let's switch to burning: first start 
by pressing Command-J (PC: Ctrl-J) to 

duplicate your top layer. So, at this point, 
you've got the original untouched image 
as your Background layer, the brightened 
Dodge Layer in the middle (I renamed it 
"Dodge Layer" just to make it easier to 
see), and a copy of the brightened layer 
on top, which is the one we're going to 
burn on (I named it "Burn Layer"). By 
keeping everything on separate layers, 
if you don't like the burning effect, you 
can reduce it by lowering the opacity, 
or delete it altogether and you won't lose 
the dodging you did on the layer below 
it. Now get the Burn tool (as shown here), 
and paint over the buildings on the left. 
By darkening those areas, it takes the 
focus off of them, which helps lead the 
eye to the gondola. (Whether you realize 
it or not, you're painting with light. Cool!) 

(Continued) 



Fixing Common Problems Chapter 8 221 ^ 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Six: 

Lastly, we can darken the sky a bit by 
burning over it, as well. Just remember — 
while you're painting, keep your mouse 
button held down the whole time, or part 
of your sky will be one shade darker, and 
then another part might be two shades 
darker (where the two areas overlap). One 
more thing: up in the Options Bar you'll 
see a checkbox for Protect Tones. That's 
the checkbox that helps to keep the color 
of what you're dodging and burning in- 
tact, so things just get brighter or darker, 
and not sunburned and color saturated. 
I leave this on all the time, even when 
I'm not dodging and burning portraits 
(which is when it's most useful). Below 
is a before/after, and while I'm usually 
fairly subtle with my dodging and burn- 
ing, here I took things a little farther 
than I normally would, just to show a 
clear example of the power of dodging 
and burning. 



ro 





After 



► 222 Chapter 8 Fixing Common Problems 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



I get more requests for how to fix this problem than probably all the rest 

combined. The reason is it's so darn hard to fix. If you're lucky, you get to spend 

an hour or more desperately cloning. In many cases, you're just stuck with it. 

However, if you're smart, you'll invest an extra 30 seconds while shooting to take 

one shot with the glasses off (or ideally, one "glasses off" shot for each new pose). 

Do that, and Photoshop will make this fix absolutely simple. If this sounds like a 

pain, then you've never spent an hour desperately cloning away a reflection. 



Fixing 
Reflections 
in Glasses 



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Step One: 

Before we get into this, make sure you 
read the short intro up top here first, or 
you're going to wonder what's going on 
in Step Two. Okay, here's a photo of our 
subject with her glasses on, and you can 
see the reflection in them (pretty bad on 
the left side, not quite as bad on the right, 
but it definitely needs fixing). The ideal 
situation is to tell your subject that after 
you take the first shot, they need to freeze 
for just a moment while you (or a friend, 
assistant, etc.) walk over and remove their 
glasses (that way they don't change their 
pose, which they absolutely will if they 
take their own glasses off), then take a 
second shot. That's the ideal situation. 



Step Two: 

Unfortunately, that's not what happened 
for my second shot — our subject decided 
(maybe 10 minutes later) to remove her 
glasses. But, luckily, I had shots in the 
same shoot both with and without her 
glasses on (of course, that was luck — you 
should definitely plan to shoot some with 
them on, then some off, during the shoot). 
So, I had to look for one where her head 
position was somewhat similar. This shot 
isn't right on the money, so we'll have 
to tweak it a bit to make it work, but 
at least we have a shot to work with, 
so I'm not complaining. 

(Continued) 



Fixing Common Problems 



Chapter 8 



223 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Three: 

With both images open in Photoshop, 
get the Move tool (V), press-and-hold 
the Shift key, and then click-and-drag 
the "no glasses" photo on top of the 
"glasses" photo (as I did here). Now, if 
you planned ahead and took shots with 
and without the glasses (one right after 
the other), then you can take a shortcut 
and use Auto-Align Layers to perfectly 
match up the two shots. In the Layers 
panel, Command-click (PC: Ctrl-click) on 
each layer to select both (as shown here), 
then go under the Edit menu and choose 
Auto-Align Layers. Leave the Auto op- 
tion selected and click OK, and in just a 
few seconds, they will be aligned right 
on the money. Now, if you did all of this 
"the right way" in the studio, then you 
can jump to the second part of Step Six. 
However, since the shots we're using here 
were taken hand-held, about 10 minutes 
apart, we can't use Auto-Align Layers (I 
tried it and it distorted things really badly), 
so we'll have to do it manually (another 
reason why setting this up the right way 
in the studio really pays off). 

Step Four: 

You need to be able to "see through" 
the top layer, so you can see her eyes 
on the bottom layer (that way, you can 
line them up). So, start by going to the 
Layers panel and lowering the Opacity 
of the top layer to around 50% or 60% 
(as shown here). Now, with the Move tool, 
position the eyes on the top layer as close 
as you can get to those on the bottom 
layer (it won't match exactly, of course, 
because her head is tilted differently. So, 
at this point, just get as close as you can, 
even though you'll still be quite a bit off, 
as seen here at bottom. We're a little 
closer, but still not there). 



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► 224 



Chapter 8 



Fixing Common Problems 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



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Step Five: 

If you look at her shoulders back in Step 
Four, you can see that not only is her head 
tilted, but I either zoomed in or zoomed 
out just a little because she is a different 
size in the each of the photos. So, press 
Command-T (PC: Ctrl-T) to bring up Free 
Transform, press-and-hold the Shift key (to 
keep everything proportional), then click 
on a corner point and drag inward until 
her shoulders look about the same size in 
each of the photos. Now, we can rotate 
the top photo, so her eyes better match 
up. To rotate this top layer, go ahead and 
zoom out (to shrink the size of your image 
window), then pull out the corners of the 
image window, so you see some of the 
dark gray canvas area around your image 
(as seen here). Now, when you move your 
cursor outside the Free Transform bound- 
ing box, it will change into a two-headed 
rounded arrow, so you can click-and-drag 
in a circular motion to rotate the top layer. 
{Note: You may need to move your cursor 
inside the bounding box to reposition the 
top layer, as well.) 



Step Six: 

Once it looks pretty well lined up, 
press the Return (PC: Enter) key on 

your keyboard to lock in your resizing 
and rotation, then raise the Opacity of 
this top layer back to 100%. Now, all we 
really need from the image on the top 
layer is the area that appears inside her 
frames. So, press-and-hold the Option 
(PC: Alt) key and click on the Add Layer 
Mask icon at the bottom of the Layers 
panel to hide this rotated layer behind 
a black layer mask (as shown here). 



(Continued) 



Fixing Common Problems Chapter 8 225 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Seven: 

Now, with your Foreground color set to 
white, get the Brush tool (B), choose a 
small, soft-edged brush from the Brush 
Picker up in the Options Bar, then simply 
start painting over the lens on the right, 
and it reveals the version of her eye with- 
out the glasses on (as seen here). What 
you're doing is revealing the top layer, 
but just where you want it. 



Step Eight: 

Once the eye on the right is done, do 
the same thing for the eye on the left. 
Make sure you use a small brush and be 
careful not to accidentally paint over any 
of the frames. If you do make a mistake, 
no biggie, just press X to switch your 
Foreground color to black and paint 
the frames back in. Now, remember, this 
whole process would be made a whole 
lot easier (you could skip Steps Four and 
Five altogether) if you remember, once 
you get a look you like in the studio, to 
have your subject freeze, remove their 
glasses, and take another shot. Then, 
Auto-Align Layers can do its thing and 
save you a lot of time and trouble. A 
before and after are shown on the 
next page. 



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► 226 



Chapter 8 



Fixing Common Problems 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 




Before (with the softboxes reflecting in her glasses) 



After (the reflections are gone) 



Fixing Common Problems Chapter 8 227 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Fixing Group Shots 
the Easy Way 



Group shots are always a challenge because, without a doubt, somebody in the 
group will be totally hammered (at least, that's been the experience with my family. 
You know I'm kidding, right?). Okay, the real problem is that in group photos there's 
always one or more people who blinked at just the wrong time, or forgot to smile, 
or weren't looking at the camera, etc. Of course, you could just take their expression 
from another frame and combine it with this one, but that takes a lot of work. 
Well, at least it did before the Auto-Align Layers feature. This thing rocks! 



Step One: 

Here's a group shot where one of the 
subjects (the guy on the right) is kind 
of squinting and looking away. 



Step Two: 

Of course, with group shots, you take 
as many shots as the group will endure, 
and, luckily, a few frames later, we have 
one where the guy on the right looks 
great. But, we can't use this shot, be- 
cause now the guy on the left is looking 
away (and he's a bit out of focus, as well). 
So, the idea here is to take the guy on 
the right from this shot and combine him 
with the first photo to make one single 
group photo where they're all smiling 
and looking at the camera. 




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► 228 



Chapter 8 



Fixing Common Problems 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 






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Step Three: 

Start by opening both photos in Photo- 
shop and dragging them into the same 
document: get the Move tool (V), press- 
and-hold the Shift key, and click-and- 
drag the photo where the guy on the 
right looks good over on top of the 
other photo, where he's squinting and 
looking away (it will appear as its own 
layer in the other document, as you can 
see in the Layers panel shown here). 



Step Four: 

Usually, just pressing-and-holding the 
Shift key will help the photos line up 
pretty well (especially if the shots were 
taken with your camera on a tripod), but 
if you hand-held the shots, or if your sub- 
jects moved a bit, you'll need Photoshop 
to line them up precisely for you. You do 
this by going to the Layers panel, Com- 
mand-clicking (PC: Ctrl-clicking) on both 
layers to select them (as shown here), 
then going under the Edit menu and 
choosing Auto-Align Layers. When the 
Auto-Align Layers dialog appears, leave 
Auto selected at the top, and then click 
OK to have Photoshop align the two 
layers for you (and it usually does a 
pretty darn amazing job, too!). 



(Continued) 



Fixing Common Problems Chapter 8 22<H 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

Now that they're aligned, click on the top 
layer in the Layers panel to make it the ac- 
tive layer. Press-and-hold the Option (PC: 
Alt) key and click on the Add Layer Mask 
icon at the bottom of the Layers panel 
to hide the top layer (with the guy on 
the right looking at the camera) behind 
a black layer mask. Now, get the Brush 
tool (B), choose a medium-sized, soft- 
edged brush from the Brush Picker in the 
Options Bar, and with your Foreground 
color set to white, paint over the guy on 
the right's head. As you do, it reveals the 
good version of him where he's looking at 
the camera (as shown here). Keep painting 
until his head, shirt, and basically as much 
as you need, look natural in the photo (in 
this case, his body position shifted a bit, 
so I had to paint over his neck, chest, and 
shoulders, as well). When you're done, 
get the Crop tool (C) and crop the image 
down to size. The final is shown below. 





After: Parts of the two photos are combined to make one perfect group shot 



Before: The guy on the left is looking away and is out of focus 



► 230 Chapter 8 Fixing Common Problems 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



Most of the selecting jobs you'll ever have to do in Photoshop are pretty easy, and 

you can usually get away with using the Magic Wand, Lasso, or Pen tools for most 

jobs, but the one that has always kicked our butts is when we have to select hair. 

Over the years we've come up with all sorts of tricks, including the intricate Channels 

techniques I covered in my Photoshop Channels Book, but all these techniques 

kind of went right out the window when Adobe supercharged the Quick Selection 

tool in Photoshop CS5 with the new Refine Edge feature. This is, hands down, 

one of the most useful, and most powerful, tools in all of Photoshop. 



Making Really 
Tricky Selections, 
Like Hair (and Some 
Cool Compositing 
Tricks, Too!) 





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Step One: 

Start by opening an image that has a 
challenging area to select (like our sub- 
ject's hair here, which is being blown by 
a fan). Then, get the Quick Selection tool 
(W) from the Toolbox (as shown here). 



Step Two: 

Here's how it works: you just take the 
tool and paint loosely over the areas 
you want to select, and it expands to 
select the area (kind of like a much 
smarter version of the Magic Wand 
tool, but using different technology). 
One thing I've learned about this tool 
is it actually seems to work best when 
you use it quickly — really zoom over 
your subject with the tool and it does 
a pretty decent job. Here, I selected 
the subject, and while you can see some 
problems with the selection (the area of 
gray between her arm on the left and 
her shirt), it's not that bad overall. If it 
selects too much, press-and-hold the 
Option (PC: Alt) key and paint over that 
accidentally selected area to remove it 
from your selection. Don't worry — it's 
not going to look perfect at this point. 

(Continued) 



Fixing Common Problems 



Chapter 8 



231 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Three: 

Now, here's something else I've learned 
about the Quick Selection tool: while it's 
pretty good at selecting, it's not nearly 
as good at deselecting areas that you 
don't want selected (like that gray area 
between her arm and her shirt). I've found 
that when it misses areas like that, you're 
honestly better off switching to the Magic 
Wand tool (Shift-W), pressing-and-hold- 
ing the Option (PC: Alt) key, and just 
clicking once in that area to instantly de- 
select it. So, let's go ahead and do that 
under her arm, and you'll see that in just 
that one click with the Magic Wand tool, 
that area is deselected (as shown here). 



Step Four: 

Okay, here comes a very important part 
of this stage of the process, and that is 
making sure that when you select her hair, 
you don't select any background area with 
it. In other words, don't let there be any 
hair selected with gray background show- 
ing through. In fact, I basically follow the 
rule that I don't get too close to the out- 
side edges of my subject's hair unless 
an area is pretty flat (in other words, no 
flyaway, tough-to-select hair in that area). 
You can see what I mean in the close-up 
here, where I avoided the thinner edges 
of her hair (we'll let Photoshop select 
those hard parts — we'll just get close 
to the edge then stop). Also, you can 
see where I stopped before some areas 
where the hair is finer. Again, we'll let 
Photoshop grab those parts later, but for 
now we're most concerned with avoiding 
selecting areas where you can see gray 
background through her hair. If you ac- 
cidentally select an area with gaps, then 
it's okay to switch back to the Quick Sel- 
ection tool, press-and-hold the Option 
(PC: Alt) key, and paint over those gap 
areas to deselect them. 



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► 232 



Chapter 8 



Fixing Common Problems 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



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Step Five: 

Once your selection looks pretty decent, 
it's time to unlock the real selection power 
(the Quick Selection tool is just the warm- 
up act). Go up to the Options Bar and 
click on the Refine Edge button (shown 
circled here). This is where the magic hap- 
pens. In the Refine Edge dialog, you have 
a number of choices for how you can view 
your selected image (including just the 
standard old marching ants), but just for 
now, as part of our learning process, go 
ahead and choose Black & White, from 
the View pop-up menu. This shows your 
selection as a standard layer mask. As you 
can see, the Quick Selection tool, by itself, 
isn't gettin' the job done (the edges are 
jaggy and harsh, and there's no wispy hair 
selected at all). That's okay, though, be- 
cause we're just gettin' started. 



Step Six: 

Next, turn on the Smart Radius check- 
box (you won't see anything happen yet, 
but turn it on anyway). Smart Radius is 
the edge technology that knows the dif- 
ference between a soft edge and a hard 
edge, so it can make a mask that includes 
both. This checkbox is so important that 
I leave it on all the time (if you want it al- 
ways on, as well, just turn it on and then 
turn on the Remember Settings check- 
box at the bottom of the dialog). Now, 
again, just for learning purposes, drag the 
Radius slider all the way over the right (to 
250), and all of her hair gets selected in- 
stantly (pretty amazing isn't it?). While it 
did a great job on her hair, there are parts 
of her (like her right arm) that are being 
"over-selected." Those areas will wind up 
being transparent, and you don't want 
that, so we always have to back it way 
down. But, I just wanted you to see the 
incredible math at work. 

(Continued) 



Fixing Common Problems 



Chapter 8 



233 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Seven: 

Okay, let's drag that Radius slider back 
down until her arm on the right looks 
more solid white. Here's how this works: 
We want our subject to be solid white 
and we want the background to be solid 
black. Anything that appears in gray will 
be semi-transparent. That's okay if this 
happens in her hair in wispy areas, but 
it's not good on her arms or clothes or 
anything that's supposed to have a well- 
defined hard edge. Otherwise, we'd 
leave the Radius up at 250 and be done 
with it. But, there's more to most por- 
traits than just hair, so we have to keep 
those other areas pretty much intact, 
too. Here, I rolled back the Radius to 
around 47, but you might be able to 
bring it up a bit more, maybe to some- 
where in the mid-50s. By the way, for 
simple selections, leave the Radius 
amount down low. When you have a 
tricky selection, like fine hair blowing 
in the wind, you'll have to increase it. 
So, just remember: trickier selections 
mean higher Radius amounts. 



Step Eight: 

Now, let's change the View to Overlay 
to see if there are any areas we missed. 
The parts that are selected appear in 
full-color, and the parts that aren't ap- 
pear in red. If you see the background 
color showing through (in our case, gray), 
you've got a problem (and we do here, 
on the left side). You need to tell Photo- 
shop exactly where the problem areas are, 
so it can better define those areas. You 
do that with the Refine Radius tool (E; 
shown circled here). It's active by default, 
so just take your cursor and simply paint 
over the areas where you see the back- 
ground peeking through (as shown here), 
and it redefines those areas. This is what 
picks up that fine hair detail. 



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► 234 



Chapter 8 



Fixing Common Problems 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



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Step Nine: 

As you look around her hair, if you see 
parts of it that are tinted red, those parts 
aren't selected. So, just paint a stroke or 
two over those areas (like I'm doing here), 
and they become full-color (letting you 
know they're added to your selection) 
as Photoshop refines those edge areas 
where you're painting. It'll look like it's 
painting in white sometimes, but when 
you're done, it just redefines the area and 
tells Photoshop that this area needs some 
work, and it "redoes" its thing. Here, I've 
gone over some areas that were tinted 
red on the left side of her hair, and on the 
right side, too, and you can see those 
areas are now appearing in color. I also 
increased the Radius amount a bit. 



Step 10: 

I recommend avoiding the Adjust Edge 
section sliders in the center of the dia- 
log altogether, because you'll spend too 
much time fussing with them, trying to 
make them work. (I figure you want me 
to tell you when to avoid stuff, too.) Down 
at the bottom of the dialog, there's a 
Decontaminate Colors checkbox, which 
basically desaturates the edge pixels a 
bit. So, when you place this image on 
a different background, the edge color 
doesn't give you away. Just below that, 
you get to choose what the result of all 
this will be: will your selected subject be 
sent over to a new blank document, or 
just a new layer in this document, or a new 
layer with a layer mask already attached, 
etc.? I always choose to make a new layer 
with a layer mask in the same document. 
That way, I can just grab the Brush tool 
and fix any areas that might have dropped 
out, which we're probably going to have 
to do next, so choose New Layer with 
Layer Mask and click OK. 

(Continued) 



Fixing Common Problems 



Chapter 8 



235 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step 11: 

When you click OK, your image will now 
appear on a transparent layer (as seen 
here) and if you look in the Layers panel, 
you'll see a new layer with a layer mask 
attached (just what you asked for). You 
can also see it does a pretty amazing job. 
It won't get every little thin, wispy hair 
strand, but it gets most of the important 
ones. Also, I've got a trick or two coming 
up that will help a bit more, but first, let's 
do a quick check of that mask and fine- 
tune it just a bit before we put her over a 
different background (that's right, baby, 
we're doing some compositing!). Press- 
and-hold the Option (PC: Alt) key and 
click directly on that layer mask thumbnail 
in the Layers panel to see just the mask 
(you can see it in the next step). 



Step 12: 

Now, zoom in tight near the bottom of 
her arm on the right, and you can see 
some areas that aren't solid white (which 
means these areas will be semi-trans- 
parent and that's not what you want for 
her arm). So, get the Brush tool (B) and, 
with your Foreground color set to white, 
choose a small, hard-edged brush from 
the Brush Picker in the Options Bar, and 
then paint along that edge, right over 
the grayish area, to make it solid white. 
You can see some areas on the inside of 
her legs here that need a cleanup, as well. 
Next, press X to switch your Foreground 
color to black to clean up that mess on 
the right side of her leg where the white 
has spilled over onto the black. That 
should be solid black in the background 
areas. For a little help cleaning up tricky 
areas, switch your Brush's blend Mode to 
Overlay. That way, when you're painting 
with white, it automatically avoids paint- 
ing over the color black (and vice versa). 



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► 236 



Chapter 8 



Fixing Common Problems 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



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Step 13: 

At this point, we're done with our mask, 
so you can apply it permanently to your 
image by clicking directly on the layer 
mask thumbnail (in the Layers panel) 
and dragging it onto the Trash icon at 
the bottom of the panel (as shown here) 
to delete it. When you do this, a warn- 
ing dialog pops up asking if you want to 
"Apply mask to layer before removing?" 
You want to click Apply, and the mask- 
ing you did is now applied to the layer 
(and the layer mask thumbnail is deleted). 
This just makes things a little easier from 
here on out. 



Step 14: 

Next, open the background image you 
want to use in your composite. Get the 
Move tool (V), then drag-and-drop your 
subject right onto this background image 
(as shown here). {Note: This is easier if 
you have the Application Frame turned 
off and can see at least part of both im- 
ages on your screen. If you have it turned 
on, so you can't see both images at once, 
just click-and-drag the subject image up 
to the tab of the background image and 
hover there for a moment or two until 
it lets you drop the image on the back- 
ground. If all else fails, copy-and-paste it 
onto this background; it will appear on its 
own layer.) Now, you see our next chal- 
lenge here? Her color tone makes it look 
like she wasn't photographed in these sur- 
roundings (plus, she has a tiny white fringe 
around her outside edge, which is a dead 
giveaway that this is a composite). 



(Continued) 



Fixing Common Problems Chapter 8 237 i 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step 15: 

First, let's get rid of that thin white fringe 
around her, then we'll deal with our color 
issue. To remove the fringe, go under the 
Layer menu, under Matting (it's at the 
very bottom of the menu), and choose 
Defringe. When the Defringe dialog ap- 
pears (shown here), enter 1 (use 2 pixels 
for a higher-megapixel image), click OK, 
and that fringe is gone! (Photoshop basi- 
cally replaces the outside edge pixels with 
a new set of pixels that is a combination 
of the background its sitting on and your 
subject's edge, so the fringe goes away.) 



Step 16: 

Here's a trick I stumbled upon years ago 
when making composites (back when 
we used channels for stuff like this). This 
trick gives you more detail and brings 
back some of those lost wisps of hair by 
building up some pixels. It's going to 
sound really simple and it is. Just press 
Command-J (PC: Ctrl-J) to duplicate your 
layer (the one with your subject). That's 
it. Just duplicate your subject layer, and 
it has a "building up" effect around the 
edges of her. Suddenly, it looks more de- 
fined, and it fills in some of the weaker 
wispy areas. If for any reason it looks like 
too much, at the top of the Layers panel, 
just lower the Opacity of this duplicate 
layer until it looks right (here, I lowered 
it to 50% and it looks about right). Next, 
merge this duplicate layer with your origi- 
nal subject layer by pressing Command-E 
(PC: Ctrl-E). Okay, now to tackle the 
fact that the color of our subject doesn't 
match the surroundings she was sup- 
posedly shot in. 



™_© Factory Background.jpg @ 100% (Background copy, RC8/S) * 





► 238 



Chapter 8 



Fixing Common Problems 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



= 





Step 17: 

We need a selection around our subject 
layer again, so Command-click (PC: Ctrl- 
click) on your subject layer's thumbnail to 
load it as a selection. Once the selection 
is in place (as seen here), add a new blank 
layer by clicking on the Create a New 
Layer icon at the bottom of the Layers 
panel. Now, look at your image and ask 
yourself, "Which color really stands out 
to me in this background?" Here, I see 
purple, brown (on the floor), and gray (in 
some parts of the ceiling), but the color 
that's really jumping out to me is green. 
So, get the Eyedropper tool (I) from the 
Toolbox and click it once on an area of 
green in the photo to make that exact 
green your Foreground color (as shown 
here, where I'm clicking near the ceiling). 



Step 18: 

Now, fill the selection (on your empty 
layer) with this green color by pressing 
Option-Delete (PC: Alt-Backspace). 
Then, deselect by pressing Command-D 
(PC: Ctrl-D). 



(Continued) 



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for Digital Photographers 



Step 19: 

To make this green area blend in: 

(1) change the layer's blend mode from 
Normal to Color (so just the color shows 
through, instead of being solid). Then, 

(2) lower the Opacity to the point where 
you see the color image start to emerge, 
but it has enough of the green tint to 
it that it really looks like she was photo- 
graphed there on location (at least color- 
wise, anyway). For this image, I lowered 
the Opacity of the green layer to 35%, 
which ties the color of the two together 
(as seen here, where her overall color is 
more muted, like the background colors, 
but with a hint of that green). Now, press 
Command-E (PC: Ctrl-E) once more to 
merge this green layer with the subject's 
layer below it. The last step is to unify her 
tonally with the background. 



Step 20: 

In this case, our background is a multi- 
exposure HDR, so we need to add a high- 
contrast effect to her to match the back- 
ground (if the background wasn't an HDR, 
I'd apply the effect to the background 
first, then to her). This is a multi-step pro- 
cess, so jump to page 272 in the special 
effects chapter to see how this is done, 
or if you already learned it, you can fol- 
low this shorthand version: Duplicate the 
subject layer, change the blend mode to 
Vivid Light, and then Invert by pressing 
Command-I (PC: Ctrl-I). Now, apply the 
Surface Blur filter set at a Radius of 40 and 
a Threshold of 40. Hide the Background 
layer (click on its Eye icon), then press 
Command-Option-Shift-E (PC: Ctrl-Alt- 
Shift-E) to create a merged layer on top of 
your layer stack. Press Command-Shift-U 
(PC: Ctrl-Shift-U) to desaturate it. Delete 
the middle layer (Background copy 2), then 
change the blend mode of the top layer 
to Overlay (as seen here). Lastly, make the 
Background layer visible again, flatten the 
image, then go to the Lens Correction 
filter and add a dark edge vignette. 





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How's that one for a title? Well, that's the best explanation of what happens 

sometimes when you shoot really wide, and in Photoshop CS6, there's a 

tool called Adaptive Wide Angle that was invented for these situations. 

However, there are three things you need to know about this filter: (1) you're 

not going to use it very often, (2) you're either going to have to crop pretty 

massively after using it or use Content-Aware Fill to fill in the gaps, 

and (3) it actually does a pretty darn good job when you do need it. 



Fixing Really 
Messed Up 
Wide-Angle Shots 



Type Select 



3D View Window 





Step One: 

Open the photo that has a serious lens 
issue you want to fix. I personally don't 
use smart filters a bunch, because once 
I apply a filter, I'm usually pretty much 
done with it. But, in this case, it's not a 
bad idea to first go under the Filter menu 
and choose Convert for Smart Filters, 
and then choose Adaptive Wide Angle 
from that same menu. The reason why 
this might come in handy is that, depend- 
ing on the image, you may need to come 
back and tweak your existing filter set- 
tings (well, it's been the case for me 
anyway), and by making it a smart filter, 
you can apply the filter, and then re- 
open it with all the Constraint lines 
still in place, so you can tweak them 
(this will all make more sense in just 
a minute). 



Step Two: 

When the Adaptive Wide Angle dialog 
opens (shown here), it reads the lens 
data embedded into the photo by your 
camera (see the bottom-left corner of 
the dialog), and it tries to apply an Auto 
correction. Sometimes it does a pretty 
good job, but in this case, you can see 
the monument is still really bent, so we'll 
have to help the filter out. If you know 
the image is a fisheye, or if you just want 
to try to fix perspective, choose either 
from the Correction pop-up menu in 
the top right to give you a better start- 
ing point. 

(Continued) 



Fixing Common Problems 



Chapter 8 



241 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Three: 

We help the filter do its thing by letting 
it know which parts of the image need 
to be fixed, and we do that using the 
Constraint tool (it's the default tool and 
the first one in the toolbar in the top left). 
Basically, you click at the base of the 
object you want straightened (like the 
column on the right side here), and then 
as you move your cursor up toward the 
top of the object, the green line you're 
dragging literally bends (it does this auto- 
matically, because it knows the lens you 
used and what kind of problems you're 
dealing with). You get a zoomed-in close- 
up of where your cursor is currently lo- 
cated in the Detail preview on the right 
side of the dialog (as seen here), which is 
really handy for situations like this where 
you want the end of your line to be right 
along an edge (see how it's off a bit in 
the Detail preview?). Note: If you mess up, 
you can delete a Constraint line by just 
press-and-holding the Option (PC: Alt) 
key, clicking once on it, and it's gone. 



Step Four: 

Once you click your mouse near the top 
of the column (like I did here), it straight- 
ens that column. It also gives you a pre- 
view of the cropping work that you'll 
need to do pretty shortly (either that, 
or Content-Aware Fill, but you can see 
how it's having to the warp the image 
around to pull this straightening trick off). 
Also, if part of the top or bottom of the 
column still looks bent after adding the 
Constraint line, you can grab the end of 
the line near where the problem is and 
literally just drag it out longer. That will 
usually get rid of the problem, even if 
you have to drag it off the image area. 
If you do, you can move your image over 
in the preview window, so you can reach 
that end handle if you need to tweak it 
again, by switching to the Adaptive Wide 
Angle's own Move tool (it's the third tool 
down in the toolbar). 





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Step Five: 

So, that's the basic plan: you take the 
Constraint tool and drag it over parts 
of your image that need to be straight- 
ened and it does its thing. Now, see 
how the top of the monument is arched 
(well, look back at it in Step Four)? Just 
drag a new Constraint line across the 
top of the monument from left to right 
to straighten it (as seen here). Just know 
that you'll usually have to do this more 
than once (in this case, you'll have to do 
just about every column individually to 
get things looking decent). Also, while 
we're here, when you lay down one of 
these Constraint lines, you'll see a round 
circle with two round handles appear 
with it. That lets you fine-tune the angle 
of that line after you've laid it down. So, 
if it's off a little (or a lot), you can grab 
one of those round handles and literally 
rotate the circle in a clockwise (or counter- 
clockwise) motion to change the angle 
of the fix. As you do this, a little pop-up 
appears giving you a readout with the 
amount of rotation (in degrees, as seen 
here on the bottom left). Once you let 
go, it readjusts the fix based on how 
much you rotated (as seen here on the 
bottom right). 



Step Six: 

After tracing the inner and outer edges 
of the column on the left and the black 
column on the right (as seen here), for a 
total of five Constraint lines (four on the 
columns and one across the top), the 
image looks pretty good. So, go ahead 
and click OK to apply your changes. 

(Continued) 



Fixing Common Problems 



Chapter 8 



243 < 



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Step Seven: 

Now, remember, if you click OK and 
something doesn't look quite right, and 
you converted this image for smart filters 
before you opened the filter itself (see 
Step One), then you can go to the Layers 
panel and double-click directly on the 
words "Adaptive Wide Angle" (as shown 
here). This will reopen the Adaptive Wide 
Angle dialog with all your Constraint lines 
still in place, so you can tweak them, 
rather than starting over from scratch. 



Step Eight: 

Once you click OK, you'll see all the 
gaps that will need to be cropped away, 
so get the Crop tool (C) and click-and- 
drag in the corner and side handles until 
most of the gaps are cropped away (all 
that grayed out area outside the cropping 
border here will be cropped away, and 
you can see it's a pretty good amount). 
Press Return (PC: Enter) to crop your 
image, then go ahead and choose Flat- 
ten Image from the Layers panel's flyout 
menu to flatten it. 





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Step Nine: 

Now, you're still going to have some 
gaps, so get the Magic Wand tool (press 
Shift-W until you have it). Click it in one 
of those gaps (like the one at the top 
right), and once that area is selected, 
press-and-hold the Shift key and click in 
the other gap areas. Then, go under the 
Select menu, under Modify, and choose 
Expand. Enter 4 pixels and click OK (as 
shown here) to grow your selection out 
a bit (this helps Content-Aware Fill do 
a better job). 



Step 10: 

Next, go under the Edit menu, and 
choose Fill. From the Use pop-up menu, 
choose Content-Aware, then click OK 
to have it fill in those areas. Press Com- 
mand-D (PC: Ctrl-D) to deselect. Below 
is a before and after (I'm showing this now, 
because we need to open a different 
image to show the rest of the Adaptive 
Wide Angle tools). 




Before 



After 



(Continued) 



Fixing Common Problems Chapter 8 245 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step 11: 

If you have an image where you know 
that a part of it is supposed to be abso- 
lutely level and flat (like a horizon line or, 
in this case, the floor of the basketball 
court), then before you drag out your 
Constraint line, press-and-hold the Shift 
key. Your line will turn yellow, and you'll 
drag it out like usual along the curved 
edge of the court (as shown here). 

TIP: If Your Constraint 
Lines Don't Bend 

If Photoshop recognized your lens and 
has a profile for it, then the lines will bend 
automatically. But, if it doesn't recognize 
your lens, then there's no lens profile for 
it to work from (if you choose Auto correc- 
tion, a warning dialog will appear telling 
you that no matching lens profile was 
found), and it's then up to you to make 
the bend manually. Just click the Con- 
straint tool on one end of what you want 
to fix, then click it again on the other end 
to complete your straight line. Then, click 
on the center point within the circle and 
bend the line so it fits. 

Step 12: 

Here's the result of our Shift-clicking: the 
floor is straight and flat. Well, most of it is. 
Take a look at the far-right side of it. See 
how it bends up? To fix that, just click- 
and-drag the point on the right end of 
the line out to the right. You'll see the line 
automatically bend up along the floor and 
then when you release your mouse but- 
ton, it will immediately straighten it out, 
as seen here at the bottom (that's pretty 
amazing when you think about it). 

TIP: Straightening Rectangles 

If you need to quickly fix something 
like a doorway or window (a rectangle), 
then use the Polygon Constraint tool 
(the second tool down in the toolbar), 
which works like the Polygonal Lasso 
tool — just trace around your rectangle 
and it straightens it. 



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Step 13: 

Now, let's fix that row of championship 
banners across the top of the image by 
Shift-clicking a Constraint line across 
the bottom of them. This immediately 
straightens those out, as well. Again, we 
do the Shift-click thing when we know 
something should be either perfectly 
horizontal or perfectly vertical. 

TIP: Making a Curved Line Straight 

Once you have a curved line in place, if 
you decide you want it to be a perfectly 
straight line (a flat horizontal or vertical 
line), just Right-click on the line and a 
pop-up menu will appear where you 
can choose the type of line you want 
to convert it to. 



Step 14: 

Now, just click OK and flatten your 
image (because it's a Smart Filter layer). 
Then, get the Crop tool and crop the 
image down, so you don't see those 
gaps along the edges (as shown here, 
where I cropped tight enough that 
I didn't have to deal with the edges 
at all). A before/after is shown below. 




Before 



After 



Fixing Common Problems 



Chapter 8 



247 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Fixing Problems 

Caused by Your 

Camera's Lens 



Photoshop definitely has some overlap with the included Camera Raw 7 
that comes with CS6 (and is part of Photoshop), in that you can do a lot of the 
same things in Photoshop that you can do in Camera Raw. If you shoot in RAW 
mode on your camera, you're better off doing things like lens corrections right 
within Camera Raw (see Chapter 3), because it's faster and does less harm to 
your pixels. However, if for whatever reason, you don't want to use Camera Raw's 
Lens Corrections panel (it works for JPEGs and TIFFs, too. Hint, hint), then 
you can use the Lens Correction filter in CS6. 



Step One: 

Here's a problem image. Look at the 
columns on either side, which are bow- 
ing outward. Luckily, we've got a filter for 
that. Go under the Filter menu and, right 
near the top, choose Lens Correction. 



Step Two: 

When the Lens Correction dialog opens, 
you'll see two tabs in the top right: Auto 
Correction and Custom (Custom means 
"do-it-yourself"). I always try Auto Correc- 
tion first, because if it can find a profile 
for your lens in its database of lenses, it 
will pretty much fix the problem for you 
instantly (it looks at the embedded lens 
data in your image, then searches its inter- 
nal database for a built-in profile based on 
your camera make and model, and lens 
type). In the Auto Correction tab, turn on 
the Geometric Distortion checkbox and, 
as you can see here, it found a lens profile 
for my lens and did a pretty darn good 
job of removing that bowing from the 
columns. If you're seeing any lens vignet- 
ting (darkening of the corners in your 
image), then also turn on the Vignette 
checkbox and it will fix that at the same 
time automatically. 



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Step Three: 

Now, what if it doesn't instantly come 
up with a profile (or the camera data is 
missing from the file) when you turn on 
Geometric Distortion? In that case, you 
can sometimes help it along by choosing 
your camera's make, model, and even 
lens from the pop-up menus in the Search 
Criteria section. In this case, they didn't 
actually have my camera model listed in 
the Camera Model pop-up menu, and 
even when I chose the lens I did use, here, 
the Auto Correction doesn't look right. 
This is why this works best if it can match 
it to a profile in its database automatically, 
rather than having you choose it here. 
However, sometimes this works great. 
If you don't see the exact lens model, 
I usually try the next closet profile, and 
that will often do the trick. 



Step Four: 

If, after choosing your camera make 
and model, no profiles show up in the 
Lens Profiles listing box, try clicking the 
Search Online button (as shown here). 
It will go to Adobe's own servers, and 
check to see if any additional profiles for 
your camera make and model have been 
added by end users (as long as you're 
connected to the Internet, of course). If 
it does find some, they'll be listed there, 
and all you have to do is click on one to 
apply it. In this case, it didn't find any 
additional profiles for my lens, so it re- 
verted back to the original profile it first 
provided (which actually looks pretty 
good). Although it did a pretty good job 
of fixing the barrel distortion (the bow- 
ing out of the columns), there's still kind 
of a perspective problem (look at how the 
columns are leaning out to the left and 
right — smaller at the bottom and leaning 
outward as you get to the top). 

(Continued) 



Fixing Common Problems 



Chapter 8 



249 < 



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for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

This bending outward has to be fixed 
manually, so click on the Custom tab. 
Anything you do in this Custom tab is 
added to any corrections you already 
applied in the Auto Correction tab, so 
you don't lose what it already did for you. 
At the top, you'll see a slider for fixing 
problems like the bowing columns, but 
since the Auto Correction already fixed 
that, we'll go down near the bottom of 
the dialog to the Transform section. The 
little icons on the left and right of the slid- 
ers give you a good idea of what they do. 
We need to fix the perspective (they're 
wider apart at the top than the bottom), 
so drag the Vertical Perspective slider to 
the right until they look pretty much even 
at the top and bottom (for this image, 
I dragged over to +7 and it looked about 
right). A before and after appears below. 
Okay, ready for a more challenging fix 
(meaning, no Auto Correction at all)? 





Before (bowing columns and 
a perspective problem) 



After 



► 250 Chapter 8 Fixing Common Problems 



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Step Six: 

This image has all sorts of lens night- 
mares going on. First, the buildings look 
like they're leaning in toward each other. 
Secondly, there's a geometric distortion 
problem here (the buildings are bowing 
outward), as well, and lastly, the image 
is a little crooked. We can fix all of these 
in the Custom tab. Let's start by turning 
off Auto Correction (turn off the Geo- 
metric Distortion checkbox in the Auto 
Correction tab, as shown here). 

TIP: It's Auto-Cropping 
Behind the Scenes 

When you make geometric distortion 
corrections like this, you'll see that it 
seems to crop in a little bit tighter on your 
photo. That's because it does. What it's 
doing is automatically correcting for the 
fact that when it unbowed your image, it 
had to bow the outside edges a bit (leav- 
ing big gaps on the edges), so it automati- 
cally scales up the image a little to crop 
off those messed-up edges. If you want 
to see what's really going on, drag the 
Scale slider (at the bottom of the dialog) 
to anything less than 100%, and you'll 
see the edges. 



Step Seven: 

Now, let's get the buildings straight, 
so they don't fall over into the road. Go 
down to the Transform section, but this 
time you'll need to drag the Vertical Per- 
spective slider to the left (the perspective 
problem is the opposite of what it was 
with the columns — these buildings are 
leaning inward). So, drag it over until the 
buildings look straighter (as shown here). 
I dragged over to -14, which gets the 
fronts of the buildings looking good, but 
the right side of the building on the left 
still looks a little off. If I drag any farther, 
though, the rest of the image starts to 
lean, so we should stop about there. 

(Continued) 



Fixing Common Problems 



Chapter 8 



251 4 



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for Digital Photographers 



Step Eight: 

There's only some minor bowing (barrel 
distortion), but it doesn't appear that obvi- 
ous. So, drag the Remove Distortion slider 
to the right to +3.00 (as seen here), and 
now that it's gone, it'll be more obvious 
(drag it back and forth a couple of times 
and you'll see it). The last tweak is to go 
back down to the Transform section, to 
the Angle control. While you can drag the 
little line around the circle, it's very sen- 
sitive. So much so, that I wouldn't use it 
(go ahead and try it, then press Com- 
mand-Z [PC: Ctrl-Z] to Undo). Instead, 
click your cursor in the Angle field. You 
can use the Up/Down Arrow keys on 
your keyboard to change it, however, 
it's very precise (moving in tenths of a 
degree), so to speed things up, press- 
and-hold the Shift key while you use the 
Arrow keys and it'll move in larger in- 
crements. Slowly rotate it until you feel 
like it's straight (I felt like it was around 
+0.70°, as shown here). 





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The first of the Content-Aware features we'll cover comes in handy when you 
need to resize just part of your image without totally trashing the main subject of it. 
This is great when you have to make your image fit into a document size that doesn't 
match the aspect ratio of a digital camera image (for example, like when you add a 
still image to a video slide show). That's when Content-Aware Scale rocks, because it's 
"aware" of the important part of the image, and so it only stretches the non-important 
parts (and if it's not quite sure, you can help it out). It's like an "intelligent" resizer. 



Stretching Stuff to 
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Step One: 

Here are the two documents we're 
going to work with. The first is our 
digital camera photo, and the second 
is a blank document that's more like 
the widescreen aspect ratio of video. 



(Continued) 



Fixing Common Problems Chapter 8 253 < 



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for Digital Photographers 



Step Two: 

Get the Move tool (V) and click-and-drag 
your photo into the widescreen document. 
To shrink your image down so it fits fully 
inside the document, press Command-T 
(PC: Ctrl-T) to bring up Free Transform (if 
you can't reach the Free Transform han- 
dles, press Command-0 [zero; PC: Ctrl- 
0], and the image window will expand 
enough so you can reach all the handles). 
Press-and-hold the Shift key, click on a cor- 
ner handle, and drag to resize your image. 
When you get it so it fits fully inside the 
document (as seen here), press the Return 
(PC: Enter) key to lock in your resizing. 
You can see the problem, here: to get it to 
fit, without cropping, leaves white gaps to 
the left and right of your image. 



Step Three: 

Now, you could just bring up Free Trans- 
form again, drag the left side handle over 
so it covers the gap on the left side, and 
then do the same thing to stretch the 
image over to the right side (as shown 
here), but that stretches our subject out 
and her body is now thicker and distor- 
ted (take a look back at the image in 
Step Two and you'll see how much wider 
she looks here). This will not win you any 
fans (or repeat business), so don't hit the 
Return key to lock in your transformation. 
Instead, hit the Esc key to cancel your 
transformation. Then, go under the Edit 
menu and choose Content-Aware Scale. 




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ST 



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Step Four: 

Choosing this brings up what looks 
just like the Free Transform handles 
(but these have "special powers"). Now, 
do the same thing you just did in Step 
Three — drag the left side handle over 
to cover the gap on the left, and then 
do the same thing on the right side (as 
shown here). It knows where your sub- 
ject is (and that it's the most important 
part), so it only stretches the back- 
ground (parts that can be scaled), and 
not her (which should not be scaled). 
It also expands the area it stretches in 
a very smart way, so the image doesn't 
look like it has been stretched. If you're 
using this on a different image, and it 
doesn't recognize that there's a person 
in your photo, click the Protect Skin 
Tones button up in the Options Bar 
(shown circled here), and that will alert 
Photoshop that there's a person in the 
image that it should avoid stretching. 
Of course, it can still get confused and 
miss that there's a person (or object) 
that you don't want stretched, which is 
why you'll want to know this next trick. 



Step Five: 

Before we go on to that, you'll want 
to know that you can also use this to 
shrink the width of the photo without 
distorting your subject (it'll slide her over, 
but it won't distort her, which is pretty 
amazing — maybe more amazing than the 
stretching). You do it the same way: just 
go into Content-Aware Scale and click- 
and-drag the side handles inward, and the 
scene just kind of collapses in around her, 
but she stays intact (as seen here). Notice 
how the windows are now closer together, 
but even they don't look squished? Pretty 
amazing, eh? Okay, now on to how to pro- 
tect your subject when Photoshop doesn't 
recognize which part of the photo is the 
important part. 



(Continued) 



Fixing Common Problems Chapter 8 255 < 



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for Digital Photographers 



Step Six: 

Let's open up a different image (shown 
here) and drag it over into our main 
document (you can click-and-drag the 
layer for the previous image onto the 
Trash icon at the bottom of the Layers 
panel to get rid of it). Press Command-T 
(PC: Ctrl-T) to go into Free Transform 
again and resize the image to fit in the 
document. Then, let's go ahead and use 
Content-Aware Scale again to shrink her 
down, so you can see what happens when 
Photoshop, for whatever reason, doesn't 
recognize our subject. Grab the side han- 
dles and drag way in toward our subject, 
and you can see it totally squishes her (as 
seen here at the bottom). Luckily, we can 
fix this easier than you'd think. 



1 CantEiUlUrjh Ijpq .. ]h , ■ 





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Save SeJection 



- Destination 



Document: [ Untitled- 1 



Channel: [ New 
Name: | 






(_ Cancel ) 



Operation — 
New Channel 

'._, Add to Channel 

Subtract from Channel 

Q Intersect with Channel 




Step Seven: 

The trick is simple: make a selection of the 
subject you want to protect (in our case, 
the woman), save that selection, then tell 
Photoshop you've saved it, and it then 
avoids that selected area like the plague. 
So, start by getting whichever selection 
tool you're most comfortable with from 
the Toolbox, and put a selection around 
your subject (here I used the Quick Selec- 
tion tool, which if anything, is quick. It's 
not the most accurate, but that's okay for 
what we need to do here). Once your se- 
lection is in place, go under the Select 
menu and choose Save Selection. When 
the Save Selection dialog appears, just 
click OK, and now you can deselect by 
pressing Command-D (PC: Ctrl-D). 



Step Eight: 

Next, go under the Edit menu and 
choose Content-Aware Scale. All you 
have to do now is tell Photoshop that 
you have a saved selection (called an 
Alpha channel). To the left of the Pro- 
tect Skin Tones button up in the Options 
Bar, you'll see a Protect pop-up menu. 
From that menu, choose Alpha 1 (your 
saved selection), and now Content-Aware 
Scale knows exactly what not to stretch. 
So, grab the side handles, drag way in, 
and you'll notice that it keeps our subject 
intact and squishes the background in 
around her instead. 



Fixing Common Problems 



Chapter 8 



257 < 



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for Digital Photographers 



Removing Stuff 
Using Content- 
Aware Fill 



When people talk about "Photoshop magic," Content-Aware Fill is one of those 
things they're talking about. Even after using this feature for a couple of years now 
to get rid of distracting things in my images, it still amazes me more often than 
not with the incredible job it does. The fact that it's incredibly easy to use at the 
same time really makes it a powerful, and indispensable, tool for photographers. 



Step One: 

Here, we have a tourist crossing into the 
background scene from the far-left side 
of the image, and it distracts from our 
subject (the woman sweeping), so ideally 
we'd like him out of the shot. 



Step Two: 

To have Content-Aware Fill remove him, 
just get the Lasso tool (L), or whichever 
selection tool you're most comfortable 
with (like the Quick Selection tool, Pen 
tool — whatever), and draw a selection 
around him. Once your selection is in 
place, you can help Content-Aware Fill 
do its thing by expanding that selec- 
tion outward by 4 or so pixels. So, go 
under the Select menu, under Modify, 
and choose Expand. When the Expand 
Selection dialog appears (shown here), 
enter 4 pixels, click OK, and your selec- 
tion grows outward by that much. 



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: 




" man ■• i h..; iflO SF-yHtt 




Step Three: 

Next, go under the Edit menu and choose 
Fill. When the Fill dialog appears, choose 
Content-Aware from the Use pop-up 
menu (as seen here). Now, just click OK, 
sit back, and prepare to be amazed (I 
know — it's freaky). Not only is the guy 
gone, but it also patched the wall pretty 
darn perfectly behind him (that's why it's 
called "Content-Aware" Fill. It's aware of 
what is around the object you're removing, 
and it does an intelligent filling in of what 
would normally just be a big white hole in 
your image). Go ahead and deselect by 
pressing Command-D (PC: Ctrl-D). The 
more I use it, the more it amazes me, but 
part of using this effectively is learning its 
weaknesses, and how to get around them 
when possible. 



Step Four: 

One area it didn't fill perfectly is the top 
of the stone cylinder his leg was behind, 
so we'll have to fix that manually using 
the Clone Stamp tool. Get the Clone 
Stamp tool (S) from the Toolbox, Option- 
click (PC: Alt-click) above the top edge 
of the cylinder and paint over the top 
right of it to fix that spillover (as seen here 
at the top). Now, you will fall deeply in 
love with Content-Aware Fill if you can 
come to peace with the fact that it won't 
work perfectly every time. But, if it does 
70% or 80% of the work for me (in remov- 
ing something I don't want), that means 
I only have to do the other 20% (or maybe 
3%, like in this case), and that makes it 
worth its weight in gold. If it does the en- 
tire job for me, and sometimes it surely 
does, then it's even better, right? Right. 
Also, it helps to know that the more 
random the background is behind the 
object you want to remove, the better 
job Content-Aware Fill generally does 
for you. 



(Continued) 



Fixing Common Problems Chapter 8 259< 



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for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

Content-Aware Fill is pretty amazing 
when it works, but like any other tool in 
Photoshop, it doesn't work 100% of the 
time on every single type of photo and 
every situation. When I use Content- 
Aware Fill, I usually wind up using the 
Spot Healing Brush along with it, be- 
cause it has Content-Aware healing built 
in. In Photoshop CS6, the Patch tool (the 
Healing Brush's cousin that works better 
for removing large objects) also has Con- 
tent-Aware capabilities now. Let's open 
another image (this motocross shot) and 
use all of these tools together to remove 
the rider in the background, along with all 
the power lines, light poles, and the signs 
in the lower-left side of the image. 



Step Six: 

A lot of times you don't have to do as 
accurate a selection as we just did when 
removing the tourist in the previous proj- 
ect. For the rider in the background, just 
take the regular ol' Lasso tool (L), draw a 
loose selection around him and his bike 
(as shown here), then go under the Edit 
menu and choose Fill. When the Fill dia- 
log comes up, make sure Content-Aware 
is selected in the Use pop-up menu, then 
click OK, and press Command-D (PC: 
Ctrl-D) to deselect (you'll see in the next 
step that the rider and his bike are gone, 
and it did a great job of filling in the trees 
and dirt hill behind him). 




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Custom Pattern: 



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Step Seven: 

Take a look at where the second rider 
used to be. He's outtathere! Let's switch 
to the Spot Healing Brush tool (J) for 
the light poles on the left. You literally 
just make your brush size a little bigger 
than a pole, paint over it, and Photoshop 
uses the Content-Aware technology to 
remove it. I removed the one under his 
wheel first by painting right over it, and 
here you can see I'm painting over the 
one in the middle (when I release the 
mouse button, a second later that one 
will be gone, too!). Note: The regular 
Healing Brush tool (the one where you 
have to choose the area to sample from 
by Option-clicking (PC: Alt-clicking) does 
not have the Content-Aware technology. 
Only the Spot Healing Brush tool and the 
Patch tool have it (but you have to turn it 
on for the Patch tool — it's on by default 
with the Spot Healing Brush). 



Step Eight: 

Let's use the Patch tool (press Shift-J 
until you have it), just so you can see 
how it works. You use it initially just like 
the Lasso tool: click-and-drag a loose 
selection around the object you want to 
remove (the large light pole, here), then 
click your cursor inside that selected area 
and drag it to a nearby clean area (you'll 
see a preview inside the selected area 
of what your patch will look like). Then, 
when you release the mouse button, 
it snaps back and the pole is removed. 
I use the Patch tool for removing larger 
objects like this. Also, if you want it to 
use the Content-Aware technology, in 
the Options Bar, choose Content-Aware 
from the Patch pop-up menu (as shown 
here). By the way, using this Content- 
Aware option won't always be better than 
the regular Patch tool healing — it just de- 
pends on the image. So, if you don't like 
the results of one, try the other. We're not 
done here yet, though. 

(Continued) 



Fixing Common Problems 



Chapter 8 



261 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Nine: 

Here's the result of dragging the selec- 
tion over to the right (look where my 
cursor is — over to the right of the original 
selection), and when it snapped back, it 
didn't look all that great (I could kind of 
see a little faint line where the pole had 
been. In cases like this, we just need to try 
another method, so press Command-Z 
(PC: Ctrl-Z) to Undo your patch, then 
Command-D (PC: Ctrl-D) to deselect, 
and let's go a different route. 



Step 10: 

Switch back to the Spot Healing Brush 
(press Shift-J until you have it), then just 
paint over the pole (as shown here), and 
let's see how that does. You can see it 
already did a great job removing the pole 
on the left and the power lines. 

TIP: Fixing Bad Repairs 

We were lucky in this photo that the 
things we wanted to repair were far 
away from our rider, but in a lot of cases 
where the objects are in closer proxim- 
ity, when you try to patch something, it 
doesn't patch your hole with background, 
it patches your hole with something in 
the foreground (imagine if, when we used 
Content-Aware, it filled the light pole with 
the motorbike? It happens more often 
than you'd think). To get around that, put 
a selection around what you want to tell 
Photoshop is "off limits" for using as a 
patch (in this case, you'd put a selection 
around the motorbike), then save that 
as a selection (under the Select menu, 
choose Save Selection, then click OK). 
Now, it will avoid that area when choos- 
ing areas to pull fill from. 





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= 




Step 11: 

You can see here, in this case, the Spot 
Healing Brush did a good job. I tried all 
our different techniques on that pole — 
everything from the Patch tool with and 
without Content-Aware, to the regular 
old Content-Aware Fill from the Fill dia- 
log — but for this particular image, the 
Spot Healing Brush just seemed to work 
the best. In fact, it worked so well that 
as soon as the pole was gone, I took it 
and painted right over those signs on the 
lower-left side of the image, and in two 
seconds they were gone — it filled in the 
dirt almost perfectly, as if they were 
never there. Before and After images 
are shown below. 




After 



Fixing Common Problems Chapter 8 263 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Moving Stuff Without 

Leaving a Hole by Using 

Content-Aware Move 



This is another one of those tools that makes you just scratch your head at 
the math that must be going on to perform the mini-miracle of letting you 
select something, then move it someplace else in your image, and Photoshop 
automatically repairs the area where it used to be. This doesn't work for every 
image, every time, and it's one of those tools you won't be reaching for every 
day, but when you need it, and it does its thing perfectly, your jaw hits the floor. 
It can be finicky sometimes, but I'll show you a few things to help it help you. 



Step One: 

Here's the image we're going to work 
on, and in this one, we want our sub- 
jects to be on the right side of the 
image, instead of being on the left. 



Step Two: 

From the Toolbox, grab a selection tool 
that you're comfortable with and draw a 
selection around the object(s) you want 
to move (in this case, the father and son). 
It doesn't have to be a perfect selection, 
but get fairly close. (Here, I selected the 
area between them and their shadow on 
the sand, as well.) Once your selection is 
in place, you can usually get better results 
from Content-Aware Move by expanding 
your selection outward by 4 or so pixels. 
So, go under the Select menu, under 
Modify, and choose Expand. When the 
Expand Selection dialog appears (shown 
here), enter 4 pixels, click OK, and your 
selection grows outward by that much. 

TIP: Draw Selection with 
Con tent- Aware Move 

You can use the Content-Aware Move 
tool to draw your selections, just like 
you would with the Lasso tool. 



Content Move.jpg @ 66.7% (RGB/ 8*) 




Content Move jpg. @ 66.7% (RGB/B*) 




Expand Selection 



Expand By: [4 pixels 



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nr>n 



Content Move.jpg @ 66.7% (RGB/ 8*) 





Step Three: 

Next, go to the Toolbox, and get the 
new Content-Aware Move tool (as shown 
here — it's nested in the same menu as 
the Healing Brush tool and Patch tool; or 
just press Shift-J until you have it). Now, 
click on your selected subjects and drag 
them over to the right side of the image 
(as shown here). The original of them 
will still be in the same position for a 
few seconds while Photoshop is freak- 
ing out (kidding. While Photoshop is 
doing its math). 



Step Four: 

When you release your mouse button, 
it's going to take a few moments for 
the magic to happen (depending on 
how large your file size is), but then 
you'll see that not only are your subjects 
moved, but the hole that would normally 
have been left behind is instead totally 
patched and filled (as shown here). How- 
ever, don't deselect quite yet. Leave your 
selection in place — especially if it didn't 
work well — because while it's still selected, 
you can change how Photoshop creates 
the background texture that blends with 
your move. You do this from the Adapta- 
tion pop-up menu up in the Options Bar. 
What's nice is, since your selection is still 
in place, you can choose a different op- 
tion from that menu and it will re-render 
your move. So, all you have to do is try 
each one and choose the one that looks 
the best (again, I do this only if there's a 
problem). Also, the stricter the method 
you choose, the more Photoshop uses 
of the actual real background. This looks 
more realistic in some cases, but it can 
make the move look weird in others, so 
it's best to try them all if it just doesn't 
look right. {Note: If needed, you can also 
switch to the Spot Healing Brush and 
clean up any stray areas it left behind.) 



Fixing Common Problems 



Chapter 8 



265 < 



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for Digital Photographers 



Photoshop Killer Tips 



How to Make Shadows/Highlights 
an Adjustment Layer 

Well, it won't technically be an adjust- 
ment layer, but it will act and perform ex- 
actly like one. Here's what you do: First, 
go under the Filter menu and choose Con- 
vert for Smart Filters (which converts the 
layer into a smart object). Then go under 
the Image menu, under Adjustments, and 
choose Shadows/Highlights. Now, choose 
any settings you like, then click OK. If you 
look in the Layers panel, you'll see that 
attached below your layer is a layer mask 
(just like an adjustment layer), and if you 




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double-click on the words "Shadows/ 
Highlights" below the mask, it brings 
up the dialog again, with the last settings 
you applied (just like an adjustment layer). 



Also, just like an adjustment layer: if you 
double-click on the little adjustment slid- 
ers icon to the right of the name, it brings 
up a dialog where you can change the 
blend mode and opacity; you can click the 
Eye icon to turn the adjustment on/off; and 
finally, you can delete it anytime during 
your project. 

Changing the Position 
of Your Lens Flare 

When you use the Lens Flare filter (found 
under the Filter menu, under Render) it 
puts the flare in the center of your image, 




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but you can actually choose the posi- 
tion for your flare center (which changes 
the look of your flare quite a bit) by just 
clicking-and-dragging the flare center 
within the filter's Preview window. By the 
way, a great way to apply this filter is to 
add a new layer, fill it with black, then run 
the filter, change its layer blend mode 
to Screen, and it will blend in with your 
image, so you can drag it wherever you'd 
like (if an edge shows, add a layer mask 
and paint over the edges in black with a 
huge, soft-edged brush). 



Not Sure Which Blend Mode Is 
the Right One? 




Then just press Shift-+ to toggle through 
all the layer blend modes one-by-one, so 
you can quickly find out which one looks 
best to you. 

How to Change the Order of 
the Brushes in the Brush Picker 

Go under the Edit menu, under Presets, 

and choose Preset Manager. When the 

dialog opens, by default it's set to display 

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all your brushes, so now all you have to do 
is click-and-drag them into the order you 
want them. When you've got everything in 
the order you want, click the Done button. 

Changing the Color of Your Guides 

Want to change the color of those guides 
you drag out from the rulers? Just pull out 
a guide, then double-click directly on it, 
and it brings up the Preferences dialog 



► 266 



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The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



Photoshop Killer Tips 



General 

File Handling 
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for Guides, Grid & Slices, where you can 
choose any color you'd like. You can also 
press Command-K (PC: Ctrl-K) and click 
on Guides, Grid & Slices on the left. 

What That Fill Field Does 

In the Layers panel, right below the 
Opacity field is a Fill field, which has 
had Photoshop users scratching their 
heads since it debuted several versions 
ago. It only kicks in when you have a 



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layer style applied to a layer, like a drop 
shadow or bevel. If you have something 
on a layer and you apply a drop shadow 
to it, then lower the Opacity amount, the 
object and its shadow both fade away, 
right? But if you lower the Fill amount 
only, the object starts to fade away, but 
the drop shadow stays at 100% opacity. 



The Hidden Shortcut for Flattening 
Your Layers 

There technically isn't a keyboard shortcut 
for the Flatten command, but I use a stan- 
dard shortcut for flattening my image all 
the time. It's Command-Shift-E (PC: Ctrl- 
Shift-E). That's actually the shortcut for 
Merge Visible, so it only works if you don't 
have any hidden layers, but I usually don't, 
so it usually works. 



Customizing the HUD 
Pop-Up Color Picker 



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You can have a heads-up display color 
picker appear onscreen when you're using 
the Brush tool by pressing Command- 
Option-Ctrl (PC: Alt-Shift) and clicking 
(PC: Right-clicking). And, did you know 
you also get to choose which type and 
size of HUD you want? Press Command-K 
(PC: Ctrl-K) to bring up Photoshop's pref- 
erences, click on General on the left, then 
up near the top of the General preferences 
is a HUD Color Picker pop-up menu for 
choosing your style and size. 

Changing Brush Blend Modes 
on the Fly 

If you want to change the blend mode 
for your current brush without traveling 
up to the Options Bar, just press Shift-Ctrl 
(PC: Shift) and click (PC: Right-click) 

anywhere in your image, and a pop-up 
menu of Brush tool blend modes appears. 



Creating Cast Shadows 

To create a cast shadow (rather than a 
drop shadow), first apply a Drop Shadow 
layer style to your object (choose Drop 
Shadow from the Add a Layer Style icon's 
pop-up menu at the bottom of the Layers 
panel, change your settings, and click OK), 
then go under the Layer menu, under 
Layer Style, and choose Create Layer. This 
puts the drop shadow on its own separate 
layer. Click on that new drop shadow layer, 
then press Command-T (PC: Ctrl-T) to 
bring up Free Transform. Now, press-and- 
hold the Command (PC: Ctrl) key, grab the 
top center point, and drag down at a 45° 
angle to create a cast shadow (like your 
shadow is casting onto the floor). 




Copying Layer Masks 
from One Layer to Another 

If you've created a layer mask, and you 
want that same mask to appear on a differ- 
ent layer, press-and-hold the Option (PC: 
Alt) key and just drag-and-drop that mask 
onto the layer where you want it. It makes 
a copy, leaving the original intact. If you 
want to remove the mask from one layer 
and apply it to another, then don't hold the 
Option key and, instead, just click-and-drag 
the mask to the layer where you want it. 



Fixing Common Problems 



Chapter 8 



267 < 




Photo by Scott Kelby Exposure: 1/125 sec | Focal Length: 70mm | Aperture Value: f/2.8 



Chapter 9 Special Effects for Photographers 




Side Effects 

special effects for photographers 



The name of this chapter comes from the 2009 movie short 
Side Effects (it's less than 20 minutes long, which is probably 
why you can buy it for only $1.99 in the iTunes Store. It's 
either that, or it's so cheap because of its lack of zombies). 
Anyway, here's how they describe Side Effects (say this in 
your best movie voice-over guy voice): "An ordinary guy 
becomes a human guinea pig in an experimental drug test 
and meets the girl of his dreams..." Sounds like a pretty 
typical everyday story. At least the human guinea pig in 
an experimental drug test part. Anyway, I looked at the 
movie poster, and the guys in the poster all have this creepy- 
looking bluish/green color cast that makes them look kind 
of sickly, but then the female lead's photo looks fine, with 
regular-looking flesh tones, and that's when I realized why 
this guy thinks he's found the woman of his dreams. She 
doesn't have a creepy bluish/green color cast. I mean, think 



about it. If all the girls around you had a serious white 
balance problem, and then all of sudden you meet a girl 
carrying around her own 18% gray card, and so she looks 
correctly color balanced in any lighting situation, wouldn't 
you fall in love with her, too? Exactly. I'll bet in the last 
10 minutes of the movie, you find out that this guy actually 
starts an online business for people using dating sites like 
eHarmony, or Match.com, or HandsomeStalker.com, where 
he offers to remove bluish/green color casts from your 
profile photo for a price. Things are going pretty well for 
him for a while, but then in about the eighteenth minute, 
the experimental drug wears off, and he finds himself 
trapped in a dank, dimly-lit room, forced to write non- 
sensical chapter intros late into the night, until his wife 
comes in and says "Honey, come to bed," but right then, 
he notices she has a bluish/green color cast, and.... 



269 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Trendy 

Desatu rated 

Skin Look 



This is just about the hottest Photoshop portrait technique out there right now, 
and you see it popping up everywhere, from covers of magazines to CD covers, 
from print ads to Hollywood movie posters, and from editorial images to billboards. 
It seems right now everybody wants this effect (and you're about to be able to de- 
liver it in roughly 60 seconds flat using the simplified method shown here!). 



Step One: 

Open the photo you want to apply 
this trendy desaturated portrait effect 
to. Duplicate the Background layer by 
pressing Command-J (PC: Ctrl-J). 

Then duplicate this layer using the same 
shortcut (so you have three layers in all, 
which all look the same, as shown here). 



Step Two: 

In the Layers panel, click on the middle 
layer (Layer 1) to make it the active layer, 
then press Command-Shift-U (PC: Ctrl- 

Shift-U) to Desaturate and remove all 
the color from that layer. Now, lower the 
Opacity of this layer to 80%, so just a little 
color shows through. Of course, there's 
still a color photo on the top of the layer 
stack, so you won't see anything change 
onscreen (you'll still see your color photo), 
but if you look in the Layers panel, you'll 
see the thumbnail for the center layer is 
in black and white (as seen here). 




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Step Three: 

In the Layers panel, click on the top layer 
in the stack (Layer 1 copy), then switch its 
layer blend mode from Normal to Soft 
Light (as shown here), which brings the 
effect into play. Now, Soft Light brings a 
very nice, subtle version of the effect, but 
if you want something a bit edgier with 
even more contrast, try using Overlay 
mode instead. If the Overlay version is a 
bit too intense, try lowering the Opacity 
of the layer a bit until it looks good to 
you, but honestly, I usually just go with 
Soft Light myself. 



Step Four: 

Our last step is to limit the effect to 
just our subject's skin (of course, you 
can leave it over the entire image if it 
looks good, but normally I just use this 
as a skin effect. So, if it looks good to you 
as-is, you can skip this step). To limit it to 
just the skin, press Command-Option- 
Shift-E (PC: Ctrl-Alt-Shift-E) to create 
a merged layer on top of the layer stack 
(a merged layer is a new layer that looks 
like you flattened the image). You don't 
need the two layers below it any longer, 
so you can hide them from view by click- 
ing on the Eye icon to the left of each 
layer's thumbnail (like I did here), or you 
can just delete them altogether. Now, 
press-and-hold the Option (PC: Alt) key 
and click on the Add Layer Mask icon at 
the bottom of the Layers panel to hide our 
desaturated layer behind a black mask. 
Press D to set your Foreground color to 
white, get the Brush tool (B), choose a 
medium-sized, soft-edged brush from 
the Brush Picker in the Options Bar, and 
just paint over his face and hands (or any 
visible skin) to complete the effect. If you 
think the effect is too intense, just lower 
the Opacity of this layer until it looks right 
to you. That's it! 



Special Effects for Photographers 



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for Digital Photographers 



High-Contrast 
Portrait Look 



The super-high-contrast, desaturated look is incredibly popular right now, and while 
there are a number of plug-ins that can give you this look, along with a Camera Raw 
technique I'll show you next, I also wanted to include this version, which I learned 
from German retoucher Calvin Hollywood, who shared this technique during a stint 
as my special guest blogger at my daily blog (www.scottkelby.com). The great thing 
about his version is: (1) you can write an action for it and apply it with one click, 
and (2) you don't need to buy a third-party plug-in to get this look. My thanks to 
Calvin for sharing this technique with me, and now you. 



Step One: 

Open the image you want to apply a 
high-contrast look to. Let's start, right 
off the bat, by creating an action to 
record our steps, so when you're done, 
you can reapply this same look to other 
photos with just one click. Go to the 
Actions panel, and click on the Create 
New Action icon at the bottom of the 
panel. When the New Action dialog ap- 
pears, name this "High-Contrast Look" 
and click the Record button. Now it's 
recording every move you make... 
every step you take, it'll be watching 
you (sorry, I just couldn't resist). 



Step Two: 

Make a copy of your Background layer 
by pressing Command-J (PC: Ctrl-J). 

Now, change the blend mode of this 
duplicate layer to Vivid Light (I know it 
doesn't look pretty now, but it'll get 
better in a few more moves). 




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Step Three: 

Now press Command-I (PC: Ctrl-I) to 

Invert the layer (it should look pretty 
gray at this point). Next, go under the 
Filter menu, under Blur, and choose 
Surface Blur. When the dialog appears, 
enter 40 for the Radius and 40 for the 
Threshold, and click OK (it takes a while 
for this particular filter to do its thing, 
so be patient. If you're running this on 
a 16-bit version of your photo, this 
wouldn't be a bad time to grab a cup 
of coffee. Maybe a sandwich, too). 



Step Four: 

We need to change the layer's blend 
mode again, but we can't change this 
one from Vivid Light or it will mess up the 
effect, so instead we're going to create a 
new layer, on top of the stack, that looks 
like a flattened version of the image. That 
way, we can change its blend mode to 
get a different look. This is called "creat- 
ing a merged layer," and you get this layer 
by pressing Command-Option-Shift-E 
(PC: Ctrl-Alt-Shift-E). 



(Continued) 



Special Effects for Photographers Chapter 9 273 i 



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for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

Now that you have this new merged layer, 
you need to delete the middle layer (the 
one you ran the Surface Blur upon), so 
drag it onto the Trash icon at the bottom 
of the Layers panel. Next, we have to deal 
with all the funky neon colors on this layer, 
and we do that by simply removing all the 
color. Go under the Image menu, under 
Adjustments, and choose Desaturate, so 
the layer only looks gray. Then, change 
the blend mode of your merged layer 
(Layer 2) to Overlay, and now you can 
start to see the effect taking shape. You 
can stop right there (I usually do), but 
if you think you need an even stronger 
high-contrast effect (hey, it's possible. 
It just depends on the image, and how 
much texture and contrast you want it 
to have), you can continue on and crank 
your amp up to 11 (sorry for the lame 
This Is Spinal Tap movie reference). 



Step Six: 

Go under the Image menu, under Adjust- 
ments, and choose Shadows/Highlights. 

In the dialog, drag the Shadows Amount 
down to 0. Turn on the Show More Op- 
tions checkbox to reveal more editing 
options. Then, you're going to add what 
amounts to Camera Raw's Clarity by in- 
creasing the amount of Midtone Contrast 
on this Overlay layer. Go down near the 
bottom of the dialog and drag the Mid- 
tone Contrast slider to the right, and 
watch how your image starts to get that 
crispy look (crispy, in a good way). Of 
course, the farther to the right you drag, 
the crispier it gets, so don't go too far, 
because you're still going to sharpen 
this image. Click OK. The next step 
is optional, so if you don't need it, go 
to the Layers panel's flyout menu and 
choose Flatten Image. Don't forget to 
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Step Seven: 

Okay, this high-contrast look looks great 
on a lot of stuff, but one area where it 
doesn't look that good (and makes your 
image look obviously post-processed) is 
when you apply this to blurry, out-of-focus 
backgrounds, like the one you see here. 
So, I would only apply it to our subject and 
not the background. Here's how: Option- 
click (PC: Alt-click) on the Add Layer Mask 
icon at the bottom of the Layers panel 
to hide the contrast layer behind a black 
mask (so the effect is hidden from view). 
With your Foreground color set to white, 
get the Brush tool (B), choose a medium- 
sized, soft-edged brush, and paint over 
his face to add the high-contract effect 
there. Now, in the Options Bar, lower the 
brush's Opacity to 70% (so the effect isn't 
as intense), then paint over his turban and 
clothes. This way, you avoid adding the 
contrast to the blurry background alto- 
gether. Lastly, go to the Layers panel and 
lower the Opacity of this layer until it looks 
more natural, as shown here at 67%. Now, 
you can flatten the layers and sharpen 
it using Unsharp Mask (see Chapter 10. 
Here, I used Amount: 120, Radius: 1, 
Threshold: 3) to finish off the effect. 




Before 



After 



Special Effects for Photographers Chapter 9 275 i 



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for Digital Photographers 



Getting the Grungy, 
High-Contrast Look 
Within Camera Raw 



If you want that extreme-contrast, grungy look, you can create it right within 
Camera Raw itself by just dragging a few sliders in the Basic panel. If you're going 
to leave Camera Raw and go to Photoshop at some point anyway, you should try 
poppin' some High Pass sharpening on this puppy, too. Shots with lots of texture and 
metal just love a little High Pass tossed on them, too, so give it a try. But let's not 
get ahead of ourselves — here's the grungy look made easy: 



Step One: 

Open a photo in Camera Raw. This is 
one of those effects that needs the right 
kind of image for it to look right. Photos 
with lots of detail, texture, along with 
anything metallic, and lots of contrast 
seem to work best (it also works great for 
sports portraits like this one, cars, and 
even some landscapes. In other words: 
I wouldn't apply this effect to a shot of a 
cute little fuzzy bunny). Here's the original 
RAW image open in Camera Raw. {Note: 
This effect actually seems to come out 
better when you run it on RAW images, 
rather than JPEG or TIFF, but it does 
work on all three.) 



Step Two: 

Set these three sliders all at 100: Con- 
trast, Shadows, and Clarity (as shown 
here). Depending on the photo, this 
can make it look a little too bright or a 
little too washed out (his face looks a 
lot brighter and a bit washed out). So, 
you might have to tweak the Exposure 
slider a bit (most likely dragging it to 
the left to make the overall photo a 
little darker). I didn't do that here, but 
I wanted you to be aware just in case 
it happens to you. 





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Step Three: 

To keep the photo from looking too 
washed out in the deepest shadow areas, 
drag the Blacks slider to the left until the 
photo looks more balanced (like it does 
here, where I dragged it over to -54). Also, 
to "crush" back the highlights (it's part 
of the look of this high-contrast effect), 
you're going to drag the Highlights slider 
all the way to the left to -100. Okay, we're 
getting close. 

Step Four: 

Dragging that Blacks slider over like you 
did in the previous step generally makes 
your colors really vivid and saturated, 
but part of this effect is to intentionally 
desaturate the image. So, lower the 
Vibrance amount until it looks desatu- 
rated quite a bit (remember, that's part 
of the look). Here, I lowered it to -64. 
Lastly, if the image looks a little too dark, 
you can bring out the brightest highlights 
by dragging the Whites slider over to the 
right (as I did here — just a bit — over to 
+25). You won't do this to every image, 
but when it needs that little kicker in 
the highlights, dragging the Whites slider 
to the right a bit will often do the trick. 
A before/after is shown below. One more 
thing: is this image just screamin' for some 
High Pass sharpening, or what? (See page 
347 for how to add it.) 





Before 



After 



Special Effects for Photographers 



Chapter 9 



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for Digital Photographers 



Dreamy Focus 

Effect for People 

and Landscapes 



This is an effect I get asked about a lot, because I use it a lot. The particular thing 
I get asked is, "How do you get that look where your image looks sharp, but soft 
at the same time?" Well, it's actually really simple, but don't tell anybody it's this 
simple, because I'd prefer that people thought I had to pull off some serious 
Photoshop magic to make this happen. LOL! 



Step One: 

The sharpness of this effect comes 
from sharpening the image right up front, 
so I usually save this effect for when I'm 
about to save the file (in other words, I 
usually save the sharpening for the end, 
but in this case, there's another move 
that happens after the sharpening, so 
let's start with the sharpening first). Go 
under the Filter menu, under Sharpen, 
and choose Unsharp Mask. When the 
dialog appears, enter 120% for the 
Amount, set the Radius to 1.0, and 
set the Threshold to 3 for some nice 
punchy sharpening. Click OK. 



Step Two: 

Duplicate this sharpened layer by press- 
ing Command-J (PC: Ctrl-J). 




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Step Three: 

Now, go to the Filter menu, under Blur, 
and choose Gaussian Blur. When the 
filter dialog appears, enter 25 pixels for 
the Radius (you may have to go to 35 
pixels or higher if you have a 24-mega- 
pixel, or higher, camera. Don't worry so 
much about the number, just make sure 
your image looks at least as blurry as 
this one does), and click OK. 



Step Four: 

Finally, go to the Layers panel and change 
the Opacity amount of this blurred layer 
to 30% (as shown here), and that com- 
pletes the effect. Now, I know what you're 
thinking, "Scott. Seriously. Is that all there 
is to it?" Yes, and that's why it's best we 
keep this just between us. ;-) 



Special Effects for Photographers 



Chapter 9 



279 < 



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for Digital Photographers 



Getting the 
Instagram Look 



Here's a quick and easy, all-in-Camera-Raw way to get the wildly popular 
Instagram app look. Of course, there isn't just one "look," because Instagram 
has like 15 different ones, but this will at least take you in the right direction. 
One more thing: I know you're thinking, "Do people really want to learn how to 
do phone app looks in Photoshop?" Yup. It's one of the most-requested effects 
people ask to learn (don't get me started). Luckily, it's easy, and the looks are 
actually based on classic darkroom effects, so that can't be a bad thing. 



Step One: 

Start by opening your image in Camera 
Raw. One of the trademark looks of the 
Instagram app is its square cropping 
ratio, so let's start there. Click-and-hold 
on the Crop tool in the toolbar at the 
top, and a list of cropping ratios appears 
(seen here). Choose the 1 to 1 ratio (as 
shown), which gives you a square crop. 



Step Two: 

Drag your cropping border out over 
the part of the image you want to have 
your effect (in this case, it's pretty obvi- 
ous which part of the image we should 
keep). Once the crop is where you want 
it, just press the Return (PC: Enter) key 
to lock in your square crop. From here 
on out, it's pretty darn easy — I'll give you 
some sliders to set, and a couple of minor 
little moves, and you're there. Let's do it. 



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Step Three: 

Another trademark part of the Instagram 
look is that the images have very flat con- 
trast (after all, these are imitating some 
vintage camera looks), so start by drag- 
ging your Contrast slider all the way to 
the left to -100. Then, go ahead and 
crank up the Vibrance a bunch to +100. 
Now, we'll add a little contrast back in 
by dragging the Whites to the right to 
increase the very brightest highlights 
(here, I dragged over to +55), and bring 
some color back to the darkest shadow 
areas by dragging the Blacks slider to 
the left (here, I dragged it over to -70). 
At this point, the photo looks kind of 
yellowish. Not for long, though. 



Step Four: 

Click on the Tone Curve icon (the sec- 
ond icon from the left) at the top of the 
Panel area, and when that panel appears, 
click on the Point tab. Then, from the 
Channel pop-up menu, choose Green. 
Don't worry — even if you've never used 
the Tone Curve before, you'll absolutely 
be able to do this. You see that diago- 
nal line running from the bottom-left cor- 
ner up to the top-right corner? Well, grab 
the point at the bottom of the line and 
drag it up a bit (as shown here) to bump 
up the greens. See, that was easy, eh? 



(Continued) 



Special Effects for Photographers Chapter 9 281 < 



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for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

Now that you've got the hang of adjust- 
ing the curve, choose Blue from the 
Channel pop-up menu. Grab the same 
point (the bottom-left corner point) and 
drag upward, but this time you're going 
to keep dragging until you pass the center 
line and stop about halfway up the next 
grid square (as seen here). Next, grab 
the top-right corner point and drag 
downward to just a hair or two past 
the center of the first grid square (as 
seen here). This gives the image more 
of a teal-and-yellowish feel. 

TIP: Add Grain for a Film-Like Look 

If you want more of a film look, click 
on the Effects icon in Camera Raw (the 
fourth from the right), and at the top is 
a Grain Amount slider (designed to 
emulate film grain). Drag it to the right 
to add more of a grainy look to your 
In stag ram -effect images. 



Step Six: 

Next, click on the fifth icon from the left, 
at the top of the Panel area, to bring up 
the Split Toning panel. Here, you can add 
one color tint to the highlights in your 
photo, and a different one to the shadow 
areas, and then you can control the bal- 
ance between the two. We'll start with 
the highlights, so drag the Highlights 
Saturation slider to 37 (we drag the Sat- 
uration slider first, so we can actually see 
the hue. At its default, you can drag that 
Hue slider all day and never see any dif- 
ference). Then, drag the Hue slider to 47, 
which gives you a yellow tint in the high- 
lights. Jump down to the Shadows and 
increase the Saturation to 100 and set the 
Hue at 273 for a blue tint in the shadows. 
Lastly, we're going to drag the Balance 
slider to the right — over to +65 — so there 
are more blue shadows than yellow high- 
lights in our split tone (as seen here). 





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Step Seven: 

Now, we're going to add a fake border 
right in Camera Raw. This is kinda similar 
to one of the built-in Instagram borders. 
Click on the Effects icon (the fourth from 
the right), and then go down to the Post 
Crop Vignetting section and drag the 
Amount slider all the way to the left, to 
-100 (as shown here), to make your border 
solid black. Then, drag the other three 
sliders all the way to the left, as well, and 
that gives you the hard-edged, rounded- 
corner border you see here. 



Step Eight: 

Instagram also gives you the option of 
a white border, and you can do that in 
Camera Raw, too: just change the Style of 
your Post Crop Vignette to Paint Overlay, 
then drag your Amount slider all the way 
to the far right (to +100) to get a solid 
white border like the one you see here. 
By the way, for a quick color variation of 
the image, go back to the Tone Curve 
panel, to the Blue channel, and drag the 
point on the left side back down to the 
left corner (as shown below center). Do 
the same in the Green channel, then take 
away some of the contrast by lowering 
the Whites to -100, and lastly bump up 
the Exposure a little to give you the al- 
ternate reddish look you see here, below 
left. Lastly, once you've adjusted all these 
sliders, it would be the perfect time to 
save these settings as a one-click preset 
(so, next time, this entire look is just one 
click away). Click on the Presets icon (the 
second from the right), then click on the 
Create New Preset icon at the bottom- 
right of the panel (it looks like the Create 
a New Layer icon) and save your settings. 
For more on saving presets, see page 
167. Okay, there ya go bunky. 



Special Effects for Photographers 



Chapter 9 



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Panoramas 
Made Crazy Easy 



I used to have an entire segment in my live Photoshop seminars where I'd show you 
the seven things you needed to do with your camera to shoot a pano that Photoshop 
would merge seamlessly together. Then, Adobe improved the Photomerge feature 
so vastly that you now only need to do one simple thing: as you shoot, overlap each 
frame by around 20% (so if you're shooting in the desert, from left to right, the same 
rock would appear on the right edge of the first shot and the left edge of the next 
frame). That way, Photoshop sees how they get stitched together. Outside of that, 
you can now even hand-hold your shots and it will perfectly align your frames, too. 



Step One: 

This first thing isn't technically a Photo- 
shop thing, but if you do it, it sure will 
make working with panos easier. When 
you're out shooting, and you're about to 
shoot a pano, before you shoot your first 
pano frame, hold your index finger up in 
front of your lens and take a photo. Then 
go ahead and take your pano, and right 
after you shoot your last frame, hold up 
two fingers in front of your lens and take 
another photo. Here's where this pays off: 
When you open all your photos from that 
day's shoot in Mini Bridge, you could eas- 
ily have hundreds of photos (especially if 
these are vacation photos). As you scroll 
through, as soon as you see an index 
finger, you know these are your pano 
photos (by the way, if you have that whole 
self-loathing thing going on, or if you're 
a teen, you don't have to use your index 
finger). Plus, it not only tells you that you 
shot a pano, it tells you exactly where it 
starts and where it ends (as seen here). 
It sounds silly, but if you don't do this, 
you'll actually miss panos you took, and 
you'll just kind of wonder, "What was 
I thinking when I took those?" and you'll 
scroll right by them. It's happened to me, 
and so many of my friends, that we now 
all use this technique, and we never miss 
a pano. Okay, now press-and-hold the 
Command (PC: Ctrl) key and click on each 
photo thumbnail between your two finger 
shots (as shown here). 









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► 284 



Chapter 9 



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for Digital Photographers 



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Step Two: 

Before you create your pano, here's 
something to consider: if you just jump 
over to Photoshop and create your pano, 
when you see it next, it will be a regular 
8-bit Photoshop image (in other words, 
it won't be a RAW image any longer). 
That's why I like to do some up-front 
image tweaking, while those images are 
still in RAW format, before we "bake it" 
and turn it into a regular Photoshop file. 
So, since those pano images are already 
selected, just double-click on any one of 
them to open them all in Camera Raw 
(as shown here). Press Command-A (PC: 
Ctrl-A) to select all the images you just 
opened (that way, any changes you make 
to one image are automatically applied 
to the rest of the pano frames). Now, let's 
increase the Exposure (here, I went to 
+0.10) and Contrast (to +39), pull back 
the Highlights to -66 to bring back some 
detail and dimension in the sky, bump the 
Shadows up to +78, so we can see more 
detail in the shadow areas, and lastly, 
let's crank the Clarity to +81 and the 
Vibrance to +24. Now, don't click Open 
Images, just click Done. 



Step Three: 

Back in Mini Bridge, the thumbnails of 
those images will now have a little circu- 
lar adjustment badge icon, letting you 
know they've been adjusted in Camera 
Raw. Make sure those images are still 
selected (everything between the two 
finger shots), then Right-click on any 
one of those thumbnails and from the 
pop-up menu that appears, under Photo- 
shop, choose Photomerge (as shown 
here). Note: If you opened your photos 
in Photoshop, then you can go under the 
File menu, under Automate, and choose 
Photomerge. Either way, they both will 
get you to the same place, but I prefer 
going directly from the RAW images, 
if possible. 

(Continued) 



Special Effects for Photographers 



Chapter 9 



285 < 



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Step Four: 

When you choose Photomerge, it 
brings up the dialog you see here, with 
the images you selected listed in the 
center column. {Note: /f you opened 
your pano photos from within Photo- 
shop, the center column will be empty, 
so you'll click the Add Open Files but- 
ton.) We'll look at the Layout part in the 
next step, and jump down below that 
center column. Leave the Blend Images 
Together checkbox turned on. Now, there 
are two other options you may need, de- 
pending on how you shot your pano: 
(1) If you have lens vignetting (the edges 
of your images appear darkened), then 
turn on Vignette Removal (as I did here), 
and although it will take a little longer 
to render your pano, it will try to remove 
the vignetting during the process (it 
does a pretty decent job). If you're 
using a Nikon, Sigma, or Canon fisheye 
lens to shoot your panos, then turn on 
the Geometric Distortion Correction 
checkbox at the bottom to correct 
the fisheye distortion. 



Step Five: 

In the Layout section on the left, the 
default setting is Auto (as seen in Step 
Four), and I recommend leaving that set 
to Auto to get the standard wide pano 
we're looking for. The five Layout choices 
below Auto (Perspective, Cylindrical, 
Spherical, Collage, and Reposition) all 
give you. ..well. ..funky looking panos 
(that's the best description I can give 
you), but suffice it to say — they don't 
give you that nice wide pano most of 
us are looking for. So, let's just stick with 
Auto. Click OK, and within a few min- 
utes (depending on how many photos 
you shot for it), your pano is seamlessly 
stitched together (as seen here). In the 
Layers panel, you can see all the masks it 
created to do its thing. 



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Step Six: 

To make your pano fit perfectly together, 
Photomerge has to move and rearrange 
things in a way that will cause you to 
have to crop the photo down to get the 
final result you want (we get the easy job — 
cropping only takes about 10 seconds). 
So, get the Crop tool (C), which brings 
up a cropping border around your image 
(like you see here). Don't worry if there are 
a few gaps along the edges, because we'll 
fix that in a moment. 



Step Seven: 

Press Return (PC: Enter), and your pano 
is cropped down to size (as seen here), 
but you can see that we have gaps in all 
four corners (and a couple of tiny white 
gaps on the top-right side, which we can 
fix later with the Clone Stamp tool — that's 
easy — but we need to deal with these 
corner problems now). First, from the 
Layers panel's flyout menu, choose Merge 
Visible to merge all your layers and leave 
the background transparent. Next, get 
the Magic Wand tool (press Shift-W until 
you have it), click in the top-left gap once, 
then press-and-hold the Shift key and 
click in the other corners (holding the 
Shift key lets you add the other areas to 
your current left-corner selection). We're 
going to use Content-Aware Fill to fill in 
those gaps, but it works best if you give it 
some breathing room by expanding your 
selected areas by 4 pixels. To do that, go 
under the Select menu, under Modify, 
and choose Expand. Enter 4 pixels (as 
shown here) to grow your selection out- 
ward a bit, and click OK. Now our file is 
ready to let Content-Aware work its magic. 

(Continued) 



Special Effects for Photographers 



Chapter 9 



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for Digital Photographers 



Step Eight: 

Go under the Edit menu and choose Fill. 
When the dialog appears (shown here), 
from the Use pop-up menu at the top, 
choose Content-Aware, then click OK, 
sit back, and prepare to be amazed. Well, 
most of the time it's pretty darn amazing. 
Every once in a while, it's just way, way off 
and you have to undo it and go a different 
route. But, when it's fixing things like gaps 
in the sky, or in a desert floor, or anything 
that's kind of random by nature, it works 
wonders, and in an image like this, it does 
a really great job (as shown here). Press 
Command-D (PC: Ctrl-D) to deselect. 



Step Nine: 

Now for some finishing moves. I would 
generally create a neutral density gradi- 
ent filter effect here to darken the sky 
(like we did in Camera Raw in Chapter 4), 
which is simple to do in Photoshop. Click 
on the Create New Adjustment Layer icon 
at the bottom of the Layers panel and 
choose Gradient from the pop-up menu. 
When the dialog appears, turn on the 
Reverse checkbox (otherwise, it does the 
opposite of what you want — it darkens 
the foreground instead of the sky). Now, 
click on the Gradient itself to bring up 
the Gradient Editor. Click on the last gra- 
dient in the default Presets list — that's the 
Neutral Density gradient. To control how 
far down this gradient extends into your 
image, click-and-drag the white Opacity 
stop (shown circled here in the red) to the 
left. The farther you drag, the shorter the 
gradient extends down into your image. 
I usually like it in the top Va to Vz of the sky. 
When you're done, click OK twice, then, 
in the Layers panel, change the blend 
mode of this layer to Overlay. 



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Target: Untitled_Panoramal (_D.„., Lab) 



- Blending: { Soft Light 



Opacity: [iPQ | % 

Q Preserve Transparency 

□ Mask... 




B 


1DOK 


Amount: 


120 


* 














Radius: 


1.2 


| Pixels 


U 






Threshold: 


? 


| levels 







Step 10: 

At this point, to make the color more vi- 
brant, you could save the file as a JPEG, 
TIFF, or PSD, then reopen the image in 
Camera Raw and increase the Vibrance 
amount. If that sounds like a lot of work, 
try this instead: Press Command-E (PC: 
Ctrl-E) to merge your two layers, then 
go under the Image menu, under Mode, 
and choose Lab Color (don't worry, this 
is a non-destructive move). Go under the 
Image menu, again, and choose Apply 
Image. In the dialog (shown here), first 
change the Blending mode to Soft Light, 
which builds up the contrast. Then, from 
the Channel pop-up menu, try all three 
channels, Lab, "a," and "b" (ignore the 
Lightness channel — you'll never use it), 
and see which one looks best to you. In 
this case, I chose "a," which added a lot 
of warmth to the foreground and rock for- 
mations in back. When it looks good to you, 
click OK, then go back under the Image 
menu, under Mode, and choose RGB 
Color. Now you can sharpen it by going 
under the Filter menu, under Sharpen, and 
choosing Unsharp Mask. Pick some nice 
strong settings (here, I chose Amount: 120, 
Radius: 1.2, Threshold: 3), and click OK to 
finish the image (seen below). 




Special Effects for Photographers 



Chapter 9 



289 < 



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for Digital Photographers 



Turning a Photo 

into an Oil Painting 

in One Click 



Being able to easily turn a photo into a realistic-looking painting has been on 
the photographer's wish list for quite some time (this look is very popular with 
wedding and portrait photographers), and after years of being a painstakingly 
tedious and complex technique to get even close, now in Photoshop CS6, it literally 
is a one-click process (because as soon as you open the Oil Paint filter — boom — 
it's an oil painting before you even touch a single slider). Now, of course, there 
are sliders, and that's why this isn't just a one-page project, but you are going 
to love how simple this really is. 



Step One: 

Open an image you want to turn into 
an oil painting. Here's a shot of Byron 
Hamburgers in London (mmmmm... 
burger) taken on vacation late at night 
(think "midnight burger run"). I did a little 
HDR on this image (as if there was such a 
thing as "a little" HDR), but we're going 
to turn it into an oil painting in one click. 
For reasons I can't even begin to under- 
stand, there is no Preview checkbox in the 
Oil Paint filter, so I usually start by press- 
ing Command-J (PC: Ctrl-J) to duplicate 
the Background layer (as shown here), so 
at least that way you can easily see a 
before/after. 



Step Two: 

Now, go under the Filter menu, choose 
Oil Paint (it's near the top of the menu), 
and that's it — you've got an oil painting. 
But to really see the effect, zoom in to 
100% (like you see here), and you can see 
it does a pretty amazing job of keeping 
detail, while looking very painterly at the 
same time. Of course, you can just click 
OK and be done with it, but you actually 
have quite a bit of control over how your 
oil painting looks (and messing around 
with the sliders in this filter is actually fun, 
so it's worth giving it a go). 



tJyiQfi Ham-burg** & liandon.jpg - i^% lUyti , 





► 290 



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for Digital Photographers 



: 




I J* m \ i 

Brush Stylization set to 0.1 




Brush Stylization set to 10 




Brush Cleanliness set to 10 



— Brush 

Stylization 
At. 




fan 


Cleanliness 






3.25 | 


Scale 






| 5.1 


Bristle Detail 






1 0.55 | 





— Brush 

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Cleanliness 




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— Brush 

5tylization 






fs 


Cleanliness 




F~l 






""% 


5cale 


|s.i 


Bristle Detail 






1 0.55 | 





Step Three: 

I'll take you through the sliders here, so 
you can see how each one affects part 
of the image, and I'll show before/after 
images, as well, so it makes more sense. 
At the top, you've got the Brush controls, 
and the first is the Stylization slider. This 
lets you choose the style of the brush 
that paints the image. Set to 0.1 (all the 
way to the left), it paints with small, hard 
brush strokes, which gives you the look 
you see here at the top (it almost looks 
like stucco on the walls, right?). If you drag 
that slider over all the way to the right, the 
strokes get longer, and the effect looks 
more smooth and graceful (if not a little 
Van Gogh-esque). I usually prefer some- 
thing more toward the middle or higher 
numbers, and of course it always depends 
on the image you're working on, but I've 
yet to find one where I want to leave it 
set at 0.1. 



Step Four: 

A good name for the second Brush 
slider would have been Detail, but then 
we would have known exactly what it 
does, so instead, it's named Cleanliness. 
If you want the brush to paint your image 
with a cleaner, more detailed look (more 
realistic), drag the slider to the left, and 
for more of a softer, more painterly look 
(at bottom), drag the slider to the right. 
Also note that I've set the Stylization 
slider to 5 (the midway point). I'll do that 
for each previous slider as we move on 
through the rest of the sliders. 



(Continued) 



Special Effects for Photographers Chapter 9 291 < 



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for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

The Scale slider controls the size of your 
brush, so dragging it way over to the left 
would paint your image with a very thin 
brush, and dragging it all the way over to 
the right would paint it with a very thick 
strokes. Take at look at the top example 
here and you can see how tiny and de- 
tailed those brush stroke are compared 
with the strokes below when you set 
the size (thickness) much larger. Totally 
different look. 



Step Six: 

Okay, the last Brush slider should be 
called the Sharpness slider, as it makes 
the overall image look sharper or softer 
in how it affects the brush. Dragging it 
to the left takes away the detail of the 
brush bristles, so it's very soft, smooth, 
and undefined (like you see here at the 
top). Dragging to the right gives it a 
harder, more detailed look that makes 
the image look sharper, as you really 
see the bristles in the stroke now. Just 
for the record, I'm glad there are only 
four sliders here. :) Now, on to the 
two lighting controls. 




Brush Scale (thickness) set to 10 



Brush Scale (thickness) set to 0.1 



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Styiizatiqn 






|s 


Cleanliness 






|s 


Scale 




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Bristle Detail 






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Cleanliness 


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Scale 




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— Brush 

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Cleanliness 


|s 


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Is 1 


Bristle Detail 




Po— 1 


* 



► 292 Chapter 9 Special Effects for Photographers 



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1*1^ 



- ** A H 



Lighting Angular Direction set to 90' 





Lighting Angular Direction set to 241.2 




— Lighting 






Angular Direction 


2 41.2 


5hlrie 




FH 


* 



Lighting Shine set to 




Lighting Shine set to 5 (the midway point) 



Step Seven: 

There are two sliders in the Lighting 
section: The Angular Direction slider 
controls the angle of the light hitting 
your painting. When it's a direction of 
light, Adobe usually gives us a round 
dial-like controller (like the one in the 
Bevel & Emboss section of the Layer 
Style dialog), but here, they just went 
with a regular ol' slider. The best way 
to totally "get" this slider is to just drag 
it back and forth a few times and you'll 
totally get what it does, because the 
light changes as you drag from to 
360 degrees. 



Step Eight: 

The last slider in this section is the Shine 
amount, and it controls how the light 
reflects. Dragging it to the left makes 
your image very flat-looking (as seen 
here, at top), and dragging over to the 
right adds contrast to the highlights and 
shadows, and kind of makes the paint 
look thicker, almost like it's embossed. 
I only dragged halfway here, to a setting 
of 5, because it looked so bad at a set- 
ting of 10 that I was afraid you'd look at 
it and think, "Okay, I'm never going to 
touch that slider." It actually has a nice 
effect, and of course, the setting amount 
(as always) depends on the image you're 
applying it to. 



(Continued) 



Special Effects for Photographers Chapter 9 293 i 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Nine: 

Now that I've messed with all the sliders, 
I'm going to go back and put them where 
I think they look good for this particular 
image (if I do an oil painting effect, I really 
want it to look painted — I don't go for the 
subtle look with this). However, once you 
click OK and the filter is applied to your 
image, if you think it's a little too heavy (or 
you just want a little more realism back in 
your painting), you don't have to go back 
and mess with the sliders again. Instead, 
immediately go under the Edit menu and 
choose Fade Oil Paint. This brings up 
the Fade dialog (shown here below), and 
the best way I can describe it is it's kind 
of like "Undo on a slider." So, if you drag 
the Opacity slider to the left, it lowers the 
intensity of the effect. If you drag it to 
0%, it removes it altogether. Try drag- 
ging it to 70% (as shown here), and 30% 
of the original image comes back, bring- 
ing in a hint of the original look and detail. 
A before/after is shown below. 




Fade 


Opacity: 




70 % ( OK ) 


Mode: 1 Normal 


1* Q Cancel } 




3 Preview 




Before 



After 



► 294 Chapter 9 Special Effects for Photographers 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



This new Blur filter in CS6 gives you a really easy way to create the minia- 
turization effect you see all over the web, where a photo is transformed to 

look like a tinytoy model (well, think of it more like an architectural model). 

Using this filter is easy if (this is a big if) you have the right type of photo. 

Ideally, you'd use one where you photographed from a high point of view, 

looking downward, and the higher you are, and the steeper the angle, the 

better it helps sell the idea that you're looking down on a scale model. 



Tilt Shift Effect (Using 
the New Blur Gallery) 



Photoshop File Edit Image Layer Type Select 



3D View Vi 



Convert for Smart Filters 




- nus»nftnmfr*5xm&gm 




Step One: 

Open the image you want to apply 
the effect to (be sure to read the intro 
above to make sure you use the right 
type of image, or this effect will look 
pretty lame. Of course, as always, you 
can download the image I'm using here 
from the book's downloads page men- 
tioned in the introduction). Now, go 
under the Filter menu, under Blur, and 
choose Tilt-Shift (as shown here). 



Step Two: 

When you use any of the three filters in 
this section of the Blur submenu, you're 
using what Adobe calls the Blur Gallery, 
which is an entirely new, interactive, on- 
screen way to work with your images. 
You'll notice it places a round pin in the 
center of your image, and above and 
below that are two solid lines, and then 
two dotted lines. The solid lines show 
you the area that will remain in focus 
(the focus area), and the area between 
each solid line and dotted line is transi- 
tion, where it fades from sharp to blurry. 
The wider the distance between the solid 
and dotted lines, the longer it takes to 
go from sharp (inside the solid line) to 
totally blurry (outside the dotted line). 
Note: To remove a pin, just click on it 
and hit the Delete (PC: Backspace) key 
on your keyboard. 

(Continued) 



Special Effects for Photographers 



Chapter 9 



295 < 



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for Digital Photographers 



Step Three: 

You control the amount of blur by click- 
ing on the gray part of the ring around 
the pin, and dragging around the ring. 
As you drag, the ring turns white to show 
you how far you've gone, and the actual 
amount of blur appears in a little pop- 
up display at the top of the ring (as seen 
here). I totally dig adjusting the blur this 
way, but if it gets on your nerves (hey, it 
could happen), there is a Blur Tools panel 
that appears over on the right side of your 
workspace with a Tilt-Shift section. You'll 
see a Blur slider there, so if you want to go 
"old school," you can drag that slider and 
use it to choose how much blur you want. 
In our example, I clicked-and-dragged the 
ring (the Blur amount) to 39. While we're 
here, look inside the two horizontal solid 
lines. See how that area is sharp and in 
focus? Okay, now look at the area out- 
side those lines until you reach the dotted 
lines. See how it transitions to blurry? 
Got it? Got it! 



Step Four: 

For this particular miniaturization effect, 
I think it looks better if you compress both 
of these areas — making the in-focus area 
smaller and the transition area smaller. 
Here's how: Click directly on the top solid 
line and drag inward toward the round pin 
thingy in the middle (and yes, thingy is the 
official name given by the International 
Board of Unsure Naming, or the IBUN). 
Get it nice and close (as seen here). Now, 
do the same thing with the bottom solid 
line, moving it up toward the round pin 
thingy. Next, drag the center of the top 
dotted line in closer to the top solid line 
(as shown here), and then do the same to 
the bottom dotted line. 




D 




□ 




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»"<"> 




Step Five: 

Now, we're going to rotate our in-focus 
area (and blur, and the whole shebang), 
so we're just focused on the area we want 
(which, in my case, is the stairs and bridge 
near the bottom-center of the photo, as 
shown here). First, click directly on the 
center of the round pin thingy and drag 
it over to that area (put it right near those 
stairs). Now, to rotate your Tilt-Shift blur, 
move your cursor over the white center 
dot on the solid line above the pin, and 
you'll see it turn into a two-headed ro- 
tate arrow. Just click-and-hold on that 
white dot and rotate by dragging your 
cursor left/right. So now, it's pretty close 
to being where and how we want it, but 
there are some more options you'll want 
to know about: The first is over in the 
Blur Tools panel, under Tilt-Shift, and it's 
the Distortion slider. It lets you change 
the shape of the blur (I thought it looked 
best over at 100%, as shown here). Once 
you add Distortion, if you turn on the 
Symmetric Distortion checkbox, it makes 
your blur look really bad and distorted. 
I personally haven't come up with a 
reason why I would ever turn this on, 
unless I was angry at my photo. I also 
increased my Blur to 50 px. 

Step Six: 

There is another set of controls in 
the Blur Effects panel (shown here; it 
appears below the Blur Tools panel): The 
top one is kind of useful — it lets you in- 
crease the highlights in the blur area, 
which can be nice for some outdoor por- 
traits, so I dragged it up a bit here (notice 
the brighter highlights in the top left?). 
However, this is a very sensitive slider, 
and if you drag too far, it looks like some- 
one dropped a highlights grenade into 
your image, so use this sparingly. There's 
a Bokeh Color slider that adds color to 
your blur and depending on the image, 
it's either very subtle or a little visible, but 
like the Symmetric Distortion checkbox, 
I don't use it. 

(Continued) 



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Chapter 9 



297 < 



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Step Seven: 

When you're done tweaking your blur, 
press the Return (PC: Enter) key to apply 
it. There are a few more controls in the 
Options Bar: One is the Focus amount, 
and it's set at 100% (sharp focus) by de- 
fault. If you lower that amount, it makes 
the in-focus area start to blur. The more 
you lower that amount, the blurrier the 
in-focus area gets (I haven't found a use 
for this one yet). Next is the Save Mask to 
Channels checkbox, which lets you save 
the area you've masked (using this tool) to 
a channel (in the Channels panel) in case 
you want to edit it later (like adding noise 
to it, or removing all the color, etc.). You 
can reload that channel and the masked 
area becomes selected. Lastly, there's 
a High Quality checkbox, which gives 
you a better quality blur, but it just takes 
longer to apply. By the way, if you want 
to actually see the mask this filter is build- 
ing, press-and-hold the letter M on your 
keyboard (you can see what the mask 
looks like here at the bottom). Some 
other handy shortcuts: Press P to hide the 
blur (press it again to bring it back), and 
press-and-hold H to hide your round pin 
thingy and all the lines from view. 



Q 



TSr-' 

(ill V ifl :.:<; | 10 -Kt.a Vi 






Before 



After 



► 298 



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for Digital Photographers 



This is a really cool feature, because it lets you add a super-shallow 

depth-of-field effect to your image after the fact, and it lets you 

place the focus point, and the blur, right where you want it (but 

doesn't give you the miniature effect like the Tilt-Shift Blur does). 



Iris & Field Blur 
(or How to Fake the 
85mm f/1. 4 Look) 



Photoshop File Edit Image Layer Type Select 
r* ™, r> 



3D View Wn. 





Step One: 

Start by opening the photo you want to 
add a background blur to (like you shot it 
at a wide-open aperture, like f/1. 8 or f/1 .4). 
Now, go under the Filter menu, under 
Blur, and choose Iris Blur (as shown here). 
The background behind the bride in this 
image is a tiny bit blurry, but we want to 
make it a lot blurrier, so she stands out 
from the background much more. 



Step Two: 

When you choose Iris Blur, it adds a pin 
to the center of your photo, and that pin 
represents the center of the area that's 
going to be in focus. Our bride here is 
to the left of center, so click directly on 
that center pin and drag it so it's over 
the bride (after all, she's what we want in 
focus). You'll notice it places four round 
white dots around the center pin, and a 
solid oval-shaped line outside of those 
dots. The four round white dots show 
you the area that will remain in focus (the 
focus area), and the area between those 
dots and the solid oval-shaped line is 
the transition area, where it fades from 
sharp to blurry. The wider the distance 
between those white dots and the solid 
oval, the longer it takes to go from sharp 
to blurry (the totally blurry area is any- 
thing outside that solid oval). 

(Continued) 



Special Effects for Photographers 



Chapter 9 



299 < 



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for Digital Photographers 



Step Three: 

We want our focus squarely on the bride, 
so we're going to make our oval thinner 
(so it's closer to her body), and we're go- 
ing to rotate it to the left so it matches 
her pose. To shrink in the sides of the oval, 
click on the small dot on the right side of 
it and drag inward toward the bride. Now, 
take that same point and drag upward a 
bit, and it rotates the oval (as shown here). 
Our goal is to get the bride's face and 
her bouquet in focus, so click along the 
bottom of the oval and drag it straight 
downward to stretch it out, until one white 
focus dot is on her forehead and one is 
on the bouquet (as seen here). You can 
reshape this oval any time, and rotate it, 
to fit whatever shape you need (within the 
constraints of an oval, of course). 



Step Four: 

If you look at the image in Step Three, 
you'll notice that the top of her head is 
still a bit blurry, and the area below her 
bouquet is blurry, too. If you like that 
look — you're done. However, if you want 
those areas to be in focus, as well, you 
can add more blur pins to those areas. 
Click once on her forehead and it adds 
another blur controller. Shrink the oval 
way down until it just covers her head. 
Now, click one more time under her bou- 
quet to add another blur controller, scale 
it down so it fits, and drag it right where 
you want it (as shown here). You could 
even add another one or two on her veil 
(and position them as tall, thin ovals). 





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Step Five: 

Here, I clicked a few more times to get 
all of our bride in focus (but I like how 
her right side goes out of focus, more 
like a real f/1.4 lens effect would, so I'm 
leaving that side — the farthest away from 
the camera — to go blurry). Now that all 
the pins are in place, let's increase the 
amount of Blur from 15 to 24 in the Blur 
Tools panel (as shown here). Look how 
much blurrierthe background looks now 
and how much separation it gives the 
bride from the background. So, how long 
did all those blur pins take to create? 
Just seconds. Each one takes one click 
to create and one or two clicks to posi- 
tion, so don't let all those dots on the 
bride throw you — this is easy stuff. One 
last thing: once you hit the Return (PC: 
Enter) key to apply your blur effect, you 
can control the amount of blur after the 
fact by immediately going under the 
Edit menu and choosing Fade Iris Blur. 
Lower the Opacity to around 70% and 
see how that looks (pretty sweet, right?). 
Below is a before/after, but we're going 
to move on to another blur filter now. 




Before 



After 



(Continued) 



Special Effects for Photographers Chapter 9 301 ^ 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Six: 

By the way, in case you missed the Tilt- 
Shift project earlier in the chapter, here 
are some shortcuts that you'll find handy: 
press-and-hold the letter M on your key- 
board to see the mask of your blur (you 
can see a capture of what the mask looks 
like back in the Tilt-Shift project), press P 
to hide the blur (press it again to bring it 
back), and press-and-hold H to hide your 
round pin thingy and any lines or dots 
from view. Also, check Step Seven from 
that same project for more Blur Gallery 
tips. Okay, on to Field Blur. Open a new 
image and choose Field Blur from the 
Filter menu, under Blur. It places a pin in 
the center of your photo that totally blurs 
it entirely. Well, it's a start. For this image, 
drag the pin over onto the roses. 



Step Seven: 

Next, click on the rings. Still blurry? Yup. 
Luckily, you can control these two pins 
separately, so either click-and-drag on 
that gray-and-white ring around the pin 
on the rings, or go to the Blur Tools panel 
and drag the Blur slider all the way to the 
left to (zero; as shown here), and now 
the rings are in sharp focus, but the roses 
are still blurry. That's the way Field Blur 
works — you place points and decide if the 
area where you placed them will be sharp 
or blurry, and if you choose blurry, you 
get to choose just how blurry. 





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Step Eight: 

The default amount of blur is 15 pixels, 
and that might work for the bride's purse 
in the background on the right, because 
it's farther back, but the roses are closer 
to the ring box. So, click on the pin on the 
roses, then go to the Blur Tools panel and 
lower the Blur slider to just 10 px (as seen 
here), and now the roses aren't quite as 
blurry. Now, click directly on the purse in 
the back right (ya know, now that we've 
brought it up) to add a new pin, and it 
gets a 15-px blur by default. So, we have 
three different controls in this image: 
(1) on the purse on the right in the back, 
a very blurry pin; (2) the rings have no 
blur, as their pin's Blur slider is set to 0; 
and (3) the roses are 33% less blurry than 
the purse. 



Step Nine: 

Okay, so how would you blur the small 
area in front of the ring box? Well, there's 
a trick for that: First, you'll need to change 
your Zoom tool settings (in the Options 
Bar) so the Resize Windows to Fit check- 
box is off, then you can press Command— 
(minus sign; PC: Ctrl—) to reduce the 
image size, but not the window size, so 
you can see the canvas area around your 
image. Believe it or not, you can click the 
Field Blur tool out in this canvas area to 
add a blurry point. Here, I added one just 
outside the image, and the edges of the 
blur spill onto the image (just below the 
ring box) to give us the final image. 



(Continued) 



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Before 




After 



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The Lighting Effects filter has been in Photoshop for as long as I can remember, but it 

has needed a major update since about 15 minutes after that, and in Photoshop CS6, 

it got a complete makeover. It's basically a filter that creates lighting right where 

you want it, with different styles of lighting, and to be able to do that, it has to 

darken the rest of your photo first, and then it lights the one (or more) areas you 

choose. The interface also uses some of the new interactivity that Adobe has 

introduced in CS6, so besides being better, now it's just plain fun to use, too! 



Creating 
Dramatic 
Lighting 



- - Dramatic Light.jpg @ 66.7% (Layer 1, RGB/S) 




Step One: 

Open the image you want to add 
dramatic lighting to (in the image shown 
here, the lighting on our subject is pretty 
decent, but there's so much ambient 
[existing] light in the room that it's not 
very dramatic. Of course, I should have 
done this in-camera by raising my shutter 
speed to 1/200 or 1/250 of a second to 
make the background darker, but sadly 
I didn't, so now I have to do this trick). 
I always start by duplicating the Back- 
ground layer (you'll see why in just a few 
steps), so press Command-J (PC: Ctrl-J). 
To make it so we can go back and edit 
this filter later, go under the Filter menu 
and choose Convert for Smart Filters. 
This makes your top layer a smart object 
(you can see the little page icon in the 
bottom-right corner of the layer's thumb- 
nail), and adds your filter below it in the 
Layers panel, where you can double-click 
on it to re-open and tweak it later. 



(Continued) 



Special Effects for Photographers Chapter 9 305 i 



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Step Two: 

Go under the Filter menu, under Render, 
and choose Lighting Effects. The Tool- 
box gets hidden (you don't need it), a 
new Lights panel appears on the right, 
the Properties panel shows the Lighting 
Effects controls, and we have new options 
in the Options Bar. Also, you can see that 
it has greatly darkened your entire image 
and put a spotlight in place. If all this looks 
kind of intimidating, I've got good news: 
you can choose to ignore almost all of 
it and just use the built-in presets at the 
left end of the Options Bar. When you 
click on the Presets pop-up menu, a list 
of predesigned lights (including multiple- 
light scenarios) appears (you're just seeing 
the default spotlight effect here). 



Step Three: 

For the dramatic lighting look, my favor- 
ite preset is Flashlight (it uses the Point 
style of light, which is a perfect circle of 
light, rather than the large, oval shape 
of the Spot Light style). When you chose 
Flashlight from the Presets menu, you 
get this soft, round spotlight, and to po- 
sition it where you want it, just click right 
in the center of it (you'll see a little HUD 
[Heads Up Display] appear with the word 
"Move"), and drag it where you want it. 
Here I dragged it over onto our subject. 




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. Dramatic Light.jpg @ 66.7% (Light Effects, HCB/8J * 




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Step Four: 

Her face should be the brightest part of 
the portrait, but the light on her face is 
a little too bright. Luckily, you can con- 
trol the intensity of the light without hav- 
ing to mess with any sliders — you do it 
right on the image itself. The little black/ 
white circular ring that appears just out- 
side the center of your light controls the 
intensity of the light. Click on it and the 
HUD will display "Intensity" and the cur- 
rent amount of Intensity ranging from to 
100. To lower the amount a bit, click right 
on that circle and drag in a counter-clock- 
wise motion, and it lowers the brightness 
(Intensity) of the light (as seen here, where 
it appears that the light starts on her face 
and falls off to darkness quickly. 



Step Five: 

Of course, the light will spill outside 
your subject's face onto the background 
quite a bit, but you can control the size 
(Adobe calls it the "Scale") of the round 
beam of light, using the outermost ring 
(the really big green one). Move your 
cursor right over it and it turns yellow 
and the HUD displays "Scale" and the 
amount, from to 100 (as seen here), 
and then just drag inward/outward to 
resize the beam. I have to tell you, this 
green ring is kind of finicky and it might 
take you moving your cursor over it a 
few times really slowly to finally get the 
yellow Scale ring to appear, so don't 
let it get you frustrated if it doesn't work 
the first time — just give it another try or 
two. These three onscreen controls work 
pretty much the same for the rest of the 
lights, except for Spotlight — there, the 
outer-ring controls rotation (as shown 
here at the bottom), but you can click 
on the white dots to move it. 



(Continued) 



Special Effects for Photographers Chapter 9 307 i 



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Step Six: 

To add more lights, click on one of the 
three light styles up in the Options Bar. 
Add a Point Light (shown circled here in 
red) and drag it over near the concrete 
block she's sitting on. Drag the Scale 
circle inward, until the size of the beam 
is very small (as seen here), and lower 
the Intensity quite a bit. Create another 
Point Light and do the same, but drag it 
down by her ankle (as seen here). 

TIP: Deleting Lights 

To delete a light, click on it, then go 
over to the Lights panel on the right 
side of your workspace and click on the 
Trash icon in the bottom-right corner. 
It won't let you delete all the lights — 
it makes you leave one there (or your 
image would just be black). 



Step Seven: 

In the Lights panel, you'll see all your 
lights listed, kind of like layers. You can 
toggle them on/off here by clicking on 
the Eye icon to the left of each light. 
Also, if you want to change the style of 
light, click on it, then choose a new style 
from the pop-up menu in the Properties 
panel, which should be above the Lights 
panel. We haven't really talked about the 
Infinite Light (the third light style), so go 
ahead and create an Infinite light (click on 
the third Lights icon in the Options Bar), 
and then hide the other three from view 
in the Lights panel by clicking on their 
Eye icons. This light stays in the center of 
your image — it doesn't move, so like the 
sun, all you can do is change its direction 
(click-and-drag directly on the dot in the 
center, and you'll see the light icon near 
the edge of your image move; it's fun to 
see how it shows the light in a 3D space). 



v -:n o ; 





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: 



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Step Eight: 

There are a few other controls you'll want 
to know about in the Properties panel: (1) 
To change the color of your light, click on 
the Color swatch and choose a new color 
from the Color Picker (as seen here, on 
the Infinite Light). (2) The Intensity slider is 
the same as the one you use right on the 
image itself. (3) The Hotspot slider con- 
trols the hot spot (most intense center of 
the light) if you use the Spot Light style 
of light. (4) The Colorize swatch actually 
controls the color cast of the darkened 
part of your photo (by default, it's flat). 
(5) The Exposure slider reminds me of the 
Highlights slider in Camera Raw, so if I use 
it at all, it's usually dragging it to the left 
to pull back highlights. (6) The Ambience 
slider controls the amount of darkening it 
applies to the rest of the image (more on 
the next page). 

Step Nine: 

(7) Right below the Ambience slider is the 
Texture pop-up menu, which lets you ac- 
centuate the texture in your image with 
kind of an embossed look, on a per color 
basis (Red, Green, or Blue channel), and 
you control the amount using the Height 
slider right below it. Try it and you'll see 
what I mean. I skipped over the two con- 
trols I use the least: the Gloss slider (which 
theoretically controls the amount of shine 
to the photo, but it seems to me like more 
of a contrast control — dragging to the left 
makes the lit part of your image flatter and 
less contrasty, and to the right makes it a 
bit more contrasty and harsh. The Metallic 
slider only seems to do anything when 
you have something metallic or reflective 
in your image, so if you do, dragging it 
to the right makes it more intense. When 
you're done, click the OK button in the 
Options Bar, and it applies the effect to 
your layer as a smart filter (as seen here). 
If you want to remove some of the effect, 
you can paint on the mask that comes with 
it, or double-click on Lighting Effects to 
re-open the filter and tweak the settings. 

(Continued) 



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Chapter 9 



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Step 10: 

If you look at the image seen here, you'll 
notice that the light on her face is pretty 
bright and direct, which is fine, but you 
can make this blend in a little better and 
look less harsh with just one click (that's 
why, at the very beginning, I suggested 
you duplicate the Background layer — so 
we can apply this final finishing move). 
To soften that light, in the Layers panel, 
change the blend mode of this layer from 
Normal to Darken (as shown here), and it 
takes the "edge" off that main light and 
makes it softer-looking with a smoother 
blend, which completes the effect. One 
last thing: another benefit of having ap- 
plied this effect on a layer is that you can 
control the overall amount of the effect 
after the fact. For example, if you think the 
background is too dark and too dramatic 
now, you can simply lower the Opacity 
of this layer and it lowers the intensity of 
the effect. 



. Dramatic light.jpg :'■< 66.796 (Layer 1, RGB/S) * 





After 



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One of the most under-used adjustment layers has got to be the Gradient Map. 

For years, I've only used it for one thing — it makes a pretty mean black-and-white 

conversion in just one click (well, provided that your Foreground color is black and 

your Background color is white, so it might technically take one letter and one click). 

Anyway, in Photoshop CS6, Adobe worked with photographer Steve Weinrebe 

to add 38 photo-toning and split-toning presets to the Gradient Map feature, 

making it an even better tool that nobody uses. I hope that changes today. 



Photo Toning Effects 




Vibranre... 
Hue /Saturation... 
Colas Balance... 
Black & White... 
Photo Filter- 
Channel Miser... 
Color Lookup- 
Invert 
Posterize... 
Threshold... 




Step One: 

Open the photo you want to apply a 
photo toning effect to. Then, go to the 
Layers panel and click on the Create New 
Adjustment Layer icon at the bottom of 
the panel, and choose Gradient Map 
from the pop-up menu (as shown here), 
or you can click on the last icon, on the 
bottom row, of the Adjustments panel. 



Step Two: 

As soon as you choose Gradient Map, 
it applies the default gradient, which as 
I said above, makes a pretty darn sweet 
one-click B&W image (as long as your 
Foreground and Background colors are 
set to black/white, respectively, before 
you choose Gradient Map). Okay, to be 
able to load the Photo Toning presets, 
you need to go to the Properties panel 
and click directly on the gradient itself 
(as shown here). 



(Continued) 



Special Effects for Photographers Chapter 9 31 "M 



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Step Three: 

This brings up the Gradient Editor (seen 
here), and if you click on the little "gear" 
icon at the top-right corner of the Presets 
section, a pop-up menu appears. Choose 
Photographic Toning from this menu (as 
shown here). A dialog will appear asking if 
you want to replace the current default set 
of gradients with the ones you are loading. 
I chose yes, because (1) it's easier to work 
with them if they're not added to the ex- 
isting set, and (2) I'm going to show you a 
one-click way to get the default gradients 
back any time you want, in just a moment. 
So, for now, click OK to hide the default 
gradients and load the new set. 



Step Four: 

Once they're loaded, now the fun 
begins, because all you have to do is 
click on any one of these photographic 
toning gradients, and it updates your 
image live, so you can just start clicking 
until you find one you like. Here's one 
called Sepia-Selenium 3 — you can see 
the colors that make up the look in the 
gradient ramp that appears in the mid- 
dle of the Gradient Editor dialog 
(seen here). 



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Step Five: 

So, now you're pretty much window 
shopping for the look you like — click a 
gradient, and if it's not the look you're 
looking for, click the next one. For ex- 
ample, here's the last gradient in the 
set, Cobalt-Iron 3 (perhaps not my first 
choice, but I did want to show you the 
variety of what's here, and this one has 
more of a split-tone look, with one color 
in the shadows [a cyan tone] and one in 
the highlights [more of a magenta]). Make 
sure you try out some of the ones in the 
top row — there are some really useful 
duotone/sepiatone looks up there, and 
like most Adobe presets, the best, most- 
useful ones are near the beginning, and 
the farther they are down on the list, the 
less useful they are. 



Step Six: 

Okay, here's why you never have to worry 
about replacing the default gradients — 
you're just one click away from them at 
any time. Just go to the Gradient Editor, 
click on the gear icon, and from the pop- 
up menu, choose Reset Gradients, and it 
reloads just the default gradient set. Now 
that you know the defaults are always just 
one click away, I hope that encourages 
you to load some of the other sets and 
check them out, as well. 



Special Effects for Photographers 



Chapter 9 



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Color Lookup Effects 



Another special effect added in Photoshop CS6 is called "Color Lookup." It uses 
built-in Color Lookup tables to instantly remap the colors in your image to create 
some pretty cool color effects (inspired by the lookup tables used in movie making 
and video). There aren't a lot of controls to play around with — most of these are pretty 
much "one-trick ponies," where you choose a look and you either like the effect or 
not — but what's nice is it's available as an adjustment layer, so you can control where 
the effect is applied pretty easily by just painting it on or off. Here's how it works: 



Step One: 

Open the photo you want to apply a 
Color Lookup effect to. Then, go to the 
Layers panel, click on the Create New 
Adjustment Layer icon at the bottom of 
the panel, and choose Color Lookup 
from the pop-up menu (as shown here), 
or you can click on the last icon in the 
second row of the Adjustments panel. 
This opens the Color Lookup options in 
the Properties panel (shown here). There 
are three different sets of effects, and you 
choose the one you want from any of the 
three pop-up menus (you can only choose 
one at a time). 



Step Two: 

I chose EdgyAmber.3DL from the 3DLUT 
File pop-up menu, and it applied the 
color effect you see here. At this point, 
there are three things you can do: (1) if 
the effect seems too intense, since this 
is an adjustment layer, you can lower the 
layer's Opacity and it lowers the inten- 
sity of the effect; (2) you can change the 
layer's blend mode to control how this 
effect blends with the image on the layer 
below it; or (3) you can press Command-I 
(PC: Ctrl-I) to Invert the layer mask, which 
hides the effect behind a black layer 
mask, then take the Brush tool (B) and, 
with your Foreground color set to white, 
just paint the effect right where you 
want it to appear. 



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Step Three: 

There are a few effects that have extra 
options. For example, from the same 
pop-up menu, choose Night From Day 

.CUBE and some new options appear 
at the bottom of the Properties panel 
(shown here). Since they're radio buttons, 
all you can do is choose one button on 
the left and one on the right, and as you 
click on them (as shown here), they cre- 
ate variations of the look you chose. Also, 
there are a few handy buttons across the 
bottom of the Properties panel: The one 
I use the most is the Eye icon, which tog- 
gles the Color Lookup adjustment layer 
on/off (and saves you a trip up to the 
Layers panel). If you click on the first icon 
from the left, it makes the effect only 
affect the layer directly below it (and not 
all the layers below it, like normal). The 
next icon over (the eye with an arrow) is 
a before/after, which is pretty similar to 
turning the layer on/off with the Eye icon. 
The next icon (the curved arrow) just re- 
sets the entire panel to its defaults. 



Step Four: 

After trying out a few different ones, 
I think for this particular image the one 
that looks best to me is Crisp_Warm.look 
(as shown here). One last thing: If you 
choose the top choice in any of these 
pop-up menus, it lets you load in a profile 
(in case you downloaded some from the 
web and wanted to apply one of them 
to your image). It brings up the standard 
Open dialog, so you can find the profile 
you want to load. Of course, if you don't 
have a profile you want to load, there's 
no reason to choose the top choice in 
the menus (which makes you wonder 
why it's not the last choice in each 
menu, right? Don't get me started). 



Special Effects for Photographers 



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Sculpting Using the 
Updated Liquify Filter 



This is another filter Adobe updated in Photoshop CS6, and although it's probably 
most often used in portrait retouching (I used it quite a lot in my portrait retouching 
techniques book), I did want you to know that: (a) it is much, much faster and more re- 
sponsive in CS6, because they handed the heavy lifting off to the Graphics Processing 
Unit (geek speak); and (b) they tweaked lots of little things to make it better and easier 
to use; plus (c) they added an incredibly helpful new feature that lets you go back and 
pick up where you left off (very clever). So, here's a quick retoucharoo: 



Step One: 

Open the image you want to retouch 
(here, we have a nice headshot), then go 
under the Filter menu and choose Liquify 
(or press Command-Shift-X [PC: Ctrl- 

Shift-X]) 7 which brings up the dialog you 
see here. In Photoshop CS6, there are 
two versions of this dialog: an Advanced 
Mode version, and the simplified version 
you see here, with just a few tools on the 
left, and just the Brush Size and Pressure 
settings on the right side. For most of 
what we wind up doing, the simplified 
version is pretty much all we need (we do 
most of our work using the Forward Warp 
tool — the top tool in the Toolbox), so turn 
off the Advanced Mode checkbox. 

TIP: Visual Brush Resizing in Liquify 

If you want to quickly jump up to a much 
larger or down to a smaller brush size, on 
a Mac, press-and-hold Option-Ctrl, and 
click-and-drag your cursor to resize it on- 
screen. On a PC, press-and-hold the Alt 
key, and then Right-click-and-drag. 

Step Two: 

The Forward Warp tool moves your sub- 
ject around like they were a thick liquid 
(like molasses), but the secrets to using 
it effectively are: (1) make your brush size 
the size of what you want to move, and 
(2) make subtle movements with it (just 
kind of nudge things around, and you'll 
get great results). So, take the tool, place 
the center crosshair just to the left of her 
cheek on the left, and nudge it over to the 
right to tuck it in a bit (as shown here). 




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Step Three: 

Then, do the same thing to the cheek on 
the right (keeping in mind our tip about 
making the brush size the size of what 
you want to move). Now, let's tuck her ear 
on the right side in a bit, as well. You can 
change the size of your brush using the 
Brush Size slider over on the right, but 
honestly, it's easier to use the keyboard 
shortcuts. The Left Bracket key makes 
the brush smaller; the Right Bracket key 
makes it larger (they're to the right of the 
letter "?" on your keyboard). By the way, 
our subject here really doesn't need her 
cheeks moved in, or her ear moved over, 
but if we didn't do something, this would 
be a really short project. 

TIP: If You Mess Up, Try This 

If you want to start over from scratch, 
click the Restore All button. If you want to 
just undo a step or two, you can use the 
same multiple undo shortcut you nor- 
mally use in Photoshop: every time you 
press Command-Option-Z (PC: Ctrl- 
Alt-Z), it undoes another step. 



Step Four: 

Long, extended necks are very popular 
for "beauty style" headshots like this, so 
let's make our brush really big (don't for- 
get the brush size shortcuts — either the 
visual one you learned after Step One, or 
the Bracket keys), and then gently tuck her 
neck on the right side over a bit (as shown 
here). Now, before we go to the next 
page, there is something I actually would 
do to this image in Liquify, and that is to 
round out her hair a bit. Take a look, espe- 
cially on the left side, at the indents along 
the edges — that is something I would def- 
initely fix, so let's do that in the next step. 

(Continued) 



Special Effects for Photographers 



Chapter 9 



317 ^ 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

Zoom in tight on that area of her hair 
(Liquify uses the same keyboard short- 
cuts for zooming in/out that you normally 
use in Photoshop — Command-+ [plus 
sign; PC: Ctrl-+] will zoom you in, and 
Command— [minus sign; PC: Ctrl—] will 
zoom you back out). Shrink your brush 
way down until it's the size of the little 
dent you want to push out to match the 
rest of her hair, and then do just that (try 
not to make it too perfect). Also, some- 
times you'll have to push out, and some- 
times you may have to push in to make it 
all fairly even. 

TIP: You Can Have Insane 
Brush Sizes 

In Photoshop CS6, Adobe increased the 

maximum brush size to 15,000 pixels, so 

if you're working with images from huge 

megapixel cameras, you're covered. 



Step Six: 

Now let's look at some of the hidden ad- 
vanced features, so turn the Advanced 
Mode checkbox back on, and those op- 
tions appear on the right side of the dia- 
log, and three extra tools are added to 
the Toolbox. The main feature of this 
Advanced Mode is the ability to freeze 
part of the image you don't want to 
move while you're moving areas right 
around it. For example, if you needed to 
make some really big adjustments to her 
cheeks or head structure, you could freeze 
her face, but leave the edges of her head 
unfrozen (as shown here, where I painted 
with the Freeze Mask tool [F; it's the sev- 
enth one down in the Toolbox]). So, go 
ahead and do that now. If you don't see 
the red mask area, in the View Options 
section, turn on the Show Mask checkbox, 
as seen here. To erase any area you acci- 
dentally painted over, switch to the Thaw 
Mask tool (D; it's the next tool down). 



..uu.N.^.W; .,.,.;.■ 




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► 318 



Chapter 9 



Special Effects for Photographers 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 




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Step Seven: 

When you're done, click OK, and your 
changes are applied (as shown here). Now, 
these changes are a bit over-the-top, but 
I didn't want to make them so subtle that 
you really couldn't see what we were ac- 
tually doing with this filter. Ready for that 
cool new CS6 feature I told you about ear- 
lier? Okay, here it is: Once you click OK 
and apply your changes, if you decide you 
don't like the way they look, of course you 
can just press Command-Z (PC: Ctrl-Z) 
to undo them, and then go back and try 
again in Liquify, right? Right. But, here's 
the cool thing: Liquify now remembers 
the last set of adjustments you made 
(called a "mesh"), and if you reopen the 
image, and then click the Load Last Mesh 
button (shown here at the bottom), it re- 
loads the last set of changes you made, 
so now you can pick up right where you 
left off. Also, if you shot on a tripod and 
your subject didn't move (or better yet, 
your subject was a product), you could 
save the mesh on the first one, then 
open the next shot, load the mesh from 
the previous shot, and be done with it 
in two clicks. 





Before 



After 



Special Effects for Photographers Chapter 9 319 i 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Night Lights 
Background Effect 



I learned this technique from my buddy, French photographer and Photoshop 
trainer Serge Ramelli (http://photoserge.com), and it uses the Iris Blur filter in 
Photoshop CS6 in a different way to take a nighttime photo and turn it into a 
great background for compositing. Many thanks to Serge for teaching me the 
technique, and for letting me share it with you. 



Step One: 

Start by opening an image of the subject 
you want to put on our night lights back- 
ground. Now, make a selection of your 
subject using the technique for removing 
people from their background (found 
on page 231), which is the technique I 
used here to select our subject playing 
bass guitar. 



Step Two: 

Next, we're going to open a photo taken 
at night where you can see lights (like the 
one shown here). With this technique, 
you don't actually want bright lights 
(they'll turn into white blobs), but in the 
shot I chose here, of course, there were 
some bright lights, but there's a quick fix 
for that. Open the image in Camera Raw 
(see the beginning of Chapter 2 if you 
need a refresher on that), and drag the 
Highlights slider way over to the left until 
the lights don't look so bright, as seen 
here, where I dragged the slider to -30 
(you can control the actual brightness of 
the lights later, but for now they need to 
be kind of "pulled back" in brightness). 
Then, click the Open Image button to 
open it into Photoshop. 




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► 320 



Chapter 9 



Special Effects for Photographers 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 





Step Three: 

Press Command— (minus sign; PC: Ctrl—) 
to zoom out a level. Now, grab the bot- 
tom-right corner of your image window 
and drag outward until you can see the 
gray canvas area surrounding your image. 
Then, go under the Filter menu, under 
Blur, and choose Iris Blur. This brings 
up the Iris Blur interface (seen here) and 
it puts a large oval in the center of your 
image — the area inside that oval is where 
it's clear, and the Iris blur appears out- 
side it. But what we want to do here is 
blur as much of the background as pos- 
sible, so what we're going to have to do 
next is shrink the oval way down and 
drag it off the image, so it doesn't leave 
any part of the image clear. Grab one of 
the side points of the oval and drag it 
inward to make it a tall, thin oval (as seen 
here on the bottom left). Then, grab ei- 
ther the top or bottom point on the oval 
and drag inward to shrink the oval down 
to a small circle (like what you see here 
on the bottom right). 



Step Four: 

Then, click in the center of the circle 
and drag it right off the image into the 
upper-left corner of the window (as shown 
here). By moving it outside your image 
like this, none of the image will be clear 
(it all gets blurred). Next, go to the Blur 
Effects panel on the right, under the 
Bokeh section, and drag the Light Bokeh 
slider over to the right to 50%. This slider 
controls how bright the blurry lights are, 
so depending on the photo, you might 
have to make this darker (or even brighter), 
but just make sure the lights don't get 
crazy bright. 

(Continued) 



Special Effects for Photographers 



Chapter 9 



321 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

To make the lights in the background 
larger, in the Blur Tools panel, you can 
drag the Blur slider to the right, like I did 
here, where I dragged it over to 56 pixels. 
So, you can think of the Blur slider as con- 
trolling the size of the night lights. 



Step Six: 

Once I made the lights much larger, they 
also seemed a lot dimmer, but as I men- 
tioned in Step Four, the Light Bokeh slider 
controls the brightness of the lights, 
so let's crank that up to around 65% (as 
seen here), which makes the lights quite 
a bit brighter. However, take a look at 
the lights on the left center, and how 
they've gotten so bright they've kind 
of "bloomed" and run together. Once 
we paste our subject into this spot, we'll 
either move her away from that side of 
the image, or we'll have to position her in 
front of that area, so you don't see that. 
Now that your blur looks good, go up to 
the Options Bar and click the blue OK 
button to apply your blur to the image. 



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► 322 



Chapter 9 



Special Effects for Photographers 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 





Step Seven: 

Go back to the document where you 
have your subject selected and press 
Command-C (PC: Ctrl-C) to copy your 
subject into memory, then switch to 
your background document and press 
Command-V (PC: Ctrl-V) to paste your 
subject into the background (or you can 
just get the Move tool [V] and drag- 
and-drop the layer your subject is on 
over onto your background document). 
I positioned our subject away from the 
blooming bright white light also found 
on the far right, and I made her a little 
bit larger by using Free Transform (press 
Command-T [PC: Ctrl-T], then Shift- 
click on one of the top corner points 
and drag it upward to scale her up just 
a small amount. If you drag too far, she 
will start to look pixelated, so be careful 
not to scale her up too much). 



Step Eight: 

Lastly, to make your subject look more 
like she was shot on this warm-colored 
background, we're going to warm that 
photo of her up a little bit, too. Start by 
going to the Layers panel and Command- 
clicking (PC: Ctrl-clicking) directly on the 
thumbnail for your subject's layer to put 
a selection around them. Now, go to the 
Adjustments panel and click on the Photo 
Filter icon. When the Properties panel 
opens with the Photo Filter controls, by 
default it warms the photo at an amount 
of 25%, but if you think it needs to be a 
little more or less warm, drag the Density 
slider to the right to make it warmer, or left 
to make it not quite as warm (I dragged it 
to 19% here). 



Special Effects for Photographers 



Chapter 9 



323 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Photoshop Killer Tips 



How to Open Multiple JPEGs 
or TIFFs in Camera Raw from 
Mini Bridge 

Opening multiple RAW photos from Mini 
Bridge is easy — just select as many as 
you want, and then double-click on any 
one or Right-click and choose Default 
Application under Open With. The prob- 
lem is that doesn't work for JPEG or TIFF 
images. That is, unless you do these two 
things first: (1) Go under the Photoshop 
(PC: Edit) menu, under Preferences, and 
choose Camera Raw. Then, at the bot- 
tom of the dialog, in the JPEG and TIFF 
Handling section, change both pop-up 
menus to Automatically Open All 
Supported JPEGs/TIFFs (luckily, you only 
have to do this part once). Now, restart 
Photoshop, then go select multiple JPEG 
or TIFF images in Mini Bridge, Right-click 
on any one and, under Open With, choose 
Default Application, and they'll all open 
in Camera Raw. 



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CS6 Tip for Wacom Tablet Users 

If you use a Wacom tablet for retouching, 
there are two buttons that keep you from 
having to jump to the Brushes panel when 
you need to control pressure-sensitive 
opacity or size. These two buttons appear 



in the Options Bar when you have a brush 
tool selected (they look like circles with a 
pen on them), and clicking them overrides 
the current settings in the Brushes panel, 
so it saves you a trip to the Opacity or Size 
controls to turn those two on first. 



If Photoshop Starts 
Acting Weird... 

or something doesn't work the way it 
always did, chances are that your pref- 
erences have become corrupt, which 



Adobe Photoshop 




pens to just about everyone at one time 
or another, and replacing them with a new 
factory-fresh set of preferences will cure 
about 99% of the problems that you'll run 
into with Photoshop (and it's the very first 
thing Adobe's own tech support will tell 
you to fix), so it's totally worth doing. To 
rebuild your preferences, go ahead and 
quit Photoshop, then press-and-hold 
Command-Option-Shift (PC: Ctrl-Alt-Shift) 
and launch Photoshop (keep holding 
them down). A dialog will pop up asking if 
you want to Delete the Adobe Pho- 
toshop Settings File. Click Yes, and 
chances are, your problems will be gone. 

Creating a New Document 
with the Same Specs as 
Another Open Document 

If you have an image already open, and 

you want to create a new blank document 

with the exact same size, resolution, and 

color space, just press Command-N (PC: 



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from the Preset pop-up menu up top, 
choose the name of your already open 
document, and it takes all the specs from 
that document and fills in all the fields for 
you. All you have to do is click OK. 

Retouching Tip for Liquify 

If you're using the Liquify filter to do 
some retouching on a portrait, you can 
make sure you don't accidentally move 
an area you don't want to affect by 
freezing it, and there are freeze tools 
in Liquify, but it's easier to just put a 
selection around the area you want to 
adjust first, then bring up the Liquify 
filter, and any area outside your select 
edarea is automatically frozen. (You'll 
see a rectangle with your selection in it 
in 
the Preview area, and the areas out 



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► 324 



Chapter 9 



Special Effects for Photographers 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



Photoshop Killer Tips 



Super-Fast Temporary 
Tool Switching 

This is one Adobe introduced back in CS4, 
but few people knew it was there. They're 
called Spring Loaded Tools, and what they 
let you do is temporarily access any other 
tool while you're using your current tool. 
When you're done, Photoshop automati- 
cally switches back. Here's how it works: 
Let's say you have the Brush tool, but you 
need to put a Lasso selection around an 
area, so you don't paint outside of it. Just 
press-and-hold the L key (for the Lasso 



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tool), and your Brush tool temporarily 
switches to the Lasso tool. Make your 
selection, then just let go of the L key 
and you're back to the Brush tool. This 
is a huge time and trouble saver. 

Designing for a Cell Phone 
or Tablet? 

Then you'll be happy to know that there 
are a bunch of new built-in presets for 
the most common sizes of mobile de- 
vice screens. From the File menu, choose 
New, then choose Mobile & Devices 
from the Preset pop-up menu, and then 
choose the size you need from the Size 
pop-up menu. 



Assigning More 
RAM to Photoshop 

You can control how much of your com- 
puter's installed RAM actually gets set 
aside just for Photoshop's use. You do 
this within Photoshop itself, by press- 
ing Command-K (PC: Ctrl-K) to bring 
up Photoshop's Preferences, then click 
Performance in the list on the left side 
of the dialog. Now you'll see a bar graph 
with a slider that represents how much 
of your installed RAM is set aside for 
Photoshop. Drag the slider to the right 

Memory Usage — 



Available RAM: 3862 MB 

Ideal Range: 2124-27B0 MB 



Let Photoshop Use: J27Q3 ~| MB (70%) 



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3 + 



to allocate more RAM for Photoshop 
(the changes don't take effect until you 
restart Photoshop). 

Save Time When Saving 

When you click on the Save Image but- 
ton in the bottom left of the Camera Raw 
window, it brings up the Save Options 
dialog, but if you don't need to make 
any changes to your settings, you can 
skip this dialog altogether by pressing- 
and-holding the Option (PC: Alt) key 
before clicking the Save Image button. 
Hey, every click you save, counts. 




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Shortcuts for Changing 
the Order of Layers 

I use these a lot, because it saves a trip 
over to the Layers panel dozens of times 
a day. To move your current layer up 
one layer (in the stack of layers), press 
Command-] (Right Bracket key; PC: Ctrl-]) 
and of course to move down, you'd use 
the same shortcut with the Left Bracket 
key ([). To move the current layer all the 
way to the top, add the Shift key. Of 
course, you can't move anything below 
the locked Background layer. 




Special Effects for Photographers 



Chapter 9 



325 < 




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Photo by Scott Kelby Exposure: 1/25 sec Focal Length: 14 mm Aperture Value: f/63 



Chapter 10 Sharpening Techniques 




Sharpen Your Teeth 

sharpening techniques 



I had two really good song titles to choose from for 
this chapter: "Sharpen Your Teeth" by Ugly Casanova 
or "Sharpen Your Sticks" by The Bags. Is it just me, or at 
this point in time, have they totally run out of cool band 
names? Back when I was a kid (just a few years ago, mind 
you), band names made sense. There were The Beatles, 
and The Turtles, and The Animals, and The Monkees, and 
The Flesh Eating Mutant Zombies, and The Carnivorous 
Flesh Eating Vegetarians, and The Bulimic Fresh Salad Bar 
Restockers, and names that really made sense. But, "The 
Bags?" Unless this is a group whose members are made 
up of elderly women from Yonkers, I think it's totally 
misnamed. You see, when I was a kid, when a band was 
named The Turtles, its members looked and acted like 
turtles. That's what made it great (remember their hit 
single "Peeking Out of My Shell," or who could forget 
"Slowly Crossing a Busy Highway" or my favorite "I Got Hit 



Crossing a Busy Highway"?). But today, you don't have 
to look ugly to be in a band named Ugly Casanova, and 
I think that's just wrong. It's a classic bait-and-switch. 
If I were in a band (and I am), I would name it something 
that reflects the real makeup of the group, and how we act. 
An ideal name for our band would be The Devastatingly 
Handsome Super Hunky Guys With Six-Pack Abs (though 
our fans would probably just call us TDHSHGWSPA for 
short). I could picture us playing at large 24-hour health 
clubs and Gold's Gyms, and other places where beautiful 
people (like ourselves) gather to high-five one another on 
being beautiful. Then, as we grew in popularity, we'd have 
to hire a manager. Before long he would sit us down and 
tell us that we're living a lie, and that TDHSHGWSPA is 
not really the right name for our band, and he'd propose 
something along the lines of Muscle Bound Studs Who 
Are Loose With Money or more likely, The Bags. 



327 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Sharpening 
Essentials 



After you've tweaked your photo the way you want it, and right before you save it, 
you'll definitely want to sharpen it. I sharpen every photo, either to help bring back 
some of the original crispness that gets lost during the correction process, or to 
help fix a photo that's slightly out of focus. Either way, I haven't met a digital camera 
(or scanned) photo that I didn't think needed a little sharpening. Here's a basic 
technique for sharpening the entire photo: 



Step One: 

Open the photo you want to sharpen. 
Because Photoshop displays your photo 
differently at different magnifications, 
choosing the right magnification (also 
called the zoom amount) for sharpening 
is critical. Because today's digital cameras 
produce such large-sized files, it's now 
pretty much generally accepted that the 
proper magnification to view your pho- 
tos during sharpening is 50%. If you look 
up in your image window's title bar, it 
displays the current percentage of zoom 
(shown circled here in red). The quickest 
way to get to a 50% magnification is to 
press Command-+ (plus sign; PC: Ctrl-+) 
or Command— (minus sign; PC: Ctrl—) 
to zoom the magnification in or out. 



Step Two: 

Once you're viewing your photo at 
50% size, go under the Filter menu, 
under Sharpen, and choose Unsharp 
Mask. (If you're familiar with traditional 
darkroom techniques, you probably 
recognize the term "unsharp mask" 
from when you would make a blurred 
copy of the original photo and an 
"unsharp" version to use as a mask 
to create a new photo whose edges 
appeared sharper.) 




elect 



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Convert for Smart Filters 

Filter Gallery... 

Adaptive Wfde Angle... ASA 

Lens Correction... OSR 

Liquify... OffiX 

Oil Paint... 

Vanishing Point... tSV 






Blur 
Distort 
Noise 
Pixel ate 
Render 

Stylize 
Video 

Other 




Sharpen 
Sharpen Edges 
Sharpen More 
Smart Sharpen.. 



► 328 Chapter 10 



Sharpening Techniques 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



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When the Unsharp Mask dialog 
appears, you'll see three sliders. The 
Amount slider determines the amount 
of sharpening applied to the photo; 
the Radius slider determines how many 
pixels out from the edge the sharpen- 
ing will affect; and Threshold determines 
how different a pixel must be from the 
surrounding area before it's considered 
an edge pixel and sharpened by the 
filter (by the way, the Threshold slider 
works the opposite of what you might 
think — the lower the number, the more 
intense the sharpening effect). So what 
numbers do you enter? I'll give you some 
great starting points on the following 
pages, but for now, we'll just use these 
settings — Amount: 120%, Radius: 1, and 
Threshold: 3. Click OK and the sharpen- 
ing is applied to the entire photo (see 
the After photo below). 




Before 



After 



(Continued) 



Sharpening Techniques Chapter 10 329< 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Soft subject sharpening: 

Here are Unsharp Mask settings — 
Amount: 120%, Radius: 1, Threshold: 
10 — that work well for images where the 
subject is of a softer nature (e.g., flow- 
ers, puppies, people, rainbows, etc.). It's 
a subtle application of sharpening that is 
very well suited to these types of subjects. 



Portrait sharpening: 

If you're sharpening close-up portraits, try 
these settings — Amount: 75%, Radius: 2, 
Threshold: 3 — which apply another form of 
subtle sharpening, but with enough punch 
to make eyes sparkle a little bit, and bring 
out highlights in your subject's hair. 

TIP: Sharpening Women 

If you need to apply a higher level of 
sharpening to a portrait of a woman, 
first go to the Channels panel and click 
on the Red channel (shown here) to make 
it the active channel (your image will ap- 
pear in black and white). Now, apply your 
sharpening here, using a higher Amount, 
like 120%, Radius: 1, Threshold: 3, right to 
this Red channel. By doing this, it avoids 
sharpening most of the skin texture and 
instead just sharpens her eyes, eyebrows, 
lips, hair, and so on. Once it's applied, 
click on the RGB channel at the top of 
the Channels panel to return to the full- 
color image. 




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► 330 



Chapter 10 



Sharpening Techniques 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 




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Moderate sharpening: 

This is a moderate amount of sharpen- 
ing that works nicely on everything from 
product shots, to photos of home interi- 
ors and exteriors, to landscapes (and 
in this case, some clay pots). These are 
my favorite settings when you need 
some nice snappy sharpening. Try ap- 
plying these settings — Amount: 120%, 
Radius: 1, Threshold: 3 — and see how 
you like it (my guess is you will). Take a 
look at how it added snap and detail to 
the rings around the pots and the slits 
in the tops. 



Maximum sharpening: 

I use these settings — Amount: 65%, 
Radius: 4, Threshold: 3 — in only two 
situations: (1) The photo is visibly out 
of focus and it needs a heavy applica- 
tion of sharpening to try to bring it 
back into focus. (2) The photo contains 
lots of well-defined edges (e.g., rocks, 
buildings, coins, cars, machinery, etc.). 
In this photo, the heavy amount of 
sharpening really brings out the detail 
in this cockpit control panel. 



(Continued) 



Sharpening Techniques Chapter 10 331 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



All-purpose sharpening: 

These are probably my all-around favor- 
ite sharpening settings — Amount: 85%, 
Radius: 1, Threshold: 4 — and I use these 
most of the time. It's not a "knock-you- 
over-the-head" type of sharpening — 
maybe that's why I like it. It's subtle 
enough that you can apply it twice if 
your photo doesn't seem sharp enough 
the first time you run it, but once will 
usually do the trick. 



Web sharpening: 

I use these settings — Amount: 200%, 
Radius: 0.3, Threshold: — for web 
graphics that look blurry. (When you 
drop the resolution from a high-res, 
300-ppi photo down to 72 ppi for the 
web, the photo often gets a bit blurry 
and soft.) If the sharpening doesn't 
seem sharp enough, try increasing the 
Amount to 400%. I also use this same 
setting (Amount: 400%) on out-of-focus 
photos. It adds some noise, but I've 
seen it rescue photos that I would 
otherwise have thrown away. 




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► 332 



Chapter 10 



Sharpening Techniques 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



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1 Pixels 


'-' 


Threshold: 1 2 


levels 







O % Create Your Own jpg @ 50% (RCB/8) 












Radius 


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1 


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* 








Threshold 


' 


1 


levels 











Coming up with your own settings: 

If you want to experiment and come up 
with your own custom blend of sharpen- 
ing, I'll give you some typical ranges for 
each adjustment so you can find your 
own sharpening "sweet spot." 

Amount 

Typical ranges run anywhere from 50% 
to 150%. This isn't a hard-and-fast rule — 
just a typical range for adjusting the 
Amount, where going below 50% won't 
have enough effect, and going above 
150% might get you into sharpening 
trouble (depending on how you set the 
Radius and Threshold). You're fairly safe 
staying under 150%. (In the example 
here, I reset my Radius and Threshold 
to 1 and 2, respectively.) 



Radius 

Most of the time, you'll use just 1 pixel, 
but you can go as high as (get ready) 
2 pixels. You saw one setting I gave you 
earlier for extreme situations, where you 
can take the Radius as high as 4 pixels. 
I once heard a tale of a man in Cincinnati 
who used 5, but I'm not sure I believe it. 
(Incidentally, Adobe allows you to raise 
the Radius amount to [get this] 250! If you 
ask me, anyone caught using 250 as their 
Radius setting should be incarcerated for 
a period not to exceed one year and a 
penalty not to exceed $2,500.) 



(Continued) 



Sharpening Techniques Chapter 10 333 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Threshold 

A pretty safe range for the Threshold 
setting is anywhere from 3 to around 
20 (3 being the most intense, 20 being 
much more subtle. I know, shouldn't 3 
be more subtle and 20 be more intense? 
Don't get me started). If you really need 
to increase the intensity of your sharpen- 
ing, you can lower the Threshold to 0, but 
keep a good eye on what you're doing 
(watch for noise appearing in your photo). 



The Final Image 

For the final sharpened image you see 
here, I used the Moderate sharpening 
settings I gave earlier (Amount: 120%, 
Radius: 1, Threshold: 3), and I used that 
tip I gave you after the Portrait sharpen- 
ing settings for sharpening women, where 
I only applied this sharpening to the Red 
channel, so it avoided sharpening her 
skin texture too much (yet sharpened 
her hair, eyebrows, lips, clothing, etc.). If 
you're uncomfortable with creating your 
own custom Unsharp Mask settings, then 
start with this: pick a starting point (one 
of the set of settings I gave on the pre- 
vious pages), and then just move the 
Amount slider and nothing else (so, don't 
touch the Radius and Threshold sliders). 
Try that for a while, and it won't be long 
before you'll find a situation where you 
ask yourself, "I wonder if lowering the 
Threshold would help?" and by then, 
you'll be perfectly comfortable with it. 



^ ". Create Your Own jpg @ 50% (RGB/8) 




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Before 



After 



► 334 



Chapter 10 



Sharpening Techniques 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



This sharpening technique is my most often-used technique, and it has replaced the 

Lab Sharpening technique I've used in the past, because it's quicker and easier, and 

pretty much accomplishes the same thing, which is helping to avoid the color halos 

and color artifacts (spots and noise) that appear when you add a lot of sharpening 

to a photo. Because it helps avoid those halos and other color problems, it 

allows you to apply more sharpening than you normally could get away with. 



Luminosity 
Sharpening 




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Step One: 

Open the RGB photo you want to sharpen, 
and apply an Unsharp Mask just like you 
normally would (for this particular photo, 
let's apply these settings — Amount: 120, 
Radius: 1, Threshold: 3, which is my recipe 
for nice, punchy sharpening). 



Step Two: 

Immediately after you've applied the 
sharpening, go under the Edit menu 
and choose Fade Unsharp Mask (as 

shown below). 

TIP: Undo on a Slider 

I think of Fade's Opacity slider (seen 
here) as "Undo on a slider," because if 
you drag it down to 0, it undoes your 
sharpening. If you leave it at 100%, it's 
the full sharpening. If you lower the 
Opacity to 50%, you get half the sharp- 
ening applied, and so on. So, if I apply 
sharpening and I think it's too much, 
rather than changing all the settings 
and trying again, I'll just use the Fade 
Opacity slider to lower the amount a 
bit. I'll also use Fade when I've applied 
some sharpening and it's not enough. 
I just apply the Unsharp Mask filter 
again, then lower the Opacity to 50%. 
That way, I get 1 1 /2 sharpenings. 

(Continued) 



Sharpening Techniques Chapter 10 335 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Three: 

So, at this point, you can ignore the 
Opacity slider altogether, because the 
only thing you're going to do here is 
change the Fade dialog's Mode pop- 
up menu from Normal to Luminosity 
(as shown here). Now your sharpening 
is applied to just the luminosity (detail) 
areas of your photo, and not the color 
areas, and by doing this it helps avoid 
color halos and other pitfalls of sharp- 
ening a color image. 



Step Four: 

Click the OK button, and now your sharp- 
ening is applied to just the luminosity of 
the image (which is very much like the 
old Lab mode sharpening we used to 
do, where you convert your image to Lab 
Color mode, then just sharpen the Light- 
ness channel, and then convert back to 
RGB Color mode). So, should you apply 
this brand of sharpening to every digital 
camera photo you take? I would. In fact, 
I do, and since I perform this function 
quite often, I automated the process 
(as you'll see in the next step). 



Luminosity Sharpening 1 jpg @ SOK (RGB/S) * 



Opacity: 




Fade 



Mode / Normal 

Dissolve 

Darken 
Multiply 
Color Burn 
Linear Burn 



Darker Color 

Lighten 
Screen 
Color Dodge 
Linear Dodge {Add) 
Lighter Color 

Overlay 
Soft Light 
Hard Light 
Vivid Light 
Linear Light 
Pin Light 
Hard Mix 

Difference 
Exclusion 
Subtract 
Divide 



Hue 
Saturation 

Color 



Luminosity Sharpening ljpg @ 50% (RCB/S) '' 




► 336 



Chapter 10 



Sharpening Techniques 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



: 



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Step Five: 

Open a different RGB photo, and let's 
do the whole Luminosity sharpening 
thing again, but this time, before you 
start the process, go under the Window 
menu and choose Actions to bring up 
the Actions panel (seen here). The 
Actions panel is a "steps recorder" 
that records any set of repetitive steps 
and lets you instantly play them back 
(apply them to another photo) by simply 
pressing one button (you'll totally dig 
this). In the Actions panel, click on the 
Create New Action icon at the bottom 
of the panel (it looks just like the Create 
a New Layer icon from the Layers panel, 
and it's shown circled in red here). 



Step Six: 

Clicking that icon brings up the New 
Action dialog (shown here). The Name 
field is automatically highlighted, so go 
ahead and give this new action a name. 
(I named mine "Luminosity Sharpen." 
I know — how original!) Then, from the 
Function Key pop-up menu, choose the 
number of the Function key (F-key) on 
your keyboard that you want to assign 
to the action (this is the key you'll hit 
to make the action do its thing). I've as- 
signed mine F11, but you can choose 
any open F-key that suits you (but every- 
body knows F11 is, in fact, the coolest 
of all F-keys — just ask anyone. On a Mac, 
you may need to turn off the OS key- 
board shortcut for F11 first). You'll notice 
that the New Actions dialog has no OK 
button. Instead, there's a Record but- 
ton, because once you exit this dialog, 
Photoshop starts recording your steps. 
So go ahead and click Record. 

(Continued) 



Sharpening Techniques 



Chapter 10 



337 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Seven: 

With Photoshop recording every move 
you make, do the Luminosity sharpening 
technique you learned on the previous 
pages (apply your favorite Unsharp Mask 
setting, then go under the Edit menu, 
choose Fade Unsharp Mask, and when 
the dialog appears, change the blend 
mode to Luminosity and click OK. Also, 
if you generally like a second helping of 
sharpening, you can run the filter again, 
but don't forget to Fade to Luminosity 
right after you're done). Now, in the 
Actions panel, click on the Stop icon at 
the bottom of the panel (it's the square 
icon on the left, shown circled here 
in red). 



Step Eight: 

This stops the recording process. If you 
look in the Actions panel, you'll see all 
your steps recorded in the order you did 
them. Also, if you expand the right-facing 
triangle beside each step (as shown here), 
you'll see more detail, including indivi- 
dual settings, for the steps it recorded. 
You can see here that I used the Amount: 
120%, Radius: 1, and Threshold: 3 Un- 
sharp Mask settings. 





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► 338 



Chapter 10 



Sharpening Techniques 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



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Step Nine: 

Now, open a different RGB photo and 
let's test your action to see that it works 
(it's important to test it now before mov- 
ing on to the next step). Press the F-key 
you assigned to your action (you chose 
F11, right? I knew it!) or click on the Play 
Selection icon at the bottom of the 
Actions panel. Photoshop immediately 
applies the sharpening to the Luminosity 
for you, and does it all faster than you 
could ever do it manually, because it 
takes place behind the scenes with 
no dialogs popping up. 



Step 10: 

Now that you've tested your action, 
we're going to put that baby to work. 
Of course, you could open more photos 
and then press F11 to have your action 
Luminosity sharpen them one at a time, 
but there's a better way. Once you've 
written an action, you can apply that 
action to an entire folder full of photos 
and Photoshop will totally automate 
the whole process for you (it will liter- 
ally open every photo in the folder and 
apply your Luminosity sharpening, and 
then save and close every photo — all 
automatically. How cool is that?). This is 
called batch processing, and here's how 
it works: Go under the File menu, under 
Automate, and choose Batch to bring 
up the Batch dialog (or you can select all 
the images within a folder in Mini Bridge, 
then Right-click on any one of those 
thumbnails, and then under Photoshop, 
choose Batch). At the top of the dialog, 
within the Play section, choose your 
Luminosity Sharpen action from the 
Action pop-up menu (if it's not already 
selected, as shown here). 

(Continued) 



Sharpening Techniques 



Chapter 10 



339 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step 11: 

In the Source section of the Batch dia- 
log, you tell Photoshop which folder of 
photos you want to Luminosity sharpen. 
So, choose Folder from the Source pop- 
up menu (you can also choose Bridge to 
run this batch action on selected photos 
from Mini Bridge or Big Bridge, or you 
can import photos from another source, 
or choose to run it on images that are 
already open in Photoshop). Then, click 
on the Choose button. A standard Open 
dialog will appear (shown here), so you 
can navigate to your folder of photos 
you want to sharpen. Once you find that 
folder, click on it (as shown), then click 
the Choose (PC: OK) button. 



Step 12: 

In the Destination section of the Batch 
dialog, you tell Photoshop where you 
want to put these photos once the action 
has done its thing. If you choose Save and 
Close from the Destination pop-up menu 
(as shown here), Photoshop will save the 
images in the same folder they're in. If 
you select Folder from the Destination 
pop-up menu, Photoshop will place your 
Luminosity-sharpened photos into a to- 
tally different folder. To do this, click on 
the Choose button in the Destination 
section, navigate to your target folder 
(or create a new one), and click Choose 
(PC: OK). 



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► 340 Chapter 10 



Sharpening Techniques 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



: 



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Step 13: 

If you do choose to move them to a 
new folder, you can automatically re- 
name your photos in the process. In short, 
here's how the file naming works: In the 
first field within the File Naming section, 
you type the basic name you want all the 
files to have. In the other fields, you can 
choose (from a pop-up menu) the auto- 
matic numbering scheme to use (adding 
a 1-digit number, 2-digit number, etc., 
and if you choose this, there's a field near 
the bottom where you can choose which 
number to start with). You can also choose 
to add the appropriate file extension (JPG, 
TIFF, etc.) in upper- or lowercase to the 
end of the new name. At the bottom of 
the dialog, there's a row of checkboxes 
for choosing compatibility with other op- 
erating systems. I generally turn all of 
these on, because ya never know. When 
you're finally done in the Batch dialog, 
click OK and Photoshop will automatically 
Luminosity sharpen, rename, and save all 
your photos in a new folder for you. Nice! 



Sharpening Techniques 



Chapter 10 



341 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



The Most 

Advanced 

Sharpening in 

Photoshop 



Back in Photoshop CS5, Adobe rewrote the underlying logic of the Sharpen tool — 
taking it from its previous role as a "noise generator/pixel destroyer" to what 
Adobe Product Manager Bryan O'Neil Hughes has called "...the most advanced 
sharpening in any of our products." Here's how it works: 



Step One: 

Start by applying your regular sharpening 
to the overall image using Unsharp Mask 
or Smart Sharpen (more on this coming 
up next) — your choice. In this case, since 
this is a portrait of a woman, I'd apply this 
overall sharpening to just the Red channel 
(see the tip on page 330 in this chapter). 
Now, get the Sharpen tool from the Tool- 
box (it's found nested beneath the Blur 
tool, as seen here). Once you've got the 
tool, go up to the Options Bar and make 
sure the Protect Detail checkbox (shown 
circled here in red) is turned on (this is the 
checkbox that makes all the difference, 
as it turns on the advanced sharpening 
algorithm for this tool). 



Step Two: 

I recommend duplicating the Back- 
ground layer at this point (by pressing 
Command-J [PC: Ctrl-J]) and applying 
this extra level of sharpening to this du- 
plicate layer. That way, if you think the 
sharpening looks too intense, you can 
just lower the amount of it by lowering 
the opacity of this layer. I also usually 
zoom in (by pressing Command-+ [plus 
sign; PC: Ctrl-+]) on a detail area (like 
her eyes), so I can really see the effects 
of the sharpening clearly (another ben- 
efit of applying the sharpening to a 
duplicate layer is that you can quickly 
see a before/after of all the sharpening 
by showing/hiding the layer). 



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► 342 



Chapter 10 



Sharpening Techniques 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



: 



©no 



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Step Three: 

Now, choose a medium-sized, soft- 
edged brush from the Brush Picker in 
the Options Bar, and then simply take 
the Sharpen tool and paint over just the 
areas you want to appear sharp (this is 
really handy for portraits like this, be- 
cause you can avoid areas you want to 
remain soft, like skin, but then super- 
sharpen areas you want to be really nice 
and crisp, like her irises and the buttons 
on her jacket, like I'm doing here). Below 
is a before/after, after painting over other 
areas that you'd normally sharpen, like her 
eyes, eyebrows, eyelashes, and lips, while 
avoiding all areas of flesh tone. One more 
thing: This technique is definitely not just 
for portraits. The Sharpen tool does a 
great job on anything metal or chrome, 
and it's wonderful on jewelry, or anything 
that needs that extra level of sharpening. 




Before 



After 



Sharpening Techniques Chapter 10 343 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



When to Use the 

Smart Sharpen 

Filter Instead 



Although it hasn't caught on like many of us hoped, the Smart Sharpen filter 
offers some of the most advanced sharpening available in Photoshop CS6 
(along with the improved Sharpen tool), because within it is a special sharpening 
algorithm that's better than the one found in the ever popular Unsharp Mask filter — 
you just have to know where to turn it on. Because Unsharp Mask is still so popular 
(old habits are hard to break), I find that I generally switch to Smart Sharpen when 
I run into a photo that's just a little soft (maybe I moved a bit when taking 
the shot, so it's not really sharp right out of the camera). 



Step One: 

Go under the Filter menu, under Sharpen, 
and choose Smart Sharpen. This filter 
is in Basic mode by default, so there are 
only two sliders: Amount controls the 
amount of sharpening (I know, "duh!") 
and Radius determines how many pixels 
the sharpening will affect. The default 
Amount setting of 100% seems too high 
to me for everyday use, so I usually find 
myself lowering it to between 60% and 
70%. The Radius is set at 1 by default, 
and I rarely change that, but for this 
image, I raised it to 2. 



Step Two: 

Below the Radius slider is the Remove 
pop-up menu (shown here), which lists 
the three types of blurs you can reduce. 
Gaussian Blur (the default) applies the 
same sharpening you get using the regu- 
lar Unsharp Mask filter. Motion Blur is 
useless, unless you can accurately de- 
termine the angle of blur in your image 
(which I've yet to be able to do even once). 
The third one is the one I recommend: 
Lens Blur. This uses a sharpening algo- 
rithm created by Adobe's engineers that's 
better at detecting edges, so it creates 
fewer color halos than you'd get with the 
other choices, and overall I think it gives 
you better sharpening for most images. 




( OK 


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Q Cancel 


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► 344 



Chapter 10 



Sharpening Techniques 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



Smart Sharpen 




( OK 


^ 


£ Cancel j 

Preview 

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(_ Cancel J 



Step Three: 

The only downside to choosing Lens 
Blur is that it makes the filter take a little 
longer to "do its thing." (That's why it's 
not the default choice, even though it 
provides better-quality sharpening.) 
After you choose Lens Blur, go to the 
bottom of the dialog and you'll see a 
checkbox for More Accurate. It gives 
you (according to Adobe) more accurate 
sharpening by applying multiple iterations 
of the sharpening. I leave More Accurate 
turned on all the time. (After all, who 
wants "less accurate" sharpening?) Note: 
If you're working on a large file, the More 
Accurate option can cause the filter to 
process slower, so it's up to you if it's 
worth the wait (I think it is). By the way, 
the use of the More Accurate checkbox is 
one of those topics that Photoshop users 
debate back and forth in online forums. 
For regular everyday sharpening it might 
be overkill, but again, the reason I use 
Smart Sharpen is because the photo is 
visibly blurry, slightly out of focus, or 
needs major sharpening to save. So 
I leave this on all the time. 



Step Four: 

If you find yourself applying a setting 
such as this over and over again, you 
can save these settings and add them 
to the Settings pop-up menu at the top 
of the dialog by clicking on the icon to the 
right of the pop-up menu. This brings up 
a dialog for you to name your saved set- 
tings, and then click OK. Now, the next 
time you're in the Smart Sharpen filter 
dialog and you want to instantly call up 
your saved settings, just choose it from 
the Settings pop-up menu. 

(Continued) 



Sharpening Techniques 



Chapter 10 



345 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

If you click the Advanced radio button, 
it reveals two additional tabs with con- 
trols for reducing the sharpening in just 
the shadow or just the highlight areas 
that are applied to the settings you chose 
back in the Basic section. That's why in 
the Shadow and Highlight tabs, the top 
slider says "Fade Amount" rather than 
just "Amount." As you drag the Fade 
Amount slider to the right, you're reduc- 
ing the amount of sharpening already 
applied, which can help reduce any halos 
in the highlights. (Note: Without increas- 
ing the amount of fade, you can't tweak 
the Tonal Width and Radius amounts. 
They only kick in when you increase the 
Fade Amount.) Thankfully, I rarely have 
had to use these Advanced controls, 
so 99% of my work in Smart Sharpen is 
done using the Basic controls. 



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Before 



After 



► 346 



Chapter 10 



Sharpening Techniques 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



I don't normally include the same technique twice in the same book, but if you 

read the HDR chapter, I included High Pass sharpening there, too, because it 

has become kind of synonymous with HDR processing. Of course, what I'm 

concerned about is that you skipped over the HDR chapter altogether, and came 

here to the sharpening chapter, and you'd be wondering why the very popular 

High Pass sharpening technique (which creates extreme sharpening) wasn't 

included in the book. Well, it's so good, it is covered twice. :) 



High Pass 
Sharpening 



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Step One: 

Open a photo that needs some 
extreme sharpening, like this photo 
taken in India. Duplicate the Back- 
ground layer, as shown here, by press- 
ing Command-J (PC: Ctrl-J). 



Step Two: 

Go under the Filter menu, under Other, 
and choose High Pass. You use this filter 
to accentuate the edges in the photo, and 
making those edges stand out can really 
give the impression of mega-sharpening. 
I start by dragging the Radius slider all 
the way to the left (everything turns gray 
onscreen), then I drag it over to the right. 
For non-HDR images, I don't drag it all 
that far — I just drag until I see the edges 
of objects in the photos appear clearly, 
and then I stop. The farther you drag, 
the more intense the sharpening will be, 
but if you drag too far, you start to get 
these huge glows and the effect starts 
to fall apart, so don't get carried away. 
Now, click OK to apply the sharpening. 

(Continued) 



Sharpening Techniques 



Chapter 10 



347 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Three: 

In the Layers panel, change the layer 
blend mode of this layer from Normal to 
Hard Light. This removes the gray color 
from the layer, but leaves the edges 
accentuated, making the entire photo 
appear much sharper (as seen here). If 
the sharpening seems too intense, you 
can control the amount of the effect by 
lowering the layer's Opacity in the Layers 
panel, or try changing the blend mode 
to Overlay (which makes the sharpening 
less intense) or Soft Light (even more so). 

Step Four: 

If you want even more sharpening, dupli- 
cate the High Pass layer to double-up 
the sharpening. If that's too much, lower 
the Opacity of the top layer. One prob- 
lem with High Pass sharpening is that you 
might get a glow along some edges. The 
trick to getting rid of that is to: (1) press 
Command-E (PC: Ctrl-E) to merge the 
two High Pass layers, (2) click the Add 
Layer Mask button at the bottom of the 
panel, (3) get the Brush tool (B), and 
with a small, soft-edged brush and your 
Foreground color set to black, (4) paint 
right along the edge, revealing the origi- 
nal, unsharpened edge with no glow. 




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After 



► 348 Chapter 10 Sharpening Techniques 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



If you wind up doing all your edits from right within Camera Raw, 

and then you save straight to a JPEG or TIFF right from Camera Raw, as well 

(skipping the jump to Photoshop altogether), you'll still want to sharpen your 

image for how the image will be viewed (onscreen, in print, etc.). This is called 

"output sharpening" (the sharpening you do in Camera Raw's Detail panel is 

called "input sharpening," because it's designed to replace the sharpening that 

would have been done in your camera if you had shot in JPEG or TIFF mode). 



Output Sharpening 
in Camera Raw 




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Step One: 

Before we do this output sharpening, it's 
important to note that this sharpening 
only kicks in if you're going to save your 
image from right here within Camera Raw 
by clicking the Save Image button in the 
bottom-left corner of the Camera Raw 
window. If you click the Open Image or 
Done button, the output sharpening is 
not applied. Okay, now that you know, 
you find output sharpening by clicking 
on the line of text (which looks like a 
web link) below the Preview area (it's 
circled here in red). 



Step Two: 

First, choose how you want this image 
sharpened from the Sharpen For pop- 
up menu near the bottom: Screen is for 
images you're going to post on the web, 
email to a client, or present in a slide show. 
If the image is going to be printed, choose 
whether you'll be printing to Glossy Paper 
or Matte Paper. Lastly, choose the amount 
of sharpening you want from the Amount 
pop-up menu. Camera Raw will do the 
math based on the image's resolution, 
your Sharpen For choice, and Amount 
choice (I never choose Low, by the way) 
to calculate the exact right amount of 
output sharpening. Note: When you click 
OK, the sharpening stays on from now 
on. To turn it off, choose None from the 
Sharpen For pop-up menu. 



Sharpening Techniques 



Chapter 10 



349 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Photoshop Killer Tips 



Content-Aware Fill Tips 



Expand Selection 



Expand By: U pixels 



( Cancel ) 



If you made a selection in an image and 
tried Content-Aware Fill on it, but you're 
not happy with the results, try one of 
these two tips: (1) Press Command-Z (PC: 
Ctrl-Z) to Undo the Fill, then try Content- 
Aware Fill again. It's somewhat random in 
choosing the area it samples to fill its area 
from, so simply trying it again might do 
the trick (this works more often than you 
might think). (2) Try to expand your selec- 
tion a little bit. Once you've put a selection 
around what you want to remove, then go 
under the Select menu, under Modify, and 
choose Expand, and try expanding your 
selection by 3 or 4 pixels, and try Content- 
Aware Fill again. It just might do the trick. 

If One of Your Tools 
Starts Acting Weird- 




Reset All Tools 



...chances are something has changed in 
the options for that tool (up in the Options 
Bar) that may not be obvious by just look- 
ing at the Options Bar. In that case, you 
can reset the tool to its factory defaults by 
Right-clicking directly on the little down- 
facing arrow next to the tool's icon at the 
far-left side of the Options Bar, and a pop- 
up menu will appear where you can choose 
to reset your current tool, or all your tools. 



Tip for When You're Zoomed 
In Tight 

If you're zoomed in tight on a photo, there 
is nothing more frustrating than trying to 
move to a different part of the image using 
^ ^ Moderate 5harpening.jpg @ 3... 




the scroll bars (they always seem to move 
you way too far, and then eventually you 
just have to zoom back out and then zoom 
back in again). Instead, just press-and-hold 
the Spacebar, and it temporarily switches 
you to the Hand tool, so you can click-and- 
drag the image right where you want it. 
When you release the Spacebar, it returns 
you to the tool you were using. 

Merge to HDR Pro Can Make 
Killer B&W Images 

I know that when you say "HDR" most 

folks picture those surreal, super-vibrant 

images that you see all over the web, 

which is why you may not think of Merge 

to HDR Pro as a choice for creating 

black-and-white images, but it actually 

does a pretty amazing job (and although 

most of the built-in presets that come 




Preset 

G 

— Mo 

!r 



Monochromatic Low Contrast 
Monochromatic 
More Saturated 
Photorealistic High Contrast 
... 



with Merge to HDR Pro kinda stink, the 
Monochromatic (B&W) presets aren't 
half bad. Give this a try the next time 
you shoot a bracketed image. 

Giving Your RAW Image to Some- 
one Else (Along with Your Edits) 



*^Q 



[ J Cologne 



Cologne-65-2.nef Cologne-55-2.:xrrip j 




Format] 

J PEC 
TIFF 

Photoshop 
JPEG Preview: ' Medium Size 



LJ Embed Fast Load Data 



If you've edited a photo in Camera Raw, 
and you give the RAW file to a client, they 
won't see the edits you've made to the file, 
unless: (a) you include the separate XMP 
file along with your RAW file (it should be 
found right beside the RAW file in your 
image folder), or (2) you save the file in 
DNG format in the Format pop-up menu 
in Camera Raw's Save Options dialog 
(DNG is Adobe's open-source format 
for RAW images, and it embeds your 
edits in the DNG file). 



► 350 



Chapter 10 



Sharpening Techniques 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



Photoshop Killer Tips 



Lock Multiple Layers at Once 

In CS6, if you want to lock more than 
one layer at a time, it's no sweat. Just 
Command-click (PC: Ctrl-click) to select 








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as many layers as you want locked, and 
then click on the Lock icon at the top of 
the Layers panel. This works the same 
when assigning Color labels — just select 
the layers you want to label, then Right- 
click on one of the layers, and choose 
the Color label you want to assign to the 
selected layers from the pop-up menu. 

Making Selections Near the 
Edge of Your Document 

When you're making a selection (with 
the Polygonal Lasso or regular Lasso tool), 
and you reach the edge of your docu- 
ment window, you don't have to release 



and start over — just press-and-hold the 
Spacebar, and your Lasso tool temporar- 
ily switches to the Hand tool, so you can 
move over enough to complete your 



O "^ New High Pass.jpg @ 16.7% (RGB/S) 


*J ^M 






I 


ir^l 



selection, then release the Spacebar and 
it switches you back to the Lasso tool, and 
(here's what's so cool) your selection-in- 
process has been frozen in place, so now 
you can pick right up where you were. 

Keeping Your Camera Settings 
to Yourself 

If you're posting an image on the web, or 

sending an image to a client, you might 

not want to have all your camera settings, 

and camera serial number, included in the 

image where anyone can view it (after all, 

does your client really need to know you 

shot this at f/5.6 at 800 ISO?). So, to keep 

your camera settings to yourself, just press 




Command-A (PC: Ctrl-A) to select your 
entire image, then press Command-C 
(PC: Ctrl-C) to copy it into memory. Now, 
press Command-N (PC: Ctrl-N) and 

Photoshop will automatically create a new 
document that is the exact size, resolution, 
and color mode as the image you copied 
vinto memory. Next, press Command-V 
(PC: Ctrl-V) to paste your image into this 
new blank document. Then, press Com- 
mand-E (PC: Ctrl-E) to flatten the image, 
and you can send this file anywhere with- 
out having your camera data in the file. 
However, I would go under the File menu 
and choose File Info, then click on the 
Description tab, and I'd enter my copy- 
right info in the Copyright section. 

Want to See Your Adjustment Layer 
Controls Larger? 

If you add a Levels, or Hue/Saturation, 
or Curves (and so on) adjustment layer, 
those controls appear in the new Proper- 
ties panel at its default size. But, if you 
want more precision when working with 
those settings in the panel, just click on 
the left side of the panel and drag it out 
to the left. As the panel gets larger, so 
do the adjustment's controls themselves. 




Sharpening Techniques 



Chapter 10 



351 4 




. 




Photo by Scott Kelby Exposure: 1/4000 sec | Focal Length: 14 mm | Aperture Value: //2.8 



Chapter 11 Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management 











IS 




Fine Print 

step-by-step printing and color management 



There is nothing like a photographic print. It's the moment 
when your digitally captured image, edited on a computer, 
moves from a bunch of 1s and Os (computer code) into 
something real you can hold in your hand. If you've never 
made a print (and sadly, in this digital age, I meet people 
every day who have never made a single print — everything 
just stays on their computer, or on Facebook, or someplace 
else where you can "look, but don't touch"), today, all that 
changes, because you're going to learn step by step how 
to make your own prints. Now, if you don't already own a 
printer, this chapter becomes something else. Expensive. 
Actually, in all fairness, it's not the printer — it's the paper and 
ink, which is precisely why the printers aren't too expensive. 
But once you've bought a printer — they've got you. You'll be 
buying paper and ink for the rest of your natural life, and it 
seems like you go through ink cartridges faster than a gallon 



of milk. This is precisely why I've come up with a workflow 
that literally pays for itself — I use my color inkjet printer to 
print out counterfeit U.S. bills. Now, I'm not stupid about it — 
I did some research and found that new ink cartridges for my 
particular printer run about $13.92 each, so I just make $15 
bills (so it also covers the sales tax). Now — again, not stupid 
here — I don't go around using these $15 bills to buy grocer- 
ies or lunch at Chili's, I only use them for ink cartridges, and 
so far, it's worked pretty well. I must admit, I had a couple of 
close calls, though, mainly because I put Dave Cross's face 
on all the bills, which seemed like a good idea at the time, 
until a sales clerk looked closely at the bill and said, "Isn't 
Dave Canadian?" (By the way, this chapter title comes from 
the song "Fine Print" by Nadia Ali. According to her website, 
she was born in the Mediterranean, which is precisely why 
you don't see her on my newly minted $18.60 bills.) 



353 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Setting Up 

Your Camera's 

Color Space 



Although there are entire books written on the subject of color management, in 
this chapter we're going to focus on just one thing — getting what comes out of 
your color inkjet printer to match what you see onscreen. That's what it's all about, 
and if you follow the steps in this chapter, you'll get prints that match your screen. 
We're going to start by setting up your camera's color space, so you'll get the best 
results from screen to print. Note: You can skip this if you only shoot in RAW. 



Step One: 

If you shoot in JPEG or TIFF mode (or 
JPEG + Raw), you'll want to set your cam- 
era's color space to match what you're 
going to use in Photoshop for your color 
space (to get consistent color from your 
camera to Photoshop to your printer, 
you'll want everybody speaking the 
same language, right?). I recommend 
you change your camera's color space 
from its default sRGB to Adobe RGB 
(1998), which is a better color space for 
photographers whose final image will 
come from a color inkjet printer. 



Step Two: 

On a Nikon DSLR, you'll usually 
find the Color Space control under the 
Shooting Menu (as shown here at left). 
On most Canon DSLRs, you'll find the 
Color Space control under the Shooting 
2 menu (as shown here on the right). 
Change the space to Adobe RGB. If 
you're not shooting Nikon or Canon, 
it's time to dig up your owner's manual 
(or, ideally, download it in PDF format 
from the manufacturer's website) to find 
out how to make the switch to Adobe 
RGB (1998). Again, if you're shooting in 
RAW, you can skip this altogether. 




< 




► 354 



Chapter 11 



Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



This is one of those topics that tend to make people crazy, and since there is 
no Official Board of Resolution Standards, this is the type of thing that gets ar- 
gued endlessly in online discussion forums. That being said, I take the word of 
my friend and fellow photographer Dan Steinhardt from Epson (the man behind 
the popular Epson Print Academy), who lives this stuff day in and day out (Dan 
and I did an online training class on printing and this was just about the first topic 
we covered, because for so many, this is a real stumbling block). Here's what we do: 



Resolution 
for Printing 



Image Size 



~ Pixel Dimensions: 


34.SM 


Width: 


2832 


I Pixels m -| 
! Pixels \*\ -* 








Height: 


4256 











C^3 

(^ Cancel } 
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- Document Size: 




Width: 


11,0 


Til A 1 


I Inches 




[ Inches 


} 






Height: 


17.733 






Resolution: 


240 




[ Pixels/Inch 


53 







3 Scale Styles 

3 Constrain Proportions 

H Resample Image: 



[ Bicubic Automata 



Image Size 



Pixel Dimensions: 34. SM 


Width: J300S (Pixels 


A | 


Height: j 2000 j Pixels 





( OK ) 
(_ Cancel J 

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- Document Size: - 




Width: 


12.533 


1 Inches 


— 1? 
— wS -1 






Height: 


8.333 


[ Inches 








[ Pixels /Inch 


m 


Resolution: 


240 







Scale Styles 

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H Resample Image: 



Bicubic Automatic 



Ti 



Step One: 

To see what your current photo's resolu- 
tion is, go under the Image menu and 
choose Image Size (or press Command- 
Option! [PC: Ctrl-AIM]). Ideally, for print- 
ing to a color inkjet printer, I like to be at 
240 ppi (pixels per inch), but I often print 
at 200 ppi, and will go as low as 180 ppi 
(but 180 ppi is absolutely the lowest I'll go. 
Anything below that and, depending on 
the image, you'll start to visibly lose print 
quality). So, I guess the good news here 
is: you don't need as much resolution as 
you might think (even for a printing press). 
Here's an image taken with a 12-megpixel 
camera and you can see that at 240 ppi, 
I can print an image that is nearly 12x18". 



Step Two: 

Here's the resolution from a 6-megapixel 
camera. At 240 ppi I can only print an 
8x12.5" image. So, to make it larger, I turn 
off the Resample Image checkbox, type 
in 200 as my new resolution, and then I'd 
have an image size of 10x15" (with no loss 
of quality). If I lower it to 180 ppi (as low 
as I would ever go), then I get the print 
up to a finished size of 11x16.75" (nearly 
that of a 12-megapixel camera), and I 
did it all without losing quality (because 
I turned off the Resample Image check- 
box, but before you do this, you need 
to read about resizing in Chapter 5). 



Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management 



Chapter 11 



355 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Setting Up 
Photoshop's 
Color Space 



Photoshop's default color space is sRGB (some pros refer to it as "stupid RGB"), 
which is fine for photos going on the web, but your printer can print a wider range 
of colors than sRGB (particularly in the blues and greens). So, if you work in sRGB, 
you're essentially leaving out those rich, vivid colors you could be seeing. That's why 
we either change our color space to Adobe RGB (1998) if you're shooting in JPEG or 
TIFF, which is better for printing those images, or ProPhoto RGB if you shoot in RAW 
or work with Photohsop Lightroom. Here's how to set up both: 



Step One: 

Before we do this, I just want to reiterate 
that you only want to make this change 
if your final print will be output to your 
own color inkjet. If you're sending your 
images out to an outside lab for prints, 
you should probably stay in sRGB — both 
in the camera and in Photoshop — as most 
labs are set up to handle sRGB files. Your 
best bet: ask your lab which color space 
they prefer. Okay, now on to Photoshop: 
go under the Edit menu and choose 
Color Settings (as shown here). 



Step Two: 

This brings up the Color Settings dialog. 
By default, it uses a group of settings 
called "North America General Purpose 
2." Now, does anything about the phrase 
"General Purpose" sound like it would be 
a good space for pro photographers? 
Didn't think so. The tip-off is that under 
Working Spaces, the RGB space is set to 
sRGB IEC61966-2.1 (which is the long- 
hand technical name for what we simply 
call sRGB). In short, you don't want to 
use this group of settings. They're for 
goobers — not for you (unless of course, 
you are a goober, which I doubt because 
you bought this book, and they don't sell 
this book to goobers. It's in each book- 
store's contract). 



Define bi^_ Lesei... 
Define Pattern... 
Define Custom Shape.. 



Purge 



Adobe PDF Presets. ,. 

Presets 

Remote Connections... 

Assign Profile... 
Convert to Profile.. 



Keyboard Shortcuts... \(fSK 
Menus... \1>SM 






Color Settings 






ik Unsynchronrzed: Your Creative Suite applications are n 
L~i synchronized far consistent color. 



OK 



3 



- Settings: [ North America General Purpose 2 



3 



— Working Spacts 



RGB: [ sRGB IK6196E-2 



13 



CMYK: [ U.S. Web Coated [SWOP] v2 

Cray: [ Dot Gain 2 OK 

Spat: [ Dot Cain 20* 



3 



— Color Management Policies ■ 



RCB: [ Pres-erve Embedded Profiles hyj 

CMYK: preserve Emoedded Profiles ■ t ) 

Cray: \ preserve Embedded Profiles jj^ 

Profile Mismatches: D **V when Opening Q Ask When Pasting 

Missing Profiles : Q Ask When Opening 



— Description 

North America. General Purpose 2: Ceneral-purpose color settings for screen 
and print in North America. Profile warnings are disabled. 



(^ Cancel ^ ) 
(_ Load... 

(^ Save... ^ ) 

Q More Options ^ 
r^ Preview 



► 356 



Chapter 11 



Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 




Color Settings 



Unsynchionized: Your Creative Suite applications are not 
synchronized for consistent color. 



- Settings: [ North America Prepress 2 



RGB: [ Adobe RGB qp&BJ 



13 



TO ( Cancel ") 
(_ Load... j 



CMVK: [ U.S. Web Coated [SWOP] v2 



I! 



Gray: [ Dot Gam 2 Oft 






Spat: I Dot Cain 2GMS 






— Color Managemen 
RGB: 

CMVK: 

Cray: 

Profile Mismatches: 
Missing Profiles: 


t Policies — 




Pasting 


I Preserve Embedded Profiles lyj 


[ Preserve Embedded Profiles h^j 


Preserve Embedded Profiles *] 
|Vl Ask Whe n Opening 1^1 Ask Wh e n 
@ Ask When Opening 



North America Prepress 2: Preparation of content for common printing 
conditions in North America. CMtK values are preserved. Profile warnings are 
enabled. 



(_ Save... J 

l ^More Options j 
Preview 



Color Settings 



|GX unsynchronized: Your Creative Suite applications are not 
L-i synch ronized for consistent color. 



— Settings: | Custom 



OK 






— Working Spaces 




CMYK: I U.S. Web Coated (SWGf i v2 




— Color Managemen 
RGB: 

CMYK: 

Cray: 

Profile Mismatches: 
Missing Profiles: 


Policies 

[ Preserve Embedded Profiles h4^ 


n Pasting 


Preserve Embedded Profiles hv^ 


[ Preserve Embedded Profiles p4^ 
Ask Wfat n Opening ^ Ask Wh 
@ Ask When Opening 



- Description - 



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( Load... 



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Preview 



Step Three: 

To get a preset group of settings that's 
better for photographers, from the 
Settings pop-up menu, choose North 
America Prepress 2. Don't let it throw 
you that we're using prepress settings 
here — they work great for color inkjet 
printing because it uses the Adobe RGB 
(1998) color space. It also sets up the 
appropriate warning dialogs to help 
you keep your color management plan 
in action when opening photos from 
outside sources or other cameras (more 
on this on the next page). 



Step Four: 

If you're shooting in RAW exclusively, 
or using Lightroom (Adobe's awesome 
application for photographers), then 
you'll want to change your color space 
in Photoshop to ProPhoto RGB to get 
the best prints from your RAW images 
(plus, if you use Lightroom, you'll wind 
up moving images back and forth be- 
tween Lightroom and Photoshop from 
time to time, and since Lightroom's na- 
tive color space is ProPhoto RGB, you'll 
want to keep everything consistent. While 
you might use Lightroom for your JPEG 
or TIFF images, there's really no advan- 
tage to choosing ProPhoto RGB for them). 
You change Photoshop's Color Space to 
PhotoPro RGB in the Color Settings dia- 
log (just choose it from the RGB menu, as 
shown here). That way, when you open 
a RAW photo in Photoshop (or import 
a file from Lightroom), everything stays 
in the same consistent color space and 
if you wind up bringing an image from 
Lightroom over to Photoshop, and end up 
printing it in Photoshop (instead of jump- 
ing back to Lightroom for printing), you'll 
get better results. 

(Continued) 



Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management 



Chapter 11 



357 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

About those warnings that help you keep 
your color management on track: Let's 
say you open a JPEG photo, and your 
camera was set to shoot in Adobe RGB 
(1998), and your Photoshop is set the 
same way. The two color spaces match, 
so no warnings appear. But, if you open 
a JPEG photo you took six months ago, 
it will probably still be in sRGB, which 
doesn't match your Photoshop working 
space. That's a mismatch, so you'd get the 
warning dialog shown here, telling you 
this. Luckily it gives you the choice of how 
to handle it. I recommend converting that 
document's colors to your current working 
space (as shown here). 



Step Six: 

You can have Photoshop do this conver- 
sion automatically anytime it finds a 
mismatch. Just reopen the Color Settings 
dialog, and under Color Management 
Policies, in the RGB pop-up menu, change 
your default setting to Convert to Work- 
ing RGB (as shown here). For Profile Mis- 
matches, turn off the Ask When Opening 
checkbox. Now when you open sRGB 
photos, they will automatically update to 
match your current working space. Nice! 



Step Seven: 

Okay, so what if a friend emails you a 
photo, you open it in Photoshop, and 
the photo doesn't have any color profile 
at all? Well, once that photo is open in 
Photoshop, you can convert that "un- 
tagged" image to Adobe RGB (1998) by 
going under the Edit menu and choosing 
Assign Profile. When the Assign Profile 
dialog appears, click on the Profile radio 
button, ensure Adobe RGB (1998) is se- 
lected in the pop-up menu, then click OK. 



Embedded Profile Mismatch 



A 



The document "DSCOlfilSjPC 11 has an embedded color profile 
that does not match the current RGB working space. 

Embedded: sRGB IEC61966-2.1 
Working: Adobe RGB (1998) 



What would you like to do? — 

w Use the embedded profile (instead of the working space) 
Convert document's colors to the working space 
Discard the embedded profile (don't color manage) 



Q Cancel j (^ 



OK 



Color Managemen 

KB: 


t Policies 






[ Ccnvert to Working RGB 


M 


CMVK: 
Cray: 


[_ Preserve Embedded Profiles ^^j 




\_ Preserve Embedded Profiles k^ 


Profile Mismatches: 
Missing Profiles: 


[_7l Ask When Opening 
§? Ask When Opening 


Ask When 


Pasting 



Assign Profile 



- Assign Profile: 

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► 358 



Chapter 11 



Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



When we apply sharpening, we apply it so it looks good on our computer screen, 
right? But when you actually make a print, a lot of that sharpening that looks fine 
on a 72- or 96- dpi computer screen gets lost on a high-resolution print at 240 ppi. 
Because the sharpening gets reduced when we make a print, we have to sharpen 
so our photo looks a bit too sharp onscreen, but then looks perfect when it prints. 
Here's how I apply sharpening for images I'm going to print: 



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Step One: 

Start by doing a trick my buddy Shelly 
Katz shared with me: duplicate the Back- 
ground layer (by pressing Co mm and -J 
[PC: Ctrl-J]) and do your print sharpening 
on this duplicate layer (that way, you don't 
mess with the already sharpened original 
image on the Background layer). Name 
this new layer "Sharpened for Print," then 
go under the Filter menu, under Sharpen, 
and choose Unsharp Mask. For most 
240 ppi images, I apply these settings: 
Amount 120; Radius 1; Threshold 3. 
Click OK. 



Step Two: 

Next, reapply the Unsharp Mask fil- 
ter with the same settings by pressing 
Command-F (PC: Ctrl-F). Then, at the 
top of the Layers panel, change the layer 
blend mode to Luminosity (so the sharp- 
ening is only applied to the detail of the 
photo, and not the color), then use the 
Opacity slider to control how much sharp- 
ening is applied. Start at 50% and see if it 
looks a little bit oversharpened. If it looks 
like a little bit too much, stop — you want 
it to look a little oversharpened. If you 
think it's way too much, lower the opacity 
to around 35% and re-evaluate. When it 
looks right (a little too sharp), make a test 
print. My guess is that you'll want to raise 
the opacity up a little higher, because it 
won't be as sharp as you thought. 



Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management 



Chapter 11 



359 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Sending Your Images 

to Be Printed at 

a Photo Lab 



Besides printing images on my own color inkjet printer, I also send a decent amount 
of my print work out to a photo lab (I use Mpix as my lab) for a number of reasons- 
like if I want metallic prints, or I want the image mounted, matted, and/or framed 
with glass, or I want a print that's larger than I can print in-house. Here's how to 
prep your images for uploading to be printed at a photo lab: 



Step One: 

First, contact the photo lab where you're 
sending your image, and ask what color 
profile they want you to use. Chances are 
they are going to want you to convert 
your image to sRGB color mode. I know 
this flies in the face of what we do when 
we print our own images, but I know a 
number of big, high-quality photo labs 
(Mpix included) that all request that you 
convert your images to sRGB first, and 
for their workflow, it works. If they don't 
request you convert to sRGB, they may 
have you download a color profile they've 
created for you, and you'll use it the same 
way as you'll assign sRGB in the next step. 



Step Two: 

With your image open in Photoshop, go 
under the Edit menu, choose Convert to 
Profile, and you'll see the image's current 
color profile at the top of the dialog (here, 
my image is a RAW image, and so it's 
set to ProPhoto RGB). Under Destination 
Space, from the Profile pop-up menu, 
choose sRGB IEC61966-2.1. If you down- 
loaded a profile from your lab, you'll 
choose that instead (more on where to 
save downloads on page 367). Click OK, 
and don't be surprised if the image looks 
pretty much the same. In fact, be happy 
if it does, but at least now it's set up to 
get the best results from your photo lab. 




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► 360 



Chapter 11 



Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



If you really want what comes out of your printer to match what you see onscreen, 
then I don't want to have to be the one to tell you this, but. ..you absolutely, 
positively have to calibrate your monitor using a hardware calibrator. The good 
news is that today it's an absolutely simple, totally automated process. The bad 
news is that you have to buy a hardware calibrator. With hardware calibration, 
it's measuring your actual monitor and building an accurate profile for the 
exact monitor you're using, and yes — it makes that big a difference. 



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Step One: 

I use Datacolor's Spyder4ELITE hardware 
color calibrator (around $249 street price), 
because it's simple, affordable, and a lot 
of the pros I know have moved over to it. 
So, I'm going to use it as an example here, 
but it's not necessary to get this same one, 
because they all work fairly similarly. You 
start by installing the software that comes 
with the Spyder4ELITE. Then, plug the 
Spyder4ELITE sensor into your computer's 
USB port and launch the software, which 
brings up the main window (seen here). 
You follow the "wizard," which asks you 
a couple of simple questions (stuff like, 
"Is this the first time you've calibrated your 
monitor using Spyder4ELITE?" Or, maybe, 
"What's the capital of Nebraska?"), and 
then it does the rest. 

Step Two: 

Start by clicking the Next button in the 
bottom right, and the window you see 
here will appear. If you're new to calibrat- 
ing your monitor, I recommend using the 
Step-by-Step Assistant (which is already 
selected by default), so at this point just 
click the Next button again. 



(Continued) 



Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management Chapter 11 361 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Three: 

The next screen asks you which type of 
calibration you want to do. Are you going 
to just update an older calibration you 
did previously with the Spyder4ELITE 
(then you would choose the ReCAL radio 
button), or do you just want to check 
to see how accurate your current calibra- 
tion is (CheckCAL), or are you doing this 
for the first time (which you are, so you'd 
click the FullCAL radio button, as shown 
here)? Then, just click the Next button, 
because you're going to leave all the 
pop-up menus here at their default 
recommended settings. 



Step Four: 

The next screen asks you to put the 
Spyder unit on your monitor, which 
means you drape the sensor over your 
monitor so it sits flat against it and the 
cord hangs over the back. It shows you 
exactly where to place it (the two blue 
arrows you see beside its outline actually 
flash on/off, so you can't possibly miss 
where it goes). The sensor comes with 
a counterweight you can attach to the 
cord, so you can position the sensor ap- 
proximately in the center of your screen 
without it slipping down. Once the sensor 
is in position over your screen, click the 
Next button, sit back, and relax. You'll see 
the software conduct a series of onscreen 
tests, using gray, white, and various color 
swatches, as shown here. 





► 362 



Chapter 11 



Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 





Step Five: 

This testing only goes on for a few 
minutes (at least, that's all it took for my 
laptop), and then it's done. It asks you to 
name your profile (it puts a default name 
in place for you), so enter a name, and 
then click the Save button. Below that is 
a pop-up menu where you can choose 
when you want an automatic reminder 
to "Recalibrate your monitor" to pop up 
on your screen. The default choice is 2 
Weeks (so please don't tell anyone that 
I actually set mine to 1 Month). Make your 
choice and then click the Next button. 



Step Six: 

Now you get to see the usually shock- 
ing before/after. Click on the Switch 
button at the bottom right and you 
can switch back and forth between 
your now fully calibrated monitor and 
your uncalibrated monitor. It's at that 
moment you say, "Ohhhhhh.. .that's 
why my prints never match my screen." 
Well, it's certainly one part of the puz- 
zle, but without this one critical piece 
in place, you don't have a chance with 
the rest, so you did the right thing. 
Click Next one last time, and then 
click the Quit button in the Profile 
Overview screen. 



Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management 



Chapter 11 



363 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



The Other Secret to 

Getting Pro-Quality 

Prints That Match 

Your Screen 



When you buy a color inkjet printer and install the printer driver that comes with it, 
it basically lets Photoshop know what kind of printer is being used, and that's about 
it. But to get pro-quality results, you need a color profile for your printer based on 
the exact type of paper you'll be printing on. Most inkjet paper manufacturers now 
create custom profiles for their papers, and you can usually download them free 
from their websites. Does this really make that big a difference? Ask any pro. 
Here's how to find and install these profiles: 



Step One: 

Your first step is to go to the website of 
the company that makes the paper you're 
going to be printing on and search for 
their downloadable color profiles for your 
printer. I use the term "search" because 
they're usually not in a really obvious 
place. I use two Epson printers — a Stylus 
Photo R2880 and a Stylus Pro 3880— and 
I generally print on Epson paper. When 
I installed the 3880's printer driver, I was 
tickled to find that it also installed custom 
color profiles for all Epson papers (this 
is rare), but my R2880 (like most print- 
ers) doesn't. So, the first stop would be 
Epson's website, where you'd click on the 
Printers & All-in-One Printers link under 
Get Drivers & Support (as shown here). 
Note: Even if you're not an Epson user, 
still follow along (you'll see why). 



Step Two: 

Once you get to Drivers & Support, find 
your particular printer in the list. Click on 
that link, and on the next page, click on 
Drivers & Downloads (choose Windows 
or Macintosh). On that page is a link to 
the printer's Premium ICC Profiles page. 



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► 364 



Chapter 11 



Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



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Step Three: 

When you click that link, a page appears 
with a list of Mac and Windows ICC 
profiles for Epson's papers and printers. 
I primarily print on two papers: (1) Epson's 
Ultra Premium Photo Paper Luster, and 
(2) Epson's Velvet Fine Art paper. So, I'd 
download the ICC profiles for them under 
Glossy Papers (as shown here) and Fine 
Art Papers (at the bottom of the window). 
They download onto your computer, and 
you just double-click the installer for each 
one, and they're added to your list of pro- 
files in Photoshop (I'll show how to choose 
them in the Print dialog a little later). That's 
it — you download them, double-click to 
install, and they'll be waiting for you in 
Photoshop's print dialog. Easy enough. 
But what if you're not using Epson paper? 
Or if you have a different printer, like a 
Canon or an HP? 



Step Four: 

We'll tackle the different paper issue 
first (because they're tied together). 
I mentioned earlier that I usually print 
on Epson papers. I say usually because 
sometimes I want a final print that fits 
in a 16x20" standard pre-made frame, 
without having to cut or trim the photo. 
In those cases, I use Red River Paper's 
16x20" Ultra Pro Satin instead (which is 
very much like Epson's Ultra Premium 
Luster, but it's already pre-cut to 16x20"). 
So, even though you're printing on an 
Epson printer, now you'd go to Red River 
Paper's site (www.redriverpaper.com) 
to find their color profiles for my other 
printer — the Epson 3880. (Remember, 
profiles come from the company that 
makes the paper.) On the Red River 
Paper homepage is a link for Premium 
Photographic Inkjet Papers, so click 
on that. 

(Continued) 



Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management 



Chapter 11 



365 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

Once you click that link, things get easier, 
because on the left side of the next page 
(under Helpful Info) is a clear, direct link 
right to their free downloadable color 
profiles (as seen here). Making profiles 
easy to find like this is extremely rare (it's 
almost too easy — it must be a trap, right?). 
So, click on that Color Profiles link and it 
takes you right to the profiles for Epson 
printers, as seen in Step Six (how sweet 
is that?). 



Step Six: 

Under the section named Epson Wide 
Format, there's a direct link to the Epson 
Pro 3880 (as shown here), but did you also 
notice that there are ICC Color profiles 
for the Canon printers, as well? See, the 
process is the same for other printers, but 
be aware: although HP and Canon both 
make pro-quality photo printers, Epson 
had the pro market to itself for quite a 
while, so while Epson profiles are created 
by most major paper manufacturers, you 
may not always find paper profiles for HP 
and Canon printers. As you can see at 
Red River, they widely support Epson, and 
some Canon profiles are there, too, but 
there are only a few for HP. That doesn't 
mean this won't change, but as of the 
writing of this book, that's the reality. 
Speaking of change — the look and navi- 
gation of websites change pretty regu- 
larly, so if these sites look different when 
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can freak out, but just a little. 






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► 366 



Chapter 11 



Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



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Step Seven: 

Although profiles from Epson's website 
come with an installer, in Red River's case 
(and in the case of many other paper man- 
ufacturers), you just get the profile (shown 
here) and instructions, so you install it 
yourself (don't worry — it's easy). On a PC, 
just Right-click on the profile and choose 
Install Profile. Easy enough. On a Mac, 
go to your hard disk, open your Library 
folder, and open your ColorSync folder, 
where you'll see a Profiles folder. Just drag 
the file in there and you're set (in Photo- 
shop CS6, you don't even have to restart 
Photoshop — it automatically updates). 



Step Eight: 

Now, you'll access your profile by choos- 
ing Print from Photoshop's File menu. 
In the Print dialog, change the Color 
Handling pop-up menu to Photoshop 
Manages Color. Then, click on the Printer 
Profile pop-up menu, and your new color 
profile(s) will appear (as shown here). In 
our example, I'm printing to an Epson 
3880 using Red River's Ultra Pro Satin 
paper, so that's what I'm choosing here 
as my printer profile (it's named RR UPSat 
Ep3880.icc). More on using these color 
profiles later in this chapter. 

TIP: Creating Your Own Profiles 

You can also pay an outside service to 
create a custom profile for your printer. 
You print a test sheet (which they pro- 
vide), overnight it to them, and they'll 
use an expensive colorimeter to mea- 
sure your test print and create a custom 
profile. The catch: it's only good for that 
printer, on that paper, with that ink. If any- 
thing changes, your custom profile is just 
about worthless. Of course, you could 
do your own personal printer profiling 
(using something like one of X-Rite's i1 
Solutions), so you can re-profile each time 
you change paper or inks. It's really deter- 
mined by your fussiness/time/money 
factor (if you know what I mean). 



Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management 



Chapter 11 



367 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Making the Print 

(Finally, It All 

Comes Together) 



Okay, so at this point, you've set Photoshop to the proper color space for the type 
of photo you're going to be printing (RAW, JPEG, TIFF, etc., see page 356), you've 
hardware calibrated your monitor (see page 361), and you've even downloaded a 
printer profile for the exact printer model and style of paper you're printing on. 
In short — you're there. Luckily, you only have to do all that stuff once — now we can 
just sit back and print. Well, pretty much. Also, in CS6, Adobe added some nice 
new tweaks to the Photoshop Print Settings dialog, which we'll cover here. 



Step One: 

Go under Photoshop's File menu and 
choose Print (as shown here) or just 
press Command-P (PC: Ctrl-P). 



Step Two: 

When the Photoshop Print Settings dia- 
log appears, let's choose your printer first. 
At the top right, choose the printer you 
want to print to from the Printer pop-up 
menu (here, I'm going to be printing to my 
Epson Stylus Pro 3880). You can choose 
your page orientation by clicking on the 
portrait and landscape Layout icons at the 
bottom of the Printer Setup section (as 
shown here). By the way, if you've used 
this dialog before in previous versions of 
Photoshop, you'll be happy to know that 
now, in Photoshop CS6, you can actually 
resize the dialog to any size you'd like by 
clicking on the bottom-right corner and 
dragging it out. Here I dragged it out 
to the right, so I could see my preview 
much larger, and it was at that moment 
that I realized that I wasn't seeing the 
full image (it's not cropped that tight to 
the top of her head). 



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► 368 



Chapter 11 



Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



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Step Three: 

If you want your image to fit fully on the 
page, scroll down to the Position and Size 
section and turn on the Scale to Fit Media 
checkbox (as shown here) and it scales the 
image down in size, so the entire image 
fits on the page without being cropped 
(now you can see the rest of her hat, and 
the image is much wider than what we 
saw back in Step Two). Just so you know: 
I have no problem turning this Scale to Fit 
Media checkbox on if my image is going 
to shrink in size to fit the paper, but if turn- 
ing that on would wind up increasing the 
size, I'll hit the Cancel button and go to 
the Image Size dialog (under the Image 
menu) and resize it there, so I have control 
over the upsizing process (see page 139). 



Step Four: 

While we're talking about size; there's 
another new Print feature added in 
Photoshop CS6 called Print Selected 
Area, and it gives you the ability to just 
print part of your image (so, it's kind of 
like cropping the print without actually 
cropping the image itself). You do this 
in the Position and Size section of the 
dialog by turning on the Print Selected 
Area checkbox. When you turn this on, 
you'll see little arrows appear around 
the corners of your image. Just click- 
and-drag these in toward your image, 
and as you do, it darkens the areas to 
be cropped away (as seen here, where 
I've dragged those arrows on the top 
left, top right, and lower left). Now, only 
the area that's not darkened will actually 
wind up being printed on the page. 



(Continued) 



Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management Chapter 11 36<H 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

Another new resizing feature added in 
Photoshop CS6 is the ability to just click- 
and-drag on your photo to reposition and/ 
or resize it (I know what you're thinking: 
"Couldn't we always do that?" Believe it 
or not, no). To use this new feature, first 
make sure the Scale to Fit Media check- 
box is turned off, and then click-and-drag 
the image around so you can reach a cor- 
ner handle surrounding your image. Then, 
just click-and-drag a corner handle inward, 
and it resizes your image (kind of like Free 
Transform does, but you don't have to 
hold the Shift key to keep the resizing 
proportional — it does that automatically). 
Here, I scaled the image down in size 
and positioned it where I wanted by just 
clicking-and-dragging it in the preview 
area. Now, before we go on to the next 
step, you're probably wondering what 
that lined area around the outside edge 
of your paper is all about. That's showing 
you where the margins are (the non-print- 
able areas of your paper). 



Step Six: 

If you want to be able to print all the way 
to the border (and have those margin 
lines and non-printable areas go away), 
all you have to do is to set your margins 
to inches. You do this by clicking on 
the Print Settings button in the top right 
of the dialog (it's shown circled here in 
red) to bring up your OS Print (PC: Printer 
Properties) dialog (shown here at the bot- 
tom). {Note: I use Epson printers, but if 
you have a Canon or HP, the dialog will 
have the same basic function, just in a dif- 
ferent layout.) When you choose a paper 
size that is borderless (as shown here), you 
can now print to the edges of the paper 
(well, as long as your printer supports 
edge-to-edge printing, of course). Now, 
take a look at the preview — the margin 
area lines are gone. 







Printer Setup 
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► 370 



Chapter 11 



Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



: 



Photoshop Print Settings 



Photoshop Print Settings 



Printer Setup 
Printer: 



Copies: 
Layout: 



' Ep5onStylusPro3880-lE8107 



|l (Prim Settings...) 



TTj & 



▼ Color Management 

Please use Adobe Color Printer Utility if you need to 
print with No Color Mana g ement. 

Document Profi 1 

Color Handling: 

Printer Profile: 

_ Send 16-bit Data 




1 Normal Printing |W| - 



Rendering Intent: [ Relative Colorimetric hfr^ 
M Black Point Compensation 



T Description 

To preserve appearance, Photoshop will perform any necessary conversions lo ce 
numbers appropriate for your selected printer. 



T Position and Size 
I — Position — 



Top. 



(_ Cancel ) (_ Done j ^ 



Printer Setup 
Printer: 



Epso nStyl u s Pro3 8 8 0- 1 ES 10 7 \-$\ & 



Copies. 1 I ( Print Settings...) 

Layout: ffl||| 



Epson Stylus Pro 3880_3S85_3890 Archival Matte Pa per 

Epson Stylus Pro 3880_3885_3S9D EnhancedMattePaper 

Epson Stylus Pro 3880_388S_3890 EpsonProofiingPaperWhiteSemimatte 

Epson Stylus Pro 3880_3S8S_3890 PhotoQuality InkJet Paper 

Epson Stylus Pro 3880_3&8S_389Cr PhotoQuality I nkJetPapertLD) 

Epson Stylus Pro 3880_388S_3890 PremiumGlossyPhotoPaper 



Epson Stylus Pro 3Bfi0_388S_3890 PremiumSemiglossPhotoPaper 

Epson Stylus Pro 3880_3SS5_3890 Standard 

Epson Stylus Pro 3B80_3S8S_3S&0 UltraSmoothFineArtPaper 

Epson Stylus Pro 3880_3SSS_3S90 VelvetFineArt Paper 

Epson Stylus Pro 3880_3&8$_3S90 WatercolorPaper-RadiantWhite 

sRGB IEC61966-2.1 

S-2S-12 

S_4_12 

Apple iMac-2 

CIE RGB 

Display 

e-sRGB 

Generic RGB Profile 

HDTV [Rec 709) 

hp color LaserJet RGB v402 

iMac 

iMac-l_apr 11 

Monitor_6-25-10_l 

PAL/SECAM 

ROMM-RCB 

RR UPSat Ep 3 880. ice 

Scott's Profile 

SDTV NTSC 

SDTV PAL 




Step Seven: 

Okay, now let's turn on our Color Man- 
agement, so our prints will match what 
we see onscreen. In the Color Manage- 
ment section, you'll see that, by default, 
the Color Handling is set up to have your 
printer manage colors (instead of Photo- 
shop). You really only want to choose 
this if you weren't able to download any 
printer/paper profiles for your printer. 
Having your printer manage colors like 
this is your backup plan, not your first 
choice. But, today's printers have gotten 
to the point that if you have to go with 
this, it still does a decent job (that wasn't 
the case just a few years ago). Instead, I 
recommend that you choose Photoshop 
Manages Colors (as shown here). That 
way, it uses the color profile we down- 
loaded earlier for our printer and paper 
combination, which will give us the best 
possible match. 



Step Eight: 

Next, you'll need to choose that 
printer/paper profile you downloaded 
and installed earlier. So, from the Printer 
Profile pop-up menu, choose the printer/ 
paper profile that matches your printer 
and paper (here, I'll choose the profile 
for Ultra Premium Photo Paper Luster). 
Now, Photoshop and the printer know 
exactly which paper I'll be printing on, 
and it's optimized to give us the best 
possible color print on that printer using 
that paper (this is very important, because 
this sends a whole series of instructions to 
the printer, including everything from the 
amount of ink it should lay down, to the 
drying time of the paper, to the proper 
platen gap for the printer, and so on). 

(Continued) 



Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management 



Chapter 11 



371 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Nine: 

Next, you'll need to choose the Render- 
ing Intent. There are four choices here, 
but only two I recommend: either Relative 
Colorimetric (which is the default setting) 
or Perceptual. Here's the thing: I've had 
printers where I got the best looking prints 
with my Rendering Intent set to Percep- 
tual, but currently, on my Epson Stylus 
Pro 3880, I get better results when it's set 
to Relative Colorimetric. So, which one 
gives the best results for your printer? 
I recommend printing a photo once using 
Perceptual, then printing the same photo 
using Relative Colorimetric, and when you 
compare the two, you'll know. 

TIP: The Gamut Warning Isn't for Us 

The Gamut Warning checkbox (beneath 
the preview area) is not designed for use 
when printing to a color inkjet (like we are 
here) or any other RGB printer. It warns 
you if colors are outside the printable 
range for a CMYK printing press, so un- 
less you are outputting to a printing 
press, you can leave this turned off. 

Step 10: 

Lastly, just make sure the Black Point 
Compensation checkbox is turned on (it 
should be by default) to help maintain 
more detail and color in the shadow areas. 
Now, click the Print Settings button in the 
top-right corner (we're not quite done yet). 

WARNING: If you're printing to a color 
inkjet printer, don't ever convert your 
photo to CMYK format (even though you 
may be tempted to because your printer 
uses cyan, magenta, yellow, and black 
inks). The conversion from RGB to CMYK 
inks happens within the printer itself, and 
if you do it first in Photoshop, your printer 
will attempt to convert it again in the 
printer, and your printed colors will be 
way off. 



Photoshop Print Settings 




Photoshop Print Settings 




Printer: [ EpsonStylusPro3aa0-lEfilQ7 h»| flf 

Copies. 1 j (_ Print Settings...} 

Layout: ffiJH 



▼ Color Management 

Please use Adobe Color Printer Utility if you need to 
print with No Color Mana g ement. 

Document Profile: sRGB IEC61966-2.1 



Color Handling: [ Photoshop Manages Colors 



"1 



Printer Profile: I sRGB IEC61966-2.1 

□ Send 16-bit Data 



~> 



| Normal Printin Perceptual 
Saturation 
Rendering Intent: 



T Description 

and shifts all color* accordingly. Oui-of-gamut colors are shifted to the closes! 
reproducible color in the destination cellar space. Relative cola rime trie preserver 
more nf the original colore In an image thin Perceptual. 



" Position and Size 
— Position — 



Top: 1 1.243 ~| Left: 1 0.979 



( Done ) (_ 



Printer Setup 


Printer: EpsonStylusPro38S0-lEB107 


M & 






Copies: ll £ Print Settings...} 

Layout: H[|] 



▼ Color Management 

Please use Adobe Color Printer Utility if you need to 
print w :h \c- L c I o i Management. 

Document Profile: sRGB IEC61966-2.1 



Color Handling: ! Photoshop Manages Colors 



Printer Profile: [ sRGB IEC61S66-2.1 
~' Send 16-bit Data 
[ Normal Printing r-fr^ 



Rendering Intent: [ Relative Colorimetric hr^ 



4 



Black Point Compensation 



▼ Description 

Adjusts for differences in black points when converting colors. If checked, the full 
range of the source space is mapped tu that of the destination space. This is useful 
if ycrnr document and ynur printer have about the same size gamut, but one has a 



" Position and Size 
Position — 



lop: 



f_ Cancel } [ Done } ^ 



► 372 



Chapter 11 



Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



Copies 
Paper Size 



F-psonStylusPro3 880-1E6107 


I'M 1-1 


Layout 

Color Matching 
Paper Handling 
Cover Page 
Scheduler 


1 

inches 



Page Layout Settings 
Advanced Media Control 



Page Setij Additiorial Settings 

Media Typ Supply Levels 
J Summary 



and) 



Ti 



Print Mode: 

Color Mode: 

Output Resolution: 



AccuPhoto HD2 



Hp^ LJ 16 Bit Output 



EPSON Standard CsRCB} 



~ 



SuperPhoto - 1440 dpi 



H 



S High Speed 

LJ Flip Horizontal 

□ Finest Detail 

Print quality in the top and bottom areas may decline or the area may be smeared 

depending Dn the media. 

Please refer to your manual for details.. 



(?) >„ PDFt " j ( Preview ; 



("Cancel") 



Printer: j EpsonStylusPro3SS0-lE8107 hfrj Q 
Presets: • Standard 



3 



Copies: |^1 J S Collated 

Paper Size: f US Letter (Sheet ... 14^ 8.50 by 11 .00 inches 



-j Printer Settings 



Advanced Color Settings ' 



Page Setup: Sheet Feeder- Borderless (Auto Expand} 



Media Type: ' _ Ultra Premium Photo Paper Luster 
Ink: I Photo Black 



T'i 



: 



Print Mode: ' AccuPhoto HD2 



~hfr) G 16 Bit Output 



Color Mode: [ Off (Mo Color Management) ^| 
Output Resolution: ' SuperPhoto - 2880 dpi <T1 



r^High Speed 

LJ Flip Horizontal 

G Finest Detail 

Print quality in the top and bottom areas may decline or the area may be smeared 

depending on the media. 

Please refer to your manual for details. 



(?) I PDFt i ( Preview ) 



( Cancel j 



Step 11: 

In your OS Print (PC: Printer Properties) 
dialog (again, I use Epson printers, so your 
dialog may look different), your printer 
will already be chosen in the Printer pop- 
up menu. On a PC, you'll skip the Print 
dialog and just see your printer's options. 
From the Layout pop-up menu, choose 
Print Settings (as shown here), so we can 
configure the printer to give us the best- 
quality prints. 

WARNING: From this point on, what 
appears in the Layout pop-up menu is 
contingent on your particular printer's 
options. You may or may not be able to 
access these same settings, so you may 
need to view each option to find the set- 
tings you need to adjust. If you're using a 
Windows PC, you may have to click on the 
Advanced tab or an Advanced button to 
be able to choose from similar settings. 



Step 12: 

First, from the Media Type pop-up menu, 
choose your paper type. Then, choose 
your Output Resolution from that pop-up 
menu (on a PC, choose Quality Options 
from the Print Quality pop-up menu, then 
use the slider to set the quality level). I 
use SuperPhoto - 2880 dpi, because I 
want to get the highest possible quality 
(little known fact: at 2880 dpi, it doesn't 
use more ink — it just takes longer). Next, 
choose Off (No Color Management) 
from the Color Mode pop-up menu (on 
a PC, click on the Custom radio button 
and choose Off [No Color Adjustment] 
from the Mode pop-up menu). You want 
no color adjustment from your printer — 
you're letting Photoshop manage your 
color instead. Now you're ready to print, 
so click the Save (PC: OK) button to go 
back to Photoshop's Print dialog, and hit 
the Print button to get prints that match 
your screen, as you've now color man- 
aged your photo from beginning to end. 



Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management 



Chapter 11 



373 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Soft Proofing 
in Photoshop 



This is only the second edition of this book to include how to do soft proofing, 
because I don't use — or recommend — soft proofing myself, and I don't want 
to include techniques I don't really use. But, I have had so many people ask me 
about it, I felt I had to include it. Just know that my advice about this is simple: 
nothing beats a real proof. If you're serious about making great prints, make a test 
print — soft proofing just gives you a hint of what it might look like. A test print 
is what it actually looks like. Okay, I'm off my soap box. Here's how it's done: 



Step One: 

Start by downloading the free color 
profile from the company that makes 
the paper you're going to be print- 
ing on (see page 364 for where to 
get these and how to install them). 
Open the image you want to soft 
proof, then under the View menu, 
under Proof Setup, choose Custom 
(as shown here). 



Step Two: 

When the Customize Proof Condition 
dialog appears, from the Device to Sim- 
ulate pop-up menu, choose the color 
profile for the printer/paper combo you'll 
be using (here, I've chosen an Epson 
Stylus Pro 3880 printing to Velvet Fine 
Art Paper). Next, choose the Rendering 
Intent (see page 372 for more on this), 
and make sure you leave Black Point 
Compensation turned on. Down in the 
Display Options (On-Screen) section, 
leave Simulate Paper Color and Simulate 
Black Ink both turned off. You can toggle 
the Preview checkbox on/off to see a 
before/after of the simulation of what 
your print might look like with that profile 
on that paper (though, of course, it can't 
simulate how your sharpening might look 
on different papers, just the color. Kinda). 
Give it a try and then compare it with 
a real test print, and you'll be able to 
determine if soft proofing is for you. 



Filter 3D 


| Window Help 






Proof Colors 3£Y 

Gamut Warning OSY 
Pixel Aspect Ratio ► 
Pixel Aspect Ratio Correction 
32-bit Preview Options,.. 

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Zoom Out &~ 

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.. . r , _ A .,^ 




• Working CMYK 
Working Cyan Plate 

Working Magenta Plate 
Working Yellow Plate 
Working Black Plate 
Working CMY Plates 

Legacy Macintosh RGB (Gamma l.S) 
Internet Standard RGB {sRGB) 
Monitor RGB 

Color Blindness - Protanopia-type 
Color Blindness - Deuteranopia-type 




Screen Mode ► 




• Extras 3EH 
Show ► 








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Snap Cr&; 
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Clear Guides 
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Customize Proof Condition 



Custom Proof Condition: I Custom 




i — Proof Conditions 



Device to Simulate: [ Epson Stylus Pro 38&0_3885_3&9Q VelvetFineArtPaperMH 
□ Preserve RGB Numbers 



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M 



Black Point Compensation 



— Display Options [On-Screer) 

[_J Simulate Paper Color 
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(_ Cancel 

(" Load... ' 
(_ Save... J 
H Preview 



► 374 



Chapter 11 



Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



Okay, what do you do if you followed all these steps — you've hardware calibrated 
your monitor, you've got the right paper profiles, and color profiles, and profiles 
of profiles, and so on, and you've carefully turned on every checkbox, chosen all 
the right color profiles, and you've done everything right — but the print still doesn't 

match what you see onscreen? You know what we do? We fix it in Photoshop. 

That's right — we make some simple tweaks that get the image looking right fast. 



What to Do If the 
Print Still Doesn't 
Match Your Screen 





>i 





Your Print Is Too Dark 

This is one of the most common prob- 
lems, and it's mostly because today's 
monitors are so much more incredibly 
brighter (either that, or you're literally 
viewing your images in a room that's too 
dark). Luckily, this is an easy fix and here's 
what I do: Press Command-J (PC: Ctrl-J) 
to duplicate the Background layer, then 
at the top of the Layers panel, change 
the layer blend mode to Screen to make 
everything much brighter. Now, lower 
the Opacity of this layer to 25% and (this 
is key here) make a test print. Next, look 
at the print, and see if it's a perfect match, 
or if it's still too dark. If it's still too dark, 
set the Opacity to 35% and make another 
test print. It'll probably take a few test 
prints to nail it, but once you do, your 
problem is solved (by the way, this is a 
great thing to make into an action). 



Your Print Is Too Light 

This is less likely, but just as easy to fix. 
Duplicate the Background layer, then 
change the layer blend mode to Multiply 
to make everything darker. Now, lower 
the Opacity of this layer to 20% and make 
a test print. Again, you may have to make 
a few test prints to get the right amount, 
but once you've got it, you've got it. Now, 
make that into an action (name it some- 
thing like "Prep for Print") and any time 
you print, just run that action first. 



(Continued) 



Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management Chapter 11 375 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Your Print Is Too Red (Blue, etc.) 

This is one you might run into if your 
print has some sort of color cast. First, 
before you mess with the image, press 
the letter F on your keyboard to put 
a solid gray background behind your 
photo, and then just look to see if the 
image onscreen actually has too much 
red. If it does, then press Command-U 
(PC: Ctrl-U) to bring up Hue/Saturation. 
From the second pop-up menu, choose 
Reds, then lower the Saturation amount 
to -20%, and then (you knew this was 
coming, right?) make a test print. You'll 
then know if 20% was too much, too 
little, or just right. Once you make a few 
test prints and nail it, save those steps 
as an action and run it before you print 
each time. 



Your Print Has Visible Banding 

The more you've tweaked an image, the 
more likely you'll run into this (where the 
colors have visible bands, rather than just 
smoothly graduating from color to color. 
It's most often seen in blue skies). There 
are two ways to deal with this: If you shot 
in RAW, make sure you keep the image 
in 16-bit mode (don't have it down sam- 
ple to 8-bit when it leaves Camera Raw). 
Click the Workflow Options link beneath 
the Preview area in Camera Raw, and 
choose 16 Bits/Channel from the Depth 
pop-up menu. Stay in 16-bit through the 
entire printing process. If your original 
was a JPEG, then there's no going back 
to a 16-bit original (and just converting 
to 16-bit mode does nothing), so instead 
try this: Go under the Filter menu, under 
Noise, and choose Add Noise. In the 
dialog, set the Amount to 4%, click on 
the Gaussian radio button, and turn on 
the Monochromatic checkbox. You'll 
see the noise onscreen, but it disap- 
pears when you print the image (and 
usually, the banding disappears right 
along with it). 



Hue /Saturation 



Preset: Custom 



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Hue: 









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3 



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h^ Amount: \ Standard 



!_J Open in Photoshop as Smart Objects 




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Amount: 

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S Monochromatic 



► 376 



Chapter 11 



Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



For reasons known only to a secret society of Adobe engineers (who meet in 

underground catacombs buried deep below Adobe's headquarters and lit solely 

by torches), they chose to remove the Contact Sheet feature from the previous 

version of Photoshop (CS5). I guess they assumed we'd use the PDF Contact Sheet 

in Bridge, which can only mean they never actually tried it themselves. Thankfully, 

after the public stormed Adobe's headquarters with axes and pitchforks, they 

brought Contact Sheet II back in CS6, and the balance of power has been 

restored to the kingdom. Here's how to unleash its wrath: 



Making Contact Sheets 
(Yup, It's Back!) 



Photoshop 


9 Edit Image 


Layer 


Type S 


elect r 


' New... 




3GN 




Open... 

Browse in Bridge. 




SO 
X3SO 






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Open Recent 


► 






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Close All 










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ridge... 


-osw 






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ffiS 






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Check In.., 
Save for Web... 




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Export 




> 














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Batch... 


Scripts 




► 


PDF Presentation... 
Create Droplet... 

Crop and Straighten Photos 


File Info... 




XfrSI 


Print... 




ffiP 








Print One Copy 




XOMP 


Nik Selective Tool... 



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Step One: 

To launch Contact Sheet II (the II part 
comes from the fact that this is the sec- 
ond version of this automated script, a 
big improvement over the first one. But, 
honestly when I heard Adobe was bring- 
ing this back, I was hoping for Contact 
Sheet III. Sigh), go under the File menu, 
under Automate, and choose Contact 
Sheet II (as shown here). 



Step Two: 

This brings up the Contact Sheet II 
dialog, where you get to choose how 
your contact sheet will look. You start 
at the top by clicking on the Choose 
button and selecting which folder of 
images you want to create a contact 
sheet of. In the next section down, Doc- 
ument, you get to choose the size and 
resolution of your contact sheet. In our 
example, we're going to make a wide 
10x8" sheet at a resolution of 240 ppi 
(pretty standard resolution for a color 
inkjet printer). I always leave the Flatten 
All Layers checkbox turned on, so when 
it's done I'm not looking in my Layers 
panel and seeing 36 different layers, 
and that's pretty much what you'll get 
if you choose not to flatten all layers. 

(Continued) 



Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management 



Chapter 11 



377 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Three: 

The next section down, Thumbnails, is 
where you choose how many columns 
and rows you want. In our example, we're 
going to do six across, with three rows 
deep. I generally leave the Use Auto- 
Spacing checkbox turned on, because 
it has Photoshop do the math to figure 
out how to make the thumbnails in your 
contact sheet as large as possible. How- 
ever, if you turn that checkbox off, you 
can type in what you'd like for your verti- 
cal and horizontal spacing (the only time 
I would do this is if I wanted more space 
along the top and sides. As you'll see in 
the next step, this one has them spread 
out, so they're really close to the side 
edges of the paper and pretty darn 
close to the top and bottom). 



Step Four: 

The last section, at the bottom of the 
dialog, is pretty important (even though 
I don't have it turned on here), and that 
is the option for the filename of each 
photo to appear below the thumbnail. 
If you're using this as a proof sheet for a 
client, that's pretty important. My only 
recommendation for this would be to 
use a smaller font size than the default 
12 point, which always seems too large 
to me (especially if you have a long file- 
name). Try 9 or 10 point, and I also would 
try a sans serif font, like Myriad Pro (rather 
than the default Minion Pro), simply be- 
cause it looks better. Now, click the OK 
button up top, and in about 20 or 30 sec- 
onds, the contact sheet you see here 
appears. This particular one uses 18 
photos (6 columns by 3 rows), but if your 
folder contains more than 18 photos, it 
just keeps making more contact sheets 
until every photo is accounted for. 



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► 378 



Chapter 11 



Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



Photoshop Killer Tips 



Using CS6 on a MacBook Pro? 

Then you've probably experienced a weird 
thing where all of a sudden your screen 
rotates, or your image suddenly zooms 
in (or out). It's because the track pad on 
a MacBook Pro supports Gestures, which 
are great for most things, but tend to drive 
you insane when using Photoshop. You can 
turn off Gestures by pressing Command-K 
(PC: Ctrl-K) to bring up Photoshop's Pref- 
erences, then click on Interface (in the list 
on the left) and, in the Options section, 
turn off the Enable Gestures checkbox. 



■ Show Men j Colors 

S Show Tool Tips 

^Enable Gestures 
locking ^ 

pg Enable Text Drop Shadows 






ight 



Canceling an Adjustment Layer Edit 

If you're working with an adjustment layer, 
and you want to cancel your edit and re- 
turn to the adjustment defaults, click the 
curved arrow at the bottom of the Proper- 
ties panel. If you don't want the adjustment 
layer at all, you can quickly delete it by 
clicking on the Trash icon, also at the 
bottom of the panel. 




What's That * Up in Your 
Document's Title Bar Mean? 

That's just letting you know that the image 

you're working on has an embedded color 

profile that's different from the one you 

chose in Photoshop (for example, you'd 

see this if you brought an image over from 

Lightroom, whose default color space is 



^ Making the PfinLjpg @ 2S% (RGB/S*) 



ProPhoto RGB, but Photoshop's default 
color space is sRGB, so since the two don't 
match, it just puts that asterisk up top in 
case you care). 

Tip for Finding Out Which Fonts 
Look Best with Your Layout 

This is a handy tip, especially if you're do- 
ing poster layouts, and you want to find 
just the right font to complement your 
photo. Go ahead and create some type, 
then double-click on the Type layer's 
thumbnail in the Layers panel to select 







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all your type. Now, click your cursor once 
in the Font field up in the Options Bar, 
and you can use the Up/Down Arrow 
keys on your keyboard to scroll through 
all the installed fonts on your system, 
and your highlighted type changes live 
onscreen as you do. 

Refining Your Masks 
Using Color Range 

If you've created a layer mask, and want to 

tweak it a bit, you can add the Color Range 

feature as part of your tweaking arsenal. 

I use this to quickly select images that are 

on a white background. Try this: Click on 

the Add Layer Mask icon at the bottom 

of the Layers panel (you'll have to be on 



a duplicate or unlocked layer), then go 
under the Select menu, and choose Color 
Range. With the first Eyedropper tool on 
the left (below the Save button), click on 
the background once (not in the image 
itself, in the mask preview right there in 
the Color Range dialog), and then raise 
the Fuzziness amount until it selects the 
background. That usually does most of the 
masking for me. Click OK, and now you can 
quickly paint in any missing parts using the 
Brush tool set to paint in black. This gives 
you a mask of the background selection. 
To make your mask a selection of your sub- 
ject, make sure the mask is selected, and 
press Command-I (PC: Ctrl-I) to Invert it. 

Color Range 



Select: ' ft Sampled Colors 



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_ Detect Faces 
LJ Localized Color Clusters 
Fuzziness: 124 



^r 



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Selection Preview: I None 



Change Your Background 
Canvas Color 

By default, the area around your docu- 
ment is a dark gray color, but you can 
choose any color you'd like by just Right- 
clicking anywhere on that gray canvas 
area and choosing Select Custom Color 
from the pop-up menu. 




Step-by-Step Printing and Color Management 



Chapter 11 



379 < 




Photo by Scott Kelby Exposure: 1/125 sec | Focal Length: 116 mm Aperture Value: //8 



Chapter 12 Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 




Videodrome 

editing DSLR video in photoshop 



The name of this chapter comes from the 1983 movie of 
the same name starring Debbie Harry, lead singer of the 
'80s band Blondie, in what I can only imagine was her film 
debut and simultaneous film career exit, since I never heard 
of Debbie Harry starring in any other movies. Now, in all 
honesty, I might be jumping the gun on this one, so in all 
fairness to Ms. Harry, I'm pausing this chapter intro right 
now to go and check the official online source for anything 
to do with movies, and that is, of course, www.homedepot 
.com (okay, not really, but I gotta tell ya, they had a pretty 
sweet deal on a DeWalt 18-Volt Vi in. Cordless Impact 
Wrench). Anyway, instead, I went and checked IMDb (the 
Internet Movie Database), and I have to tell you, I was pretty 
shocked to find out that Debbie Harry was actually listed 
as an actress in 53 movies and TV shows. 53! Digging a 
little deeper (not really), I learned that none of those were 
put together using Photoshop's built-in video capabilities, 
because prior to CS6, Photoshop barely had any serious 



video editing capabilities. I mean, you could do a few things, 
but nothing like the complexity you see in Debbie Harry's 
2011 (pre-CS6) movie short Pipe Dreams, where she played 
Iris, a young undocumented worker from Ecuador. (Oh, I can 
see where this is going. They never have their documenta- 
tion, now, do they?) According to IMBb, the movie pretty 
much takes place in an aging smoking-pipe manufacturing 
plant. Geesh — not that tired old scenario again. I can prob- 
ably tell you the ending already. Let me guess: she gets 
hooked on tobacco products and winds up hitch-hiking to 
North Carolina, where she meets an aging nicotine salesman 
from Raleigh who convinces her to become a documented 
worker, and then the two open a small pet bakery/mobile 
spray-tanning business in Jacksonville, against the wishes 
of her controlling Canadian rebel-fighting parents and 
Kreshnik, her half-blind Albanian ex-fiance and father 
of their illegitimate teacup schnauzer, Mr. Buttersticks. 
Tell me you didn't see that one coming, right? 



381 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Four Things You'll 

Want to Know Now 

About Creating Video 

in Photoshop CS6 



I truly believe this video feature in Photoshop is a game changer. You can hardly 
find a digital camera today (DSLR or point-and-shoot) that doesn't shoot HD-quality 
video, yet most of the photographers I talk to that have shot video with their DSLR 
just have a bunch of individual movie clips in a folder on their computer, and never 
create a movie with them. I asked why and they basically said, "Photoshop is hard 
enough. I don't have time to learn a video-editing program." That's why I think this 
is so important. Now, we can edit video in a program we already know, and finally, 
we'll start turning those clips into movies. 



Q It Helps to Have Lots of RAM 

When it comes to video, more is more. 
Ideally, you'd have a minimum of 8 GB 
of RAM, but the more the merrier, be- 
cause unlike still images, video has to 
"render" (which it does in RAM), and the 
more RAM you have, the faster you'll be 
able to preview clips without them being 
jumpy or jittery. 



Q It's Ideal for Making 
Short Movies 

Although you could make a 20- or 
30-minute movie in Photoshop, it's 
really best suited for short movies — the 
kind of videos wedding photographers 
might create, or promo videos for a pho- 
tographer's website, or short demos, or 
commercials. If you need to make some- 
thing longer and more complex, then you 
should make a number of short movies in 
Photoshop, and then combine all these 
shorter clips into one longer final version 
at the end. If you're thinking of making an 
epic motion picture, you should probably 
choose something made for that type of 
stuff, like Premiere Pro. 





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Q You Can Apply Photoshop 
Adjustments and Filters to 
Your Movies 

I think one of the best things about 
editing video in Photoshop is that you 
get to use the same tools you're already 
familiar with from working on digital pho- 
tos. We're talking everything from Levels 
and Curves adjustments, to filters like 
Gaussian Blur and Unsharp Mask, and 
you resize things using Free Transform. 
Once you learn the timeline (which you'll 
do in this chapter), then the rest seems 
very familiar. 



Q What You See Onscreen Is 
Different When You Do Video 

You can't just click on things (like a video 
clip or a Type layer) and have them dis- 
play onscreen. If you want to see some- 
thing, you have to move the playhead 
in the timeline to the spot in the movie 
where that thing appears. That's because 
wherever the playhead is right now is 
what you're seeing onscreen. This takes a 
bit of getting used to. For example, here 
I clicked on the first clip to select it, and 
in regular Photoshop thinking, that would 
mean, "Hey, I want to see this clip," but if 
you look at the playhead (the blue knob 
with the red vertical line, circled in red 
here), it's on the second clip, and what's 
under the playhead is what you see on- 
screen. That's exactly what you're seeing 
here — that part of the second clip. You'll 
get used to it, but it'll catch you a few 
times where you're just sitting there won- 
dering, "Why isn't it showing my clip?" 
Now when that happens, you'll go look 
to see where the playhead is. 



Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



Chapter 12 



383 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Opening Your 

Video Clips 

into Photoshop 



You can open a video clip to start building your movie like it was any other file, 
so getting a clip to open in Photoshop is easy (especially since Photoshop supports 
all the most common movie file formats found in DSLRs), but this isn't about just 
opening a video clip in Photoshop to start your movie project. This is really about 
what to do after you've started your video project, because knowing what to do 
next (how to add more clips to your movie) can save you a lot of time and frustration. 
Later, you'll get to mix video and still (and have audio, as well), so learning this first is 
worth the quick read. 



Step One: 

Once your movie clips have been 
imported from your DSLR onto your 
computer, you can open these clips in 
Photoshop just like you would any other 
file — by going under the File menu and 
choosing Open, or double-clicking on 
a video clip in Mini Bridge, which is what 
I did here (go ahead and open a video clip. 
If you don't have one, you can download 
the ones I'm using here). When it opens, 
Photoshop knows it's a video file and it 
automatically opens the Timeline panel 
across the bottom (seen here), which 
is where we put our movie together. 
The length of the blue bar corresponds 
to how long the video is (in minutes and 
seconds). The longer the bar, the longer 
the video clip. 



Step Two: 

If you want to add another video clip to 
play right after this clip, then you'd click 
on that little filmstrip icon to the right 
of Video Group 1 on the left side of the 
Timeline panel (it's shown circled here in 
red), and choose Add Media. In the Add 
Clips dialog, navigate to the next video 
clip, select it, and click Open. This adds 
that video clip right after your first clip 
(the clips play in order, from left to right 
in the Timeline panel). 





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: 






Step Three: 

If you want to load multiple clips at once, 
just Command-click (PC: Ctrl-click) on 
each one to select them in Mini Bridge, 
then Right-click on any one of them and, 
from the pop-up menu that appears, go 
under Photoshop, and choose Load Files 
into Photoshop Layers. That opens the 
files in Photoshop with each on its own 
layer. But if you look in the Timeline 
panel, you'll see that they're not appear- 
ing one after another (meaning one clip 
plays, then the next clips plays, and so on). 
Instead, they're stacked one on top of 
another (all the clips play at once, which is 
bad, since all you'll see is the top clip — 
it covers the rest). 



Step Four: 

Luckily, we can have Photoshop move 
them into a Video Group, which puts 
them one after another for us. Just se- 
lect all the clips in the Timeline panel 
(click on one, then Command-click [PC: 
Ctrl-click] on the rest). Then, click on 
the little filmstrip icon next to any track 
and, from the pop-up menu, choose 
New Video Group from Clips. That's 
it — Photoshop rearranges them so 
they're now one after another in the 
timeline, and the clips will play one after 
the other now, as well. If you look in 
the Layers panel, you'll see them inside 
what looks like a layer group. What's 
cool is that you can actually change the 
order your clips play in by changing the 
order of your layers in the Layers panel. 
The layer on the bottom plays first, then 
the layer above that plays right after it, 
and so on. 



Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



Chapter 12 



385 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Your Basic Controls for 
Working with Video 



The panel where almost everything video-related happens is called the Timeline 
panel. Most video editors are based on this same idea, because it's a very visual 
way to put together a movie. You build your movie from left to right, just like you 
would a slide show, where the first thumbnail is the first slide, then the one to the 
right of that is the second, and so on. Same thing with video, except, of course, 
that the thumbnails are videos. Take two minutes now to learn the Timeline panel 
and its basic controls, and it'll make your video editing life a lot easier. 



Step One: 

You play, rewind, and fast-forward your 
video in Photoshop just like you would in 
any other video player (using the standard 
Rewind [Go to Previous Frame], Play, and 
Fast-Forward [Go to Next Frame] icons). 
However, there is a "rewind to the begin- 
ning" icon (it's actually the Go to First 
Frame icon) that you'll wind up using 
quite a bit (it's the first icon, just to the left 
of Rewind). 



Step Two: 

Now, click on the down-facing arrow in 
the top right of the Timeline panel, and 
from the flyout menu, choose Enable 
Timeline Shortcut Keys to turn on your 
shortcuts for the panel. There's a great 
shortcut you can use to play your video: 
just hit the Spacebar on your keyboard. 
It starts (and then stops) your video. To 
jump to the beginning of the individual 
clip that is curently selected, press the 
Up Arrow key on your keyboard. To 
jump to the end of that clip, press the 
Down Arrow key. 

TIP: Put Your Playhead at Any Spot 

To move your playhead to any spot you 
want it in the timeline, just click once up 
at the top of the timeline, right on where 
the seconds are listed, and your playhead 
immediately jumps to that spot. 




The Go to First Frame icon takes you back to the very beginning 




Pressing the Up Arrow key jumps the playhead back to the beginning of the 
selected clip. The Down Arrow key jumps you to the end 



► 386 Chapter 12 Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



Z=E 




By default, the start of the work area is the start of your movie 




Drag the Start and End Work Area bars to change where your playhead starts 
and stops (so when you click Play, it will start 10 seconds into your movie, at 
the left bar, and stop 15 seconds in, at the right one) 



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To jump back 1 second in the timeline, press Shift-Up Arrow. To jump forward 
1 second, press Shift-Down Arrow 



Step Three: 

If you know you want your movie to be a 
specific length, like maybe 30 or 60 sec- 
onds for a commercial, or 90 seconds for 
a promo movie, you can keep from hav- 
ing to scroll back and forth down your 
timeline by setting up your work area to 
display just that amount of time from the 
very beginning. You do that by dragging 
the little Set Start of Work Area bar at the 
beginning of the timeline or the Set End 
of Work Area bar at the end of the time- 
line to the length you want your movie. 
That way, when your playhead hits the 
end of your work area (after playing for 
30 seconds), it stops (it doesn't just keep 
playing nothing). Also, if you want to work 
on just one part of a longer video, then 
you can drag the Set Start of Work Area 
bar to the beginning of that part, and 
then drag the Set End of Work Area bar 
to the end of that area. Now, when you 
click Play, it starts where you set the start 
of you work area and stops where you set 
the end. 



Step Four: 

There are some other shortcuts you 
might want to use once you really dig 
into this, but for now, I'd just concentrate 
on those ones I've given you here, be- 
cause they're the ones you'll use every 
time you make a movie. Just in case you 
need them, though, here are a few more: 
To jump back one frame, press the Left 
Arrow key. Add the Shift key to jump 
back 10 frames. Use the Right Arrow 
key to jump forward one frame; add the 
Shift key to jump 10 forward. To jump to 
the end of your timeline, press the End 
key on your keyboard. To jump back 
1 second in time, press Shift-Up Arrow 
key. To jump forward 1 second, press 
Shift- Down Arrow key. Again, you may 
not ever use these, but at least you know 
they're there. 

(Continued) 



Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop Chapter 12 387 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

There are some other important things 
you'll want to know about the Timeline 
panel: One is that you can change the 
size of the thumbnails in the Timeline 
panel by dragging the size slider at the 
bottom of the panel (it's shown circled 
here in red). Dragging to the left makes 
the thumbnails smaller; dragging to the 
right makes them larger. The advantage 
of choosing a smaller thumbnail size is 
that you'll see more of your movie in the 
timeline without scrolling (of course, it 
helps if you have the eyes of a 14-year- 
old, because if you're any older, you're 
probably going to need bifocals). 

TIP: Rearranging the Order of Clips 

There are two ways to change the order 
of how your clips play: (1) you can drag- 
and-drop the clips into the order you 
want right there in the timeline, or (2) you 
can change the order over in the Layers 
panel. They stack from bottom (being the 
first clip to play) to top, so just drag-and- 
drop the layers into the order you want 
the clips to play. 



Step Six: 

If you want to see a quick preview of any 
part of your video, you can just grab the 
playhead and, as you drag it right or left 
across your video, it plays a preview of 
the video that's below it (you don't hear 
any audio, you just see the video). This is 
called "scrubbing" in "Video Land" (they 
have a secret code name for everything). 
This is a huge time saver and you'll find 
yourself scrubbing over clips quite often. 




m 



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If you zoom out, you can fit the whole 01:40 movie in the timeline without 
having to scroll over to the right at all 











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If you zoom way in, now you're just seeing the first 7 seconds of your movie. 
This is handy when you've got a lot going on (like a bunch of very short clips 
close together with transitions) 




% 



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s 

i 



Here, I'm "scrubbing" across the first clip to see a preview of it, 
without clicking Play 



► 388 Chapter 12 Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 







Next Frame 
Previous Frame 


Split at Playhead 
Move & Trim 
Convert Frames 
Work Area 


► 






► 




Last Frame 


► 












Start of Work Area 
End of Work Area 


Keyframes 
Comments 












1 




► 


IIT, 




. 




Loop Playback 
Allow Frame Skipping 















Show ► 

I ^ Enable Timeline Shortcut Keys 
I y Enable Auto-Crouping of Clips 

Enable Onion Skins 

Onion Skin Settings... 

Set Timeline Frame Rate... 

Panel Options... 



Render Video.. 
Ctose 



uose 

Close 



Tab Croup 




Step Seven: 

You know that flyout menu at the top- 
right corner of the Timeline panel? If you 
ever can't remember the shortcut to do 
something, you can most likely do it there. 
Also, by default, Photoshop uses its regu- 
lar keyboard shortcuts for everything. For 
example, if you have the Move tool active, 
and you press the Up or Down Arrow key 
on your keyboard, it will move your clip 
up or down onscreen. However, if you 
turn on Enable Timeline Shortcut Keys, as 
we did in Step Two, then it uses the short- 
cuts I mentioned in that step. So, now the 
Up Arrow key jumps you to the beginning 
of the currently selected clip, and the 
Down Arrow key jumps you to the end of 
that clip. 



Step Eight: 

There's a little right-facing triangle at 
the end of each video clip and clicking 
on it brings up a settings dialog with 
more options for that clip. For example, 
you can set the Duration in the Video 
settings here. So, if the clip needed 
to be 4 minutes exactly, you could set 
it to 4 minutes exactly by dragging 
the slider or simply entering 4 min- 
utes in the Duration field. There's also 
a speed control here. If you click the 
music notes icon at the top, you'll get 
the Audio options for just this clip, in- 
cluding the overall volume for the clip's 
audio (or you can mute the audio), and 
you can set the audio Fade In and 
Fade Out points numerically. 



Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



Chapter 12 



389 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Editing (Trimming) 
Your Clips 



When we shoot digital photos, we wind up taking a lot of shots that nobody 
ever sees in our quest to find a "keeper." Same thing in video. We shoot a 
lot of footage where some parts at the beginning or end of our video (like us 
saying "Cut!" at the end of a clip) just need to be deleted. This cropping off of 
the beginning and/or end of our videos is called "trimming" (you trim off the 
parts that you don't want anyone to see), but we cover a bit more here than just 
this, so make sure you don't skip over it if you already know how to trim. 



Step One: 

Open clip 0020. mov to start a new movie, 
then click on the little filmstrip icon (to 
the right of Video Group 1), and choose 
Add Media from the pop-up menu, then 
choose clip 0008. mov, and it adds that 
clip right after the first one. Now, click 
the Play icon and you'll see that the 
first clip does the same "slide" (moving 
slowly from left to right) four times in this 
video clip. We only need one slide move 
from this angle for our movie, so we need 
to trim away the other parts of the video 
we don't need (we need to trim off a lot 
from the front and a little from the back, 
as the third time through the slide looked 
like the best one). All you have to do is 
click-and-hold directly on the beginning 
of the clip in the timeline and a little 
trimming preview window will pop up 
(as seen here). 



Step Two: 

As you drag to the right (this is called 
"scrubbing" in video world), the preview 
shows the slide, and then it being reset, 
and then sliding again. The good one 
starts right around the 15-second mark in 
the video, so keep dragging to the right 
until you get to that point, but stop drag- 
ging right before it starts to slide to the 
left. Now, just let go of your mouse but- 
ton and it trims off everything before that 
third slide. It shows the new start time of 
that clip as 15 seconds and 5 frames. 



Hi ,,.;!,.. ■, . . .,,■ | ;...; . 





► 390 Chapter 12 Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



: 





Step Three: 

Next, let's do the same thing to the end 
of the clip and trim away the fourth slide 
(so all you'll see in this clip is that third 
slide — the one we want to keep). Scroll 
sideways down the timeline until you see 
the end of our first clip. Click-and-hold di- 
rectly on the end of the clip (that preview 
window pops up again), and drag to the 
left while you keep an eye on that preview 
window. Keep dragging to about the 5:03 
end mark (look up in the top-left corner 
of the preview window and it shows you 
the time in seconds and frames, so stop 
around 5 seconds and 3 frames, as shown 
here). You've now trimmed off everything 
past the third slide, and your original 
28-second video is down to about a 
5-second clip overall. 



Step Four: 

Now, what about that second clip we 
added that appears immediately after 
the clip we just trimmed? Won't there 
be a big gap of nothing between the 
two clips? Nope. Photoshop automati- 
cally moves that clip over for you, so 
there are no gaps in your movie. Pretty 
sweet, eh? Here, you can see your two 
clips, which, even after trimming, are still 
back-to-back. If you look up at the top of 
the timeline, you'll see that the first clip is 
now only around 5 seconds of your movie, 
and the second clip starts immediately 
after it. Also, don't worry, even though 
you trimmed that video away, you can 
always bring it right back the same way 
you trimmed it — just click on either end 
and drag it out (so it's really more like it's 
hidden, than trimmed, but again, in the 
world of video, its referred to as "trim- 
ming"). Okay, that's all there is to it. 



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Working with 

Audio and 

Background Music 



There are three types of audio you'll wind up dealing with in your movies: 
(1) there's audio in the video you captured with your camera, and you get to decide 
whether your audience will hear that or not, (2) you can add a background music 
track behind your video, and (3) you can add additional audio tracks for things 
like narration or sound effects. Luckily, managing these is fairly easy. 



Step One: 

We'll pick up with the two clips we 
used in the previous trimming project. 
If you look in the Timeline panel, directly 
below your movie clips, you'll see an 
empty track right below it (and it says 
Audio Track to the left of it, below 
Video Group 1). That's where your audio 
(background music or narration tracks) 
goes. To add an audio track, click directly 
on the little music notes icon and, from 
the pop-up menu that appears, choose 
Add Audio (as shown here). 



Step Two: 

Find the audio track you want to use as 
your background music (Photoshop sup- 
ports most common audio file formats, 
from AAC to MP3). You can go to the 
book's download page and download 
the track I used, which is a royalty-free 
background music track from iStockphoto 
(they have lots of great background music 
tracks you can buy and use in your pro- 
jects. They were gracious enough to let 
me use this one and share it with you to 
practice along with. This track was actually 
featured as their "Free Track of the Day" 
the day I needed a background track, and 
it worked perfectly for this project. Total 
luck). Anyway, once you select your audio 
file and click Open, it adds your back- 
ground music to the timeline, where it 
appears in green so you know instantly 
it's audio (video clips appear in blue). 







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► 392 Chapter 12 Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



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Step Three: 

Click the Play icon (or just press the 
Spacebar) to play our short video, and 
now the background music plays, as well. 
Makes a huge difference, doesn't it? At 
the end of this chapter, we're going to 
build a 60-second-or-so demo video, so 
just like the video clip, trim the music 
down to around 60 seconds. But, our 
music clip is 236 seconds long (almost 
4 minutes), so it's going to cut off really 
abruptly at the end of our video, unless 
we gently fade the music out. So, Right- 
click directly on your green audio track 
and an Audio settings dialog appears, 
where you can choose when you want 
the music to fade in (since we're starting 
at the beginning of the song, we don't 
need to fade in, but if we started later in 
the song, we would want it to) and fade 
out. Drag the Fade Out slider over to 
around the 60-second mark (as shown 
here) and click anywhere outside the dia- 
log to close it. Now, play your movie again 
and, at the 60-second mark, your music 
will gently fade away. 

TIP: Muting Your Background Music 

If you want to temporarily turn off your 
background music track, just click the 
little speaker icon (shown circled here) 
to the left of the music notes icon, and 
it mutes your background track. 

Step Four: 

When you played the video clip in Step 
Three, did you hear people talking in the 
background? That's me and my team talk- 
ing and directing during the shoot. Of 
course, you don't want to hear that in this 
case — you just want to hear the back- 
ground music — so you need to mute the 
audio on the video clip. Right-click on 
your first video clip and a settings dialog 
appears (shown here). Click on the music 
notes icon to see the Audio settings, then 
turn on the Mute Audio checkbox (as 
shown here), so you don't hear us talking 
while we were taping. 

(Continued) 



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Chapter 12 



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Step Five: 

Besides your background music track, 
you can add a narration track (or a voice- 
over track), or even sound effects (maybe 
a car revving its engine?). To add another 
audio track, click on the music notes icon 
again (to the left of your existing music 
track), and choose New Audio Track 
(as shown here at top). This adds a blank 
audio track below your background music 
track, and it will be empty until you go 
back under that same pop-up menu and 
choose Add Audio, then find a narration 
or voice-over track to add. Here, I chose a 
voice-over track, and you'll see it appear 
in the new audio track right below the 
background track (seen here in the cen- 
ter). If you were to click the Play icon right 
now, our background music would start, 
but our voice-over would start immedi- 
ately, as well. If you want your voice-over 
to start a little later (maybe after a few 
seconds of background music), just click- 
and-drag the voice-over clip to the right 
(don't try to trim it, you want to move the 
whole clip), until you get to the point in 
time you want it to start (at the bottom 
here, you can see I dragged it over so it 
will start around the 7-second mark). 



Step Six: 

If you are going to have a voice-over 
track, you'll probably want the volume 
of the music to lower once the talking 
starts (this is called "ducking" in the 
video world). To do that, click on the 
background music track, then click-and- 
drag your playhead over to a second or 
so before the point where your voice- 
over starts. Now, click on the Split at 
Playhead icon (it looks like a pair of scis- 
sors and is circled in red here) to split 
your background music into two sec- 
tions. Then, Right-click on this second 
section and, in the Audio settings dialog, 
you can lower the volume from 100% 
(full volume) to maybe 50% or 60% (as 
shown here). 



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Step Seven: 

Of course, at some point your voice- 
over will end, and you'll probably want 
the background music to return to full 
volume. You pretty much do the same 
thing. Just scroll down the timeline to 
the point where you can see your voice- 
over ends and move your playhead to 
a second or two after that point. Click 
on the track you want to split (your back- 
ground music track), then click the Split 
at Playhead icon again to create a third 
section of your background music track. 
Right-click on this third section and set 
your volume back to 100% (as shown here). 



Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



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Adding Transitions 

Between Clips and 

Fade Ins/Fade Outs 



When you make a movie, you get to decide how your movie starts and ends. 
For example, at the end of the movie, does it just abruptly stop, or does it smoothly 
fade away to black? Same thing for the opening. Does it just start immediately when 
you click Play, or fade in from white or black? You also get to decide how your clips 
transition from clip to clip — a quick cut, or does it smoothly dissolve from one clip 
to the next? Of course, it depends on the type of movie you're creating, but adding 
these transitions can help give your movie a more polished look. 



Step One: 

Here are same two video clips again, 
and if you click the Play icon (or press the 
Spacebar), the first clip plays and then 
when it's done, the second clip plays im- 
mediately — it just cuts from one clip to 
the other. To add a nice fade between 
the two, click on the Transition icon (it 
looks like a square with a diagonal line), 
and the Drag to Apply dialog, with your 
transition choices, appears (seen here). 
The top one, Fade, doesn't work very well 
between two clips like this (it fades out 
at the end of the first clip, then fades in 
the second clip). 

Step Two: 

Instead, you'd probably choose a Cross 
Fade, which fades directly from one clip 
into the next (kind of like a dissolve in a 
slide show). To add a cross fade between 
your clips, first click on Cross Fade in the 
dialog, and then you get to choose how 
long you want this cross fade to take. 
The default choice is 1 second, but you 
can choose longer if you'd like by click- 
ing on the Duration slider (I chose 1.15 
seconds here). Now, just click-and-drag 
that cross fade down onto your time- 
line and position it between your two 
clips (as shown here), and then let go of 
your mouse button. It adds a little blue 
rectangle with two triangles (as seen in 
the next step) letting you know there's 
a transition added there. To remove a 
transition, click on that little rectangle 
and hit the Delete (PC: Backspace) key 
on your keyboard. 





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Step Three: 

Of the other choices here, I usually use 
Fade with Black, which is a great way to 
start your movie, because it starts with 
a black screen and then fades into your 
first video clip. However, the default 
1-second duration always seems too 
short and abrupt to me (for the start of 
a video anyway), so I generally increase 
the duration to 2 seconds. To add this 
Fade with Black transition to the begin- 
ning of your movie, just click-and-drag it 
down to the beginning of your video clip 
and let go of the mouse button. It adds 
a little blue rectangle with a diagonal 
line letting you know there's a transition 
added there. 



Tip: Editing Transitions 

If you want to make any changes to 
a transition, just Right-click on it and 
you can make those changes in the 
Transition settings that pops up. 



Step Four: 

So, if you know what Fade with Black 
does, you can probably imagine what 
Fade with White does. If you choose 
Fade with Color, a little color swatch 
will appear in the bottom-right corner 
of the dialog (shown here at bottom 
right). Click on the color swatch and 
Photoshop's standard Color Picker ap- 
pears for you to choose a solid color to 
fade to. At the end of your video, you're 
probably going to want to Fade with 
Black (dramatic ending, right?) and you 
do this the same way as adding any 
transition. Scroll down the timeline to 
the very end of your movie and then 
click the Transition icon to bring up the 
Drag to Apply dialog. Now, drag the 
Fade with Black transition and drop it 
on the end of your video clip. It adds 
a little "fade out" rectangle to let you 
know it's there. That's it. 



Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



Chapter 12 



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The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Creating Lower Thirds 
(or Adding Logos) 



If you're doing an interview as your movie, it's pretty common to have the person's 
name appear in the bottom third of the frame, usually within a rectangle or graphic 
bar of some kind (called a "lower third" in video world). The trick is to have the 
background behind your graphic bar appear transparent, so it doesn't cover your 
video with a solid white background. They're easy to create in Photoshop and then 
take directly over to your timeline. Plus, the same technique we use for lower thirds, 
you can use for bringing logos or other graphics into your timeline. 



Step One: 

Start by creating a regular ol' new docu- 
ment in Photoshop (go under the File 
menu and choose New). You want to 
make this pretty close to the dimensions 
of the movie you're creating, so from the 
Preset pop-up menu, choose Film & 
Video, and then choose a Size that is 
closest to the size of what you're editing 
(in this case, we're editing 1080p HD 
video, so I choose the HDV 1080p/29.97 
preset, as shown here), then click OK to 
create a new blank Photoshop document. 

Step Two: 

Go to the Layers panel, click on the 
Create a New Layer icon to create 
a new blank layer, and then get the 
Rectangular Marquee tool (M) and 
drag out a long, thin horizontal selec- 
tion like the one you see here (this 
will be our simple lower third shape). 
Press D to set your Foreground color 
to black, and then fill your selected 
area with black by pressing Option- 
Delete (PC: Alt-Backspace). Now, 
while your selection is still in place, 
click on the Create New Adjustment 
Layer icon at the bottom of the Layers 
panel, and choose Gradient from the 
pop-up menu (as shown here). When 
the Gradient Fill dialog appears, click 
on the little downward-facing triangle 
to the right of the Gradient thumb- 
nail, and in the Gradient Picker, click 
on the little gear icon, and choose 
Pastels. Click Append in the dialog 
that appears. 



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► 398 Chapter 12 Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



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Step Three: 

Once they're loaded, choose the Yellow, 
Green, Blue gradient (seen here), and 
then change the Angle to 0°, so the gra- 
dient is applied sideways (rather than top 
to bottom). Once it looks like the one you 
see here, press Command-E (PC: Ctrl-E) 
to merge the Gradient adjustment layer 
with the black bar layer to make it just one 
gradient bar layer. Now, we can't just save 
the file at this point, because we have a 
solid white Background layer, and that's 
exactly how this file would appear on our 
timeline — as a big white box with a gradi- 
ent bar on it. So, what you need to do is 
simply drag your Background layer onto 
the Trash icon at the bottom of the panel. 
Now, you just have that gradient bar all 
by itself with a transparent background 
(as seen in the Layers panel at bottom 
right), which is exactly what we want in our 
video (so just the bar sits over our video). 



Step Four: 

Arrange the two windows (your gradient 
bar and video clip windows) so you can 
see them both onscreen at the same 
time (try going under the Window menu, 
under Arrange, and choosing Tile All 
Vertically), get the Move tool (V), click 
on the gradient bar layer, and then just 
drag-and-drop it right onto your video. 
Now, you'll see the gradient bar with a 
transparent background in your Layers 
panel (which is exactly what we want), 
but it's not in the place where we want 
it. By default, it adds it at the end of the 
video clip, like it was another clip or still 
(it appears in purple though, because it's 
a still). We need it to appear "over" the 
video clip. 

(Continued) 



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Chapter 12 



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Step Five: 

What we need to do is get that gradient 
bar outside our Video Group 1 , so it can 
appear over our video clip (not after it). 
To do this, click-and-drag the gradient bar 
layer straight up to the very top of the 
layer stack in the Layers panel — right 
outside Video Group 1). The trick to 
making this work is to move it up top until 
you see a thin white horizontal line appear. 
That's your cue to let go of the mouse 
button, and then it appears outside the 
group (as seen in the Layers panel here). 
Here's the "Gotcha!" You still can't see 
your gradient bar. That's because, al- 
though it's now on its own graphics track 
in the Timeline panel (above your video), 
it starts after the end of your clip. So, 
click on the gradient bar in the timeline, 
and drag it to the left so it appears over 
the video (as shown here at the bottom). 
Now (finally), you can see your gradient 
bar. Switch to the Move tool to reposi- 
tion your bar wherever you'd like it. 



Step Six: 

If you want your lower third to fade 
in, click on the Transition icon (shown 
circled here in red), and in the Drag to 
Apply dialog, click on Fade, choose 
a nice long Duration (like around V/2 
seconds), and then click-and-drag the 
Fade transition and drop it on the be- 
ginning of your gradient bar in the time- 
line (as shown here). Now when the 
playhead reaches your gradient, it will 
fade it in over V/2 seconds. We're al- 
most done. 



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► 400 Chapter 12 Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



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Step Seven: 

You can add layer styles to your proj- 
ect, as well. In this case, let's add a Drop 
Shadow layer style to our gradient bar 
(so it casts a shadow back onto our video, 
which helps add depth and adds to the 
impression that our bar is "floating above" 
our video). To do this, make sure your 
playhead is over the gradient bar in 
the timeline, so you can see it onscreen, 
then click on the Add a Layer Style icon 
at the bottom of the Layers panel, and 
choose Drop Shadow (as shown here). 
When the dialog comes up, you can 
change the softness of the shadow by 
dragging the Size slider to the right (as 
shown here). Also, you can change the po- 
sition of the shadow by moving your cur- 
sor outside the dialog — right onto your 
image itself — and just dragging it where 
you want it. When you're done, click OK, 
and now you've created extra depth. 



Step Eight: 

Now let's finish off our Lower Third proj- 
ect. Get the Type tool (T), click right on 
your lower third in your image window, 
and simply enter your text (as shown 
here, where I added some text in the 
font Myriad Pro Semibold Italic). You can 
switch to the Move tool and reposition 
this text just like you would with a text 
layer on a photo. Once again, take a look 
at the stacking order over in the Layers 
panel: the Type layer is on top, which 
means the type appears over the gradient 
bar, then you see the gradient bar next 
(it's over the video), and then the video 
clip itself. By the way, we didn't have to 
drag the Type layer up to the top, since 
we were already working outside Video 
Group 1. Finally, like I mentioned in the 
intro, you can use this same technique to 
add logos or other graphics to your video. 



Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



Chapter 12 



401 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Applying 
Photoshop Filters 
and Adjustments 



This is one of my favorite features: the ability to apply Photoshop 
adjustments (everything from Curves to Levels and a whole lot more) 
and regular Photoshop filters. There are just a few little things you 
need to know so it works the way you want it to. 



Step One: 

Let's start a new movie (just so we don't 
get totally sick of seeing one video clip 
again and again). Go to Mini Bridge and 
double-click on the file named "0037 
.mov," which is the full car in front of the 
1950s gas station, to open it. Of course, 
it needs some trimming, so you can do 
that now if you'd like, but when you're 
done, go to the Layers panel, click on 
the Create New Adjustment Layer icon, 
and from the pop-up menu, you can 
choose any of the regular adjustment 
layers we'd use for digital photos (in 
this case, just choose Black & White, 
as shown here). 



Step Two: 

When you choose this, your clip in- 
stantly becomes black and white (as 
seen here), and if you look in the Prop- 
erties panel, you'll see all the regular 
Black & White sliders (I'm not a big fan 
of this adjustment layer for doing black- 
and-white conversions for photos, but 
just for this example, I don't think it'll 
hurt anybody). ;-) One thing to note: 
look in the Layers panel — it automati- 
cally groups this adjustment layer with 
just this one video clip. That's really 
helpful, because we just want to affect 
only this clip (not all our clips). 



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► 402 Chapter 12 Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



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for Digital Photographer: 



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Step Three: 

Here's something to keep in mind: 
these adjustment layers aren't just 
"one-click video effects"; you added 
a regular Photoshop adjustment layer. 
So, now think like you would if you were 
adjusting a digital camera photo, and 
do the same type of things (like, here, 
I lowered the amount of red to darken 
the windows of the garage, and then 
increased the greens to make the gas 
pumps brighter, just like I would on a 
still, but it's applied to the entire video. 
This is what is so darn powerful about 
having video in Photoshop like this. We 
can take the stuff we already know in 
Photoshop and apply it to video without 
having to learn a whole new program. 
That, I love! 



Step Four: 

To further illustrate this, let's add another 
adjustment layer. Click on the Create New 
Adjustment Layer icon again, but this 
time choose Curves. Now you can ad- 
just the curve any way you'd like (or in this 
case, we want to add lots of contrast, so 
just choose Strong Contrast from the 
Preset pop-up menu — it's shown circled 
in red here). Notice that it's automati- 
cally grouped with your video clip, as well. 
Seriously, this is pretty darn amazing that 
we can treat moving video just like it was 
a still photo (can you tell I am just so dig- 
ging this?). Okay, now let's take it up a 
notch and leverage this for video. 

(Continued) 



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Chapter 12 



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Step Five: 

Go to the Layers panel and delete those 
two adjustment layers, because now we're 
going to look at how to apply Photoshop 
filters to your video. First, go up under the 
Filter menu, under Sharpen, and choose 
Unsharp Mask. When the dialog appears, 
we're going to add some really heavy 
sharpening — try Amount: 135, Radius: 1.5, 
and Threshold: 3, and click OK. Now, click 
the Play icon to see how your video clip 
looks all sharpened. You're probably won- 
dering why you could see the sharpening 
onscreen for a moment, but then as soon 
as it started playing, the sharpening was 
gone. That's because you can't just apply 
a filter directly to a clip — it will only apply 
it to the first frame (which is why you saw 
it for a split-second, and then it was gone). 
You have to do one extra step, so the filter 
is applied to the entire clip. 



Step Six: 

Press Command-Option-Z (PC: Ctrl- 
Alt-Z) a couple of times until the sharp- 
ening is removed from that first frame. 
Now, to apply a filter to the entire clip 
at once, you'll need to first convert this 
clip into a smart object layer. Go under 
the Filter menu and choose Convert 
for Smart Filters (as shown here), and 
a little tiny page icon will appear in 
the bottom-right corner of your clip's 
thumbnail in the Layers panel, letting 
you know it's now a smart object. Then, 
go back to the Unsharp Mask filter, 
apply those same settings, and click OK. 
{Note: Applying a smart filter turns your 
video clip's bar purple in the timeline, as if 
it were a still image.) Now when you click 
the Play icon, the sharpening appears 
throughout the entire clip. But, there's a 
decent chance on that playback you ran 
into a problem. 




Layer Type Select 



3D View Window 




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a 





Step Seven: 

So, chances are somewhat likely that 
when you played that clip it either was a 
bit jittery, or it played for a few seconds 
and then the playhead literally stopped. 
That's because the clip hadn't fully ren- 
dered a preview yet (this is a phenom- 
enon video people deal with all the time, 
but as photographers we're like, "Huh?" 
because we're used to everything hap- 
pening in real time). When you apply 
an effect like a filter, it takes some time 
(and a lot of your computer's RAM) to 
apply that sharpening to 24 frames every 
second. So, how do you know if your 
video has rendered and will play without 
being choppy? You'll see a thin, solid 
green bar directly above your video clip 
in the Timeline panel (as shown here at 
the bottom). If, instead, you see a bro- 
ken green line, or just some green dots 
(as shown here at the top), that means it 
hasn't fully rendered, so your preview will 
be choppy at best. Now, on to the fix. 



Step Eight: 

I learned this fix from my buddy 
Richard Harrington (author of the book, 
Photoshop for Video, by Peachpit Press), 
and it works great. First, turn off the 
master audio (click that little icon that 
looks like a speaker, shown circled here 
in red) and then play the clip one time 
through. For whatever reason, that forces 
the preview to build, and with the audio 
turned off, you'll actually see the thin 
green solid bar appear as your playhead 
moves through the clip. Note: I noticed 
that if I applied a filter that does some se- 
rious math, like the new Oil Paint filter, 
I had to let it run through more than 
once with the audio off before the pre- 
view would fully render. Just a heads up 
on that. 



Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



Chapter 12 



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for Digital Photographers 



Titles and 
Working with Text 



There are two ways to work with text in your video project: one is to create your text 
in a separate Photoshop document (as if you were creating a slide for a slide show), 
and then bring that into your project, or you can just add your text directly into your 
video project, and here you'll learn both (and a couple of tips along the way). 



Step One: 

The nice thing about adding text to your 
videos in Photoshop is that you get to use 
all the regular type controls. But, before 
we start adding type to our video, if you're 
primarily going to do title slides (an open- 
ing slide or a closing slide), you might 
want to consider just building those sepa- 
rately in Photoshop and then dragging 
them into your video timeline. To do that, 
go under the File menu, choose New, 
and then from the Preset pop-up menu, 
choose Film & Video. That gives you a 
bunch of preset video sizes in the Size pop- 
up menu. Choose the one that matches 
the video you're going to be working with 
(in my case, it was HDV 1080p/29.97). This 
creates a new document, which you can 
treat just like a photo (add backgrounds, 
text, and so on). 

Step Two: 

If you want to use a photo as your back- 
ground, just open the photo and, using 
the Move tool (V), click-and-drag it onto 
your HD-sized document. Then, press 
Command-T (PC: Ctrl-T) to bring up Free 
Transform. Press-and-hold the Shift key to 
keep things proportional, and click-and- 
drag a corner point to resize your photo so 
it fits (as best it can) within this wide-screen 
document. Now, get the Type tool (T), click 
on your image, and type in your text (it's 
best to keep your text inside those guides. 
The area inside those guides is safe for put- 
ting text without it clipping off if you were 
to broadcast this video on television. Hey, 
it could happen). 






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► 406 Chapter 12 Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



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■ 




t 






Step Three: 

Once you've created your title slide the 
way you want it, go ahead and flatten 
the file (click on the down-facing arrow 
in the top right of the Layers panel, and 
choose Flatten Image), and then it's 
decision time. You can either: (a) save the 
file, and then, in the Timeline panel, click 
on the filmstrip icon and choose Add 
Media to add this slide to your timeline, 
or (b) drag-and-drop it right onto your 
timeline. To drag-and-drop it, you'll 
need to be able to see both your slide 
document and your video document, 
so go under the Window menu, under 
Arrange, and choose Tile All Vertically 
to put both windows side-by-side (as 
seen here). 

Step Four: 

Then, get the Move tool again, press-and- 
hold the Shift key (so everything lines up 
perfectly), click on your flattened title 
slide (it's the window on the right in the 
previous step), and drag that image over 
onto your video clip (you should see a 
faint outline of your document as you 
drag. If you don't see it, hold the cursor 
down a little longer on the slide before 
you drag). Because you held the Shift 
key, the title slide fits perfectly onscreen 
(otherwise, you'd have to reposition it to 
fit onscreen afterward). This adds your 
title slide to your timeline, after the video 
clip (as seen here at top). To make it ap- 
pear as the opening slide instead, just go 
to the Layers panel, click on that layer (the 
top layer), and drag it below your video 
clip layer (as seen at bottom here). Now, 
your title slide is the first thing in your 
timeline and will appear first when you 
play your movie. 



(Continued) 



Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop Chapter 12 407 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

Besides creating your title slides sepa- 
rately in Photoshop, you can add text 
over any still or video clip in your movie. 
However, if you just get the Type tool, and 
with your video layer active in the Layers 
panel, click on your video and start typing, 
it assumes you want to add this text to 
the end of your movie (here, I typed the 
word "passion," and it added a Type 
frame to the end of my movie, as seen 
in the timeline). What we actually want is 
for this text to appear on top of (over) our 
video clip, rather than after it. We're going 
to fix that in just a moment, but before 
we do, take a look at the Layers panel 
and notice that our title slide is at the bot- 
tom (which makes it play first), then our 
movie clip is right above that (meaning it 
plays second), and then our Type layer 
is above that, meaning it plays after the 
movie clip. Okay, now we can go fix it. 



Step Six: 

If your layers are all in the same Video 
Group (like a layer group when you're 
working on still images), each layer plays 
one after another. However, if you want 
something to appear over part of your 
video track, you have to move it outside 
that Video Group, so it's on its own sepa- 
rate track. So, go to the Layers panel, 
click-and-drag that Type layer up toward 
the top of the layer stack (above Video 
Group 1), and you'll see a white horizontal 
line appear. When you see that, let go of 
the mouse button, and your layer moves 
outside the group, and above it (as seen 
here), and your type now appears in its 
own track above your main video track 
in the Timeline panel. Now, click on that 
Type clip in the timeline, and drag it to the 
left, so it appears over the video clip, and 
now you can see the type appear over 
your video (as seen here). 




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► 408 Chapter 12 Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



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Step Seven: 

Before we move on, one thing to keep 
in mind is if you're not seeing your text 
(but you can see that it's at the top of 
the Layers panel, outside your group), 
that's probably because you need to 
move your playhead over the part of 
your movie where the text appears. 
Okay, now that your text is in place, you 
can move it anywhere you want over 
the video by simply dragging it with the 
Move tool. If you want to change the 
color of your text, you'd do it the same 
way you do any other time: double-click 
directly on the little "J" thumbnail in 
the Layers panel (that's a shortcut to 
select all the text on the layer), then go 
to the Options Bar and click on the color 
swatch, which brings up the Color Picker, 
where you choose a new color and click 
OK. Besides the controls in the Options 
Bar, other Type controls are found in the 
Character panel (go under the Window 
menu and choose Character). 



Step Eight: 

While we're here, let's try a few more 
type techniques. Press Command-J (PC: 

Ctrl-J) to duplicate your Type layer. Press 
Command-T (PC: Ctrl-T) to bring up Free 
Transform, press-and-hold the Shift key, 
grab a corner point, and drag the text on 
this duplicate layer out so it fills the entire 
image area from side to side (as seen here), 
then position it near the top of the video. 
Because you can pretty much do the 
same stuff to a video that you can do 
to a still image, you can do things like 
changing the blend mode of the Type 
layer (go ahead and change it to Soft 
Light, so it blends in with the video), and 
lowering the layer's Opacity (lower it to 
80%, as seen here). Lastly, drag this Type 
clip a little further to the right in the 
timeline, so the smaller word "Passion" 
appears first, then the larger one. 

(Continued) 



Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



Chapter 12 



409 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Nine: 

If you want the larger type to fade in 
(rather than just appearing abruptly), 
Click on the Transition icon, and in the 
Drag to Apply dialog (seen here), click 
on Fade, and then drag-and-drop it 
right at the beginning of your duplicate 
Type clip (as shown here), and now it 
will smoothly fade in. Okay, you ready 
to take it up a notch? Let's do some 
type animation. 



Step 10: 

In the Layers panel, click on the smaller 
Type layer, then go to the Timeline panel 
and click on the little right-facing arrow 
to the left of the word "Passion" on the 
far left to reveal the animation controls 
(shown here). Move your playhead just 
past the beginning of where your type ap- 
pears, then click on the Enable Keyframe 
Animation control to the left of Text Warp 
(as shown here) and it adds a diamond 
icon to your timeline (shown circled here 
in red), which marks the spot at which 
your text warp animation will start. Now, 
drag your playhead over to where you 
want it to stop and just leave it there for 
now. Double-click on your Type layer's 
thumbnail in the Layers panel to select 
your text, then go up to the Options Bar, 
and click on the Create Warped Text 
icon (also shown circled here). When the 
Warp Text dialog appears, choose any 
Style you like (I chose Arch), change the 
Bend amount (I chose +26), and click OK. 
Go back to the Timeline panel, to the 
Text Warp animation control, click the 
diamond icon (to the left of Text Warp) 
to mark the end of your animation (as 
shown here at the bottom), and you're 
done. Now when you click the Play icon, 
your text will be regular text when it first 
appears, and then it will animate a bend- 
ing move into arched text. 




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► 41 Chapter 12 Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



Besides adding the standard stuff in the Adjustments panel, we can also add 

overlays and different texture effects using layer blend modes, just like we 

would to a still image in Photoshop, but as always, there are a few little things 

to know about how these are handled when adding them over video. 



Using Blend Modes 
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Step One: 

Open the video you want to apply a 
blend mode look to. I downloaded a lace 
texture for this from iStockphoto (they've 
got loads of these — just search for "wed- 
ding," then choose the Illustrations filter 
at the right end of the Search field, so 
it doesn't show photos, just illustrations. 
The pattern we're using here, which you 
can see in the next step, in high resolu- 
tion, costs $8). Now, go under the File 
menu and choose Place (this will let us 
open the pattern and scale it to the size 
we want it). 

Step Two: 

Navigate to the pattern file, click on it, 
and then click Place. When your illustra- 
tion appears, it will appear as a box with 
a big X in it. Press-and-hold the Shift key, 
grab one of the corner points, and resize 
it so it fills the entire image area, then 
press the Return (PC: Enter) key to lock 
in your resizing. You're probably wonder- 
ing why you're seeing the pattern ap- 
pear in the Layers panel, but you don't 
see it in your image window, right? That's 
because, by default, it adds the new 
file to the end of your video. To change 
that, go to the Layers panel, click on the 
pattern layer, and drag it out of Video 
Group 1, up to the very top of the layer 
stack, and then release the mouse button. 
This puts the pattern on its own track in 
the Timeline panel, but now you'll need 
to click on it there and slide it over to 
the left, until it's directly above your video 
clip, and now you'll be able to see it. 

(Continued) 



Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



Chapter 12 



411 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Three: 

Now, change the blend mode of this 
layer to Overlay, and you can see how, 
by just changing the blend mode, the 
pattern is now blending with our bride 
video. Unfortunately, it's covering her 
face, and that's generally not what we're 
going for. So, we'll do three quick things 
to fix this: (1) Add a layer mask to this pat- 
tern layer by clicking on the Add Layer 
Mask icon at the bottom of the Layers 
panel (it's the third icon from the left). 

(2) Get the Rectangular Marquee tool (M), 
and drag out a selection over your bride's 
face. Make it very loose, so if your bride 
moves a bit in the video, you won't see 
the texture appear over her face. And, 

(3) you're going to need to really soften 
the edges of this selection, so there's a 
smooth blend between the texture and 
the bride. You do this by going under the 
Select menu, under Modify, and choosing 
Feather. Enter 200 pixels and click OK. 



Step Four: 

Press D, then X, to set your Foreground 
color to black, then press Option-Delete 
(PC: Alt-Backspace) to fill your selection 
with black. Since you're on the layer mask 
on this layer, it masks away that area over 
the bride's face, and leaves the pattern 
everywhere but her face (as seen here). 
Now, you can try out different blend 
modes by pressing Shift-+ (plus sign) 
and just stop at the one that looks best to 
you. In this case, I liked Soft Light, but also 
try Hard Light, and lower the Opacity to 
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► 41 2 Chapter 12 Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



Before you jump into this start-to-finish project, you really need 

to have already read the rest of this chapter, because I'm not going 

to explain in-depth the stuff already covered in this chapter — I'm just 

going to tell you what to do. This is a great way to take what you've 

learned in this chapter and put it to use (plus, this is where everything 

you've learned so far comes together). So, if you've read the rest of 

this chapter, you've probably already gone to the downloads page and 

downloaded these same video clips and photos, so let's get to work. 



Our Start-to- 
Finish Project 




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Replace Footage. 
Delete Track 




Step One: 

Go to Mini Bridge and select the video 
clips you want to use in your movie (you 
can see the ones I used here in the Layers 
panel in the next step). Then Right-click 
on any of those selected clips, and from 
the pop-up menu that appears, go under 
Photoshop, and choose Load Files into 
Photoshop Layers. In just a minute or 
so, you'll see your clips, each appear- 
ing on its own layer in the Layers panel 
(they'll have a little filmstrip icon in the 
lower-right corner of the thumbnail). 

Step Two: 

Of course, these videos are stacked 
one on top of another, and we need them 
to appear in our timeline one right after 
another instead. So, select all your clips 
(either in the Layers panel, or in the 
Timeline panel, whichever you prefer) by 
Command-clicking (PC: Ctrl-clicking) on 
them, then click on the filmstrip icon to 
the left of any of your selected clips in 
the Timeline panel and, from the pop-up 
menu, choose New Video Group from 
Clips. Photoshop then rearranges the 
selected clips so they appear one after 
another. By the way, our movie is going to 
be 60 seconds long, so if you want, you 
can move your Set End of Work Area bar 
to the 60-second mark, just to save you 
some time (see page 370 for more on 
your Work Area). 



(Continued) 



Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop Chapter 12 413 i 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Three: 

Let's go ahead and make the clip of the 
back of the car our opening clip, so go to 
the Layers panel and drag this clip down 
in the layer stack, so it's the bottommost 
layer (as shown here). Now, let's trim the 
clip (the first couple of slide moves aren't 
that good, so we'll go with the third one): 
trim the front (as seen here) and the back 
to get it so it's just that one slide move 
from left to right. Trim it so the clip stops 
just a second after the slide move ends 
(see page 390 for more on trimming). 
Note: If you have trouble trimming the 
end of the clip so there's no movement 
back toward the left (I sure did), this 
is where zooming in on your timeline 
(using the slider at the bottom left of 
the timeline) really pays off (I zoomed 
in tight, then it was a breeze getting 
to just the right spot, because the blue 
clip got a lot longer, which makes it easier 
to trim). 



Step Four: 

Let's make the car hood unfocused-to- 
focused shot the second clip, so in the 
Layers panel, drag that clip down in the 
stack so it's the second layer. We'll need 
to trim this one a bit to get just the sec- 
ond unfocused-to-focused move, and 
make sure the end cuts off right after 
it's in focus for just a second. Go ahead 
and play the first two clips and see how 
it looks. Looks like it needs a transition 
between those two clips, right? Click 
on the Transition icon at the top left of 
the Timeline panel, and choose Cross 
Fade. Choose a short Duration (like 0.75 
seconds), and then click on Cross Fade 
and drag-and-drop it right over the spot 
where the first and second clips meet in 
the timeline (as shown here) to make it 
dissolve between the two (see page 396 
for more on transitions). 



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► 414 Chapter 12 Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 





Step Five: 

Technically, things go faster in the edit- 
ing process if you wait until the end to 
add things like transitions and Photoshop 
adjustments and effects, so usually you'd 
put all your clips in order first, and then 
go back and add all these little enhance- 
ments, but since this movie is so short, 
I thought we could bend the rules a bit 
here. Okay, let's choose our third clip, and 
move it to the third position from the bot- 
tom in our Layers panel (let's use the wide 
shot). Go ahead and trim the front and 
back of that clip, so you just see the slide 
move, and cut it a second or so after the 
move. Now, let's add a digital photo to 
our movie, so click on the filmstrip icon 
to the right of Video Group 1 in the Time- 
line panel, and choose Add Media (as 
shown here), navigate to the image, and 
click Open. 



Step Six: 

Your photo appears at the end of your 
video, but we want it after our third video 
clip, so in the Layers panel, click-and-drag 
it downward in the stack so it's the fourth 
layer (as seen here). You can see it now in 
the timeline after the third clip (photos 
appear in purple on the timeline). The 
photo is fairly large in size (dimension- 
wise), so we'll have to scale it down to 
fit onscreen, and we can do that using 
the same thing we use to scale down 
any image on a layer in Photoshop: Free 
Transform. Press Command-T (PC: Ctrl-T), 
but when the Free Transform handles 
appear, the image is so large you won't 
be able to reach them. So, press Com- 
mand-0 (zero; PC: Ctrl-O) and the docu- 
ment window will resize so you can reach 
all the handles. Press-and-hold the Shift 
key, grab a corner point, and drag inward 
until the photo fits the image how you 
want it (as seen here), then press Return 
(PC: Enter) to lock in your transformation. 

(Continued) 



Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



Chapter 12 



415 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Seven: 

Let's go ahead and bring in three more 
photos using the same Add Media com- 
mand we just used in the previous step. 
Also, like the previous step, we need to 
change their order in the Layers panel 
so they're right above the first photo 
in the layer stack, and of course, you'll 
have to resize them all to fit using Free 
Transform, as well. 



Step Eight: 

At this point (at the end of these photos), 
we're about at the 30-second point in our 
video, so let's go back to including some 
video clips. We've already added them, 
so it's just a matter of moving them into 
the order we want and trimming the 
in/out points. Keep in mind, when you're 
trimming, start just before the movement 
starts and end right after it stops, so 
we have tight, short clips. After we add 
in the other clips, we're right at about 
56 seconds. 



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► 41 6 Chapter 12 Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 













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Step Nine: 

Okay, now that our clips in are order, 
let's add some music (and make sure we 
like how the order flows once we drop 
a background music track in). Go to the 
Timeline panel, click-and-hold on the 
little musical notes icon to the right of 
Audio Track, and from the pop-up menu 
that appears, choose Add Audio. Select 
your background music track (we'll use 
the same one we used back on page 
392), click Open, and it's added to your 
movie (audio tracks appear in green). 
This music track is actually around 4 min- 
utes long, so go ahead and trim this 
back to around 1 minute (audio tracks 
trim the same way video tracks do, but 
since there is no video, instead of a pop- 
up video preview, you get a pop-up with 
the length of time at the current end 
position, so just watch that number until 
you get down to around an End at 1:00, 
as shown at the bottom here). 



Step 10: 

You'll probably want the music to fade 
out at the end (rather than just cutting off 
abruptly), and you do that by clicking on 
that little triangle at the end of the audio 
track. That brings up the Audio settings 
dialog with controls for when the music 
fades in and out. Choose a second or two 
before the end of your movie for the Fade 
Out, then click anywhere outside the dia- 
log to close it and accept your Fade Out. 



(Continued) 



Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop Chapter 12 41 7 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step 11: 

While we're at the end of the timeline 
like this, let's go ahead and set a fade to 
black for the end of our movie. Click on 
the Transition icon, click on Fade with 
Black, set the Duration, and then drag- 
and-drop Fade with Black right onto 
the end of your last video clip (as shown 
here). Also, press the Home key on your 
keyboard (or the Go to First Frame icon 
at the top left of the Timeline panel) to 
get back to the beginning of your movie, 
then add a Fade with Black transition to 
the beginning of your first video clip, so 
when your movie starts, it fades in from 
a solid black screen. 



Step 12: 

If you go ahead and hit Play at this point, 
you'll see your video fade in from black, 
you'll hear your background music, but 
you'll also hear something else: any 
audio your camera picked up when you 
recorded your video clips. In some cases, 
you might want to hear this, but in our 
case, we only want to hear the back- 
ground music (and not us calling out 
cues to each other during the shoot). So, 
let's turn off the audio that's in our clips. 
We can't just click on that speaker icon 
to the right of Audio Track (that's the 
main on/off for audio), so what you'll do 
is click on the little triangle at the end of 
the video clip you want to affect and a 
settings dialog pops up with video and 
audio controls. Click on the music notes 
icon to bring up the Audio settings, then 
turn on the Mute Audio checkbox. Okay, 
now do that for all your video clips. 



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Untitled 1 @ 33.3aJtMVL0003.MOV, RCB/8) * 





► 41 8 Chapter 12 Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



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Step 13: 

Once you're at the end of the timeline, 
if you're wondering how we're going to 
stretch this video out to fill a full 60 sec- 
onds, we can either: (a) add another photo 
or a video clip, or (b) extend the length of 
time one of the photos is onscreen (that's 
the great thing about using a still — you 
can make it any length you'd like). So, just 
click on a photo clip, and click-and-drag 
out the end of that purple bar (as shown 
here) to any length you'd like (kind of the 
opposite of trimming). Rather than doing 
it all to just one photo (so that one stays 
onscreen really long), you should prob- 
ably add a little to one, and a little to 
another, until you reach 60 seconds right 
on the money. 



Step 14: 

Now it's time for some finishing touches. 
Let's add some Cross Fade transitions 
between our video clips and our photos 
by clicking on the Transition icon, click- 
ing on Cross Fade, setting the Duration 
amount (I use around 1 second, generally), 
and dragging-and-dropping Cross Fade 
right between the various clips and pho- 
tos on your timeline. Go ahead and do 
that now for all our clips, so there are no 
hard cuts between images. Note: There 
will be times, depending on the subject 
and the theme of your video, where hard 
cuts will be what you want to use, but for 
this particular project, we're going with 
Cross Fades. 



(Continued) 



Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop Chapter 12 41 9 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step 15: 

Okay, it's time to experience another 
"Weird Photoshop Video Quirk." Now 
that you've put in all your transitions, 
scroll to the end of your timeline, where 
you'll probably be shocked to see that 
your video, which was 60 seconds long 
a few steps ago, is now around 52 sec- 
onds. Why in the world is that? It's be- 
cause of a weird way that Photoshop 
handles transitions — it actually shortens 
each clip a little to create that cross- 
fade effect (I know, I know, don't get me 
started). Anyway, it is what it is, and so 
all we can do is adjust the length of 
either our video clips or photos to fill in 
that missing time. You know how to do 
it (since you did it earlier in this project), 
so let's go ahead and stretch things out 
until the movie is 60 seconds long. By 
the way, if you don't actually need the 
video to be a certain time length, you 
can skip this part altogether. 



Step 16: 

We have two last things to do to finish 
our movie off. The first is adding some 
text (which you learned about back on 
page 406). Easy enough, just scroll to the 
first frame of our video, get the Type 
tool, choose Helvetica as your font, and 
type in "performance." (as shown here). 
As you know from before, something 
funky is going to happen here: it doesn't 
add the text above your video track, by 
default it adds it right to your track, imme- 
diately after your selected clip (it treats it 
like you added another video or photo). 





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► 420 Chapter 12 Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



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Step 17: 

To get this text layer to appear on top of 
your video, you have to go to the Layers 
panel and drag it to the top of the layer 
stack and out of Video Group 1, so it 
creates a new track above your video track. 
Sadly, you still won't see your text at this 
point, because while it does take your text 
and adds it to a new track, it also moves it 
so it starts wherever your playhead is. So, 
find your type clip, click on it, and drag 
it back to the beginning of your movie. 
Actually, the text doesn't look that good 
over the first clip, so drag it above the 
second clip, and indent it a little, so the 
second clip plays for a moment before the 
text appears. Also, add a Fade transition 
to your text, so it fades in (you can see 
the transition in the next step). 



Step 18: 

To add more text above other video clips 
is actually easier: first, drag your play- 
head over to the video clip where you 
want the next text clip to appear (I went 
to the third clip here). Now, just click on 
your Type layer, and press Command-J 
(PC: Ctrl-J) to duplicate your text layer. 
This automatically creates a new track 
above your existing text track in the 
timeline. You really don't need more 
tracks to keep track of (no pun intended), 
so once it appears, just click-and-drag 
it back down to your original text track 
in the timeline (as shown here, where 
they're both on the same track). Double- 
click on the "J" thumbnail over in the 
Layers panel to highlight your text, go 
up to the Options Bar and change the 
text color to white, and then type in 
"power." Next, use the Move tool (V) to 
reposition it. 

(Continued) 



Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop Chapter 12 421 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step 19: 

Go ahead and duplicate that text layer 
a few more times so you can add "pres- 
tige." and "passion." and "pricey." Just 
kidding on that last one — how about 
"perfection." (ahhh, much better)? Add 
these over whichever clips you like best, 
and position them where you want them, 
as well (totally your call). Okay, one last 
tweak before we save our movie — let's 
add some motion to our photos. That's 
right baby, we can make 'em move. 
Go to the first photo, click on the little 
triangle at the end of the purple bar, 
and the Motion dialog appears. Choose 
Pan & Zoom from the pop-up menu 
(as shown here) and now this still photo 
moves slowly from side-to-side as it also 
slowly zooms in tighter (it's a pretty cool 
effect). Add any one of these motion 
effects to as few, or as many, of the 
photos as you like. Of course, go ahead 
and play your entire video and make 
sure it's just like you want it. 



Step 20: 

Now it's time to save out our project 
as a movie (so we can share it, email it, 
put in on YouTube, or our phones, etc.). 
Click on the Render Video icon at the 
bottom-left corner of the Timeline panel 
(shown circled in red above), to bring up 
the Render Video (export) dialog shown 
here. Give your file a name, and then 
from the Preset pop-up menu, choose 
the format you want for your video (in 
our case, we'll be sending our video to 
YouTube). Lastly, this preset is choosing 
29 fps, but we're not certain that's what 
your camera shot, so to keep from hav- 
ing jittery or jumpy video playback, from 
the Frame Rate pop-up menu, choose 
Document Frame Rate, then click the 
Render button. In about five (errrr...10?) 
minutes your video is exported and 
ready for upload (of course, play it once 
to make sure everything came out the 
way you wanted). 





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► 422 Chapter 12 Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



: 



Photoshop Killer Tips 



How to Have Mini Bridge Tuck Itself 
Away After You Open an Image 




If you have Mini Bridge docked to 
the right side of your screen (rather 
than its default location along the 
bottom), you can Right-click directly 
on Mini Bridge's tab and from the 
pop-up menu that appears choose 
Auto-Collapse Iconic Panels. That 
way, when you double-click on an 
image to open it, as soon as it opens 
and you click anywhere outside Mini 
Bridge, it will tuck itself out of sight 
automatically (saving you from hav- 
ing to close it yourself each time). 



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In Photoshop CS6, Adobe brought 
back the Contact Sheet II automation 



(see Chapter 11), but they also brought back 
two more built-in automations that users 
have missed since they were removed 
back in CS4. We have PDF Presentation 
and Layer Comps to PDF back in Photo- 
shop CS6 (they're found under the File 
menu, under Automate and Scripts). 

Opening a Second Image from 
Mini Bridge Using Drag-and-Drop 

In the Mini Bridge chapter, I mentioned 
that you can drag-and-drop a thumbnail 
out into Photoshop's image area and it 
opens (Mac users must have the Appli- 
cation Frame [found under the Window 
menu] turned on). Anyway, what happens 
if you drag one image out to the image 




area and it opens, but then you want to 
drag another image out there? If you drag 
over the open image, it thinks you want to 
add the second image as a layer on top of 
the first image (and hey, maybe you do, in 
which case this is a tip on how to do that). 
If you want to open a second image in its 
own separate document, then make sure 
your documents open as tabs, and click- 
and-drag its thumbnail up until it's just to 
the right of the first image's document tab. 
Release your mouse and it adds your sec- 
ond image as a separate document. 

Changing Your Brush's Size, Hard- 
ness, and Even Opacity on the Fly 

If you press-and-hold Option-Ctrl (PC: 

Alt) and click (PC: Right-click) your brush 

anywhere within your image, it brings up 




LI Zoom with Scroll Wheel 

[J Zoom Clicked Point to Center 

Enable Flick Panning 

'J Varv Round Brush Hardness based on HUD vertical movement 

H Place or Drag Raster Images as Smart Objects 

^ Snap Vector Tools and Transforms to Pixel Grid 



a preview of your currently selected 
brush tip (as shown here), with a little 
heads-up display showing you the cur- 
rent size, hardness amount, and brush 
opacity. Now you can drag straight 
upward to make it softer or down 
to make it harder. Drag left to make 
the brush size smaller; right to make 
it larger. That's cool, but now here's 
the trick: You can change one setting 
so that, instead of softness/hardness, 
dragging up/down changes the brush 
opacity. To do that, press Command-K 
(PC: Ctrl-K) to bring up Photoshop's 
Preferences, and then in the General 
preferences, turn off the checkbox for 
Vary Round Brush Hardness Based on 
HUD Vertical Movement. Now when 
you drag up/down, it changes the 
brush opacity instead. 

Applying a Layer Style to More 
Than One Layer at a Time 

Put your layers in a group by Command- 
clicking (PC: Ctrl-clicking) on each one 
in the Layers panel to select them, and 
choosing New Group from Layers from 



Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



Chapter 12 



423 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Photoshop Killer Tips 




the panel's flyout menu. Now you 
can apply your group style (say, a drop 
shadow, for example) directly to that 
group, and it automatically applies that 
layer style to every layer in that group 
(and it doesn't matter how many layers 
you put inside that group — it adds it to 
all of them instantly). You can also add 
more than one layer style, if you like: 
just click on the group, then double- 
click on the fx icon to the right of the 
group name to re-open the dialog, and 
choose a layer style in the list on the 
left (let's say Outer Glow, for example) 
and it adds that style, along with the 
Drop Shadow you added earlier. 

If You Work with a Lot of Layers, 
You're Going to Want to Learn This! 

If you've created a big multi-layer file, 
you're going to have a long scrolling list 
of layers, and sometimes finding the layer 
you're looking for gets really time-consum- 
ing. Luckily, in CS6, there's now a filter bar 



at the top of the Layers panel. On the left 
side of this bar is a search pop-up menu, 
which changes your choices to the right of 
it. It's set to Kind by default, which gives 
you icons, and if you click on those icons, 
it filters to just show you particular kinds 
of layers. For example, if you click on the 
"T" icon, it hides all the other layers but 
your Type layers. I don't mean it hides 
them from view on your image, I mean 
now you only see Type layers in the Layers 
panel (every other kind of layer is hidden). 
There are filters to just show pixel layers 
(regular old image layers), just adjustment 
layers, just shape layers, or just smart ob- 
ject layers, and all it takes is one click on 
any of these to quickly see just those types 
of layers. You can also search for layers by 
Name (a text field appears, so you can 
type in a name to search for), or by Effect 
(a pop-up menu of layer styles appears), 
or which blend mode you used, or a spe- 
cific attribute, or assigned color. It's really 
pretty slick, and blindingly fast. When 
you're done (and you want to turn the fil- 
tering off), click on the little toggle switch 
on the far right of the filter bar. 











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Want to Get Rid of All Your Hidden 
Layers Before You Save Your File? 

Go to the Layers panel, and from the 

search pop-up menu at the top left of 

the filter bar at the top of the panel, 

choose Attribute, and then, from the 

pop-up menu that appears to the right, 

choose Not Visible. Now it displays any 



Q 




layers you're not using (since they're hid- 
den). Select them all and hit the Delete 
(PC: Backspace) key, and they're gone. 
Not only does this make your Layers 
panel shorter (less layers to scroll through), 
but it also makes your file size smaller by 
getting rid of layers you're not using. 

A Faster Way to Resize 



Croup t nC 5 how Trans re r™ Coritro 5 



If you find yourself doing a lot of resizing 
of objects or selections, you'll be press- 
ing Command-T (PC: Ctrl-T) a lot to bring 
up Free Transform, but there's a faster way: 
Click on the Move tool (V), and then up 
in the Options Bar, turn on the checkbox 



► 424 Chapter 12 Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



Photoshop Killer Tips 



for Show Transform Controls. This leaves 
the Free Transform handles visible all the 
time, around any selection or object on a 
layer, so all you have to do is grab a cor- 
ner point and drag (of course, press-and- 
hold the Shift key to keep things resizing 
proportionally). 

New Maximum Brush Size 

Back in CS5, the maximum size you could 
make any brush was 2,500 pixels, which 
seems like a lot until you have all these 
new DSLRs that are over 30 megapixels, 
and all of sudden, your biggest brush isn't 
big enough. That's why you'll be happy to 
know, not only can you make your brush 
sizes more than 2,500 pixels, you can go 
all the way 5,000 pixels. Yeah, baby! 




New Power for the Eyedropper 

If you've added an adjustment layer above 
an image, and you use the Eyedropper 
tool to sample a color from that image, 
of course the color it picks is going to be 
based on how the adjustment layer is af- 
fecting that image, right? Right. However, 
in CS6, you can now make the Eyedropper 
tool ignore the effect of any adjustment 
layer and, instead, sample from your image 
layers. You do this by choosing All Layers 
No Adjustments from the Sample pop-up 
menu in the Options Bar. 




Not Sure Which Method to 
Choose for Resizing Your Image? 
Let Photoshop Choose 

If having to choose which interpolation 
method to use when resizing made your 
head hurt (and it did for a lot of folks), 
then you'll be happy to see the new de- 
fault is Bicubic Automatic, which means 
Photoshop will automatically choose the 
best one for what you want to do. 



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Nearest Neighbor (preserve hard edges} 
Scale St Bilinear 

(v'l Constra Bicubic (best for smooth gradients} 
p-d Bicubic Smoother (best for enlargement) 

Bicubic Sharper (best for reduction) 



New Trick for Selecting Skin Tones 

If you have skin tones that needs ad- 
justing (maybe your subject's skin tone 
looks too red, but the rest of the photo 
looks good, which is more common than 
you might think), then you'll want to 
know this new little tweak in Photoshop 
CS6: if you go to under the Select menu 
and choose Color Range, and then 

Color Range 



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from the Select pop-up menu at the 
top of the dialog, choose Skin Tones, it 

looks for flesh tones and selects them. 
If you're just trying to select skin tones 
in your subject's face, then turn on the 



Detect Faces checkbox to refine it even 
further. Then, drag the Fuzziness slider 
(kind of like the Tolerance amount in the 
Magic Wand tool) down to 1 and see 
what that looks like. If you need to raise 
the amount to select more skin, drag it 
to the right. 

Saving Your Work Automatically 

Photoshop is an amazingly stable pro- 
gram (it hardly ever crashes for me, well... 
unless I'm in front of an audience, then 
it senses fear), but if for some reason 
it does crash (hey, it happens), you're 
not out of luck if you haven't saved the 
document you're working on in a while. 
Well, at least not in CS6, because there's 
a new Auto Save feature that saves 
your document automatically at what- 
ever amount of time you choose. You 
do this by going under the Photoshop 
(PC: Edit) menu, under Preferences, and 
choosing File Handling. At the bottom 
of the File Saving Options section, you'll 



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see the Automatically Save Recovery 
Information Every checkbox and a pop- 
up menu set to 10 Minutes by default (so, 
the most you can lose at any time is 10 
minutes worth of work). But, if you can't 
bear to lose even that, you can choose 
5 Minutes, or go the other way and in- 
crease the amount of time before it saves 
(for the brave at heart). 



Editing DSLR Video in Photoshop 



Chapter 12 



425 < 




Photo by Scott Kelby Exposure: 3.0 sec | | Aperture Value: //11 



Chapter 13 My Step-by-Step Workflow 







Workflow 

my step-by-step workflow 



I'm about to let you behind the curtain and into the world 
of my own personal workflow. Not my Photoshop workflow, 
mind you, but the workflow I use to find the names for 
titles of chapter intros (it would be more useful to write a 
chapter on my Photoshop CS6 workflow, though. Maybe 
I'll do that after this page). Anyway, this has been a highly 
guarded, super-secretive process, shrouded in mystery and 
ensconced in velvet, but today, for you, I'm revealing it for 
the first time ever. So, here's what I do: First, I choose which 
word I want to search for (so, for a chapter on color correc- 
tion, I can search for either color or correction), then I type 
my first choice into Apple's iTunes Store, because it shows 
movies, TV shows, and music. For the word "color," you get 
about a bazillion matches (especially songs), but depending 
on the word you choose, it might not return any results at 
all, in which case, I go to IMDb (Internet Movie Database; 



www.imdb.com) and type in the word there. So, for this 
chapter, I figured I'd type in the word "work" and I'd get 
lots of results (like "Workin' for a Livin'" by Huey Lewis & 
The News, for example), but on a lark, I typed in "workflow" 
and son-of-a-gun if one result didn't come up: the two- 
song album "Workflow" by Ricky Ambilotti. In the world 
of psychotic chapter intro writers, this is as good as it gets. 
Now, you're probably thinking, "Wow, that's a surprisingly 
easy process," and to some extent it is, but there is some- 
thing I didn't tell you that makes this process much, much 
harder. I never learned to read. I know that sounds kind of 
weird coming from someone who writes books for a living, 
but sadly, it's true. When I was in grade school, I skipped 
the reading class, because back then I was much more 
interested in hacking into the WOPR using my 300-baud 
dial-up modem and playing chess with Dr. Falken. 



427 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



My Photoshop CS6 

Digital Photography 

Workflow 



I've been asked many times, "What is your Photoshop digital photography workflow?" 
(What should I do first? What comes next? Etc.) So, I thought I would add this chapter 
here in the back of the book to bring it all together. This chapter isn't about learning 
new techniques (you've already learned all the things you'll need for your workflow), 
it's about seeing the whole process, from start to finish, in order. Every photographer 
has a different workflow that works for them, and I hope that sharing mine helps you 
build a workflow that works for you and your style of work. 



Step One: 

Like most photographers today, most 
of my workflow takes place in Camera 
Raw. I honestly believe it is the fastest 
and easiest way to get your images look- 
ing the way you want them (even if you 
didn't shoot in RAW format). So, I start in 
Mini Bridge by navigating to the folder 
of images I imported from my camera's 
memory card, then Right-clicking on the 
image I want to edit and, under Open 
With, choosing Camera Raw (as shown 
here). I'm going to edit one of the photos 
that I shot during a workshop I was teach- 
ing out in Moab, Utah. It's not a great shot 
on any level, but it has enough problems 
to deal with that I thought it would give 
you a good insight into how I deal with 
them (of course, you can download this 
same image and follow right along with 
me — the web address for the book's 
companion website is in the book's 
introduction up front). 



Step Two: 

Here's the original RAW image open in 
Camera Raw. The first thing I do at this 
point is figure out what's wrong with the 
photo, and the question I ask myself is 
simple: "What do I wish were different?" 
Here, I wish the sky was darker and there 
was more definition in the clouds. I wish 
the whole photo had a lot more contrast 
and detail and was more vibrant overall. 
Of course, I wish everything was sharper, 
but since I always sharpen every photo, 
that's a given. 





► 428 



Chapter 13 



My Step-by-Step Workflow 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



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Step Three: 

Normally, I start by adjusting the white 
balance (see page 26), but in this case, 
I'm okay with the overall color tempera- 
ture (don't get me wrong, I'm going to 
pump up the color in just a moment, but 
as far as it being too warm or too cool, or 
just totally wrong, I'm okay with that part 
for this particular photo. That's pretty 
common for shots taken outdoors, where 
white balance usually isn't a big issue). 
We're going to start with the thing that 
bugs me the most (which is what I usually 
do), and in this case, it's the sky. It's just 
too stark and bland (take a look at the 
image in Step Two for a reference). Here's 
the recipe for darkening the sky: (1) Lower 
the Highlights slider a lot (here, I dragged 
it down to -43). Then, (2) lower the Expo- 
sure a bit (I lowered it to -0.65), which 
affects the sky big time (since it controls 
the midtones). Then, (3) increase the Con- 
trast a lot (to +71 here) to give it some 
"oomph," and you can see that helped 
a lot (again, compare it to Step Two). If 
you need a refresher on the Basic panel 
sliders, go back to Chapter 2. 



Step Four: 

Now, we stop and see what it needs 
next. Back in Step Three, the mountains 
look way too dark, so we'll have to open 
up those dark shadow areas by dragging 
the Shadows slider way over to the right 
(here I went to +91). When you increase 
the Shadows a lot, like we did here, it 
can make the blacks look washed out, 
so I generally drag the Blacks slider to 
the left to balance it out (here, I dragged 
to -38). To bring out some highlights, 
I increased the Whites to +17 (I couldn't 
increase the Highlights — they were busy 
keeping the sky dark). The sky started 
getting a little bright from all that, so 
I lowered the Highlights even more 
(down to -89). 

(Continued) 



My Step-by-Step Workflow 



Chapter 13 



429 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Five: 

A landscape photo like this, with lots of 
well-defined edges and texture, is just 
screaming out for Clarity! (You can hear 
it, can't you?) So, I cranked it up here 
quite a bit, to +53. This tends to give the 
image a little tiny bit of an HDR feel, so 
if you're an anti-HDRite (and you know 
who you are), then don't drag it as far as 
I did (you might want to stop at +20 or 
+25). I also increased the Vibrance to +17 
to punch up the colors a little more. As 
I go through this process, at certain times 
the overall image may look a little too 
dark or two bright, and if either is the 
case, I just drag the Exposure slider a 
little to the right if I need it brighter, or 
left if it's too bright. It was looking a little 
dark, so I increased the Exposure from 
-0.65 up to -0.50. 



Step Six: 

Okay, to me that sky is starting to look 
too light again, and I can't lower the 
Exposure any more, or the whole photo 
will be underexposed, so we're going 
to add a neutral density gradient filter 
effect (out in the field, I'd do this by 
putting a filter in front of my lens that 
graduates from a dark gray down to 
transparent. That way, it darkens the sky, 
but leaves the foreground alone, which 
helps balance landscape photos where 
your foreground exposure looks right, so 
your sky isn't way too bright). However, if 
you didn't have that filter with you, you 
can replicate it here in Camera Raw. Click 
on the Graduated Filter tool in the toolbar 
up top. When the panel appears, lower 
the Exposure and the Highlights amounts, 
then increase the Saturation. Now, click- 
and-drag from the top of the image to 
around the horizon line, and it darkens 
the top of the sky, then trails off (but it 
also intensifies the blue color in the sky, 
because you increased the color satura- 
tion, too). For more on how to use the 
Graduated Filter, see page 109. 





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► 430 



Chapter 13 



My Step-by-Step Workflow 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 





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Step Seven: 

Click the Open Image button to open this 
photo into Photoshop. Now that the sky 
has been fixed, the next most annoying 
thing has got to be that ugly tree creep- 
ing into the frame from the right side. 
A "creeping edge tree" has killed more 
landscape photos than I can count, but 
it's not going to kill this one, because we 
have Content-Aware Fill. Get the Lasso 
tool (L), and draw a selection around the 
offending tree (as shown here). 



Step Eight: 

Press the Delete (PC: Backspace) key 

to bring up the Fill dialog (shown here). 
By the way, this only works if your image 
is the Background layer. If this image is on 
a regular layer (you have a multi-layered 
file), then pressing Delete just deletes your 
selection, which probably is a bad thing, 
so in that case go under the Edit menu 
and choose Fill. When the dialog appears, 
just click OK, and in a few seconds, that 
nasty-looking tree is gone. You'll probably 
need to grab the Healing Brush (press 
Shift-J until you have it) and clean up any 
little spots or areas it missed (just Option- 
click [PC: Alt-click] in a clean area, then 
move your cursor over the area you need 
to fix and click), but at this point, it should 
only take a few seconds with either that 
or the Clone Stamp tool. For more on 
Content-Aware Fill, see page 258. 



(Continued) 



My Step-by-Step Workflow Chapter 13 431 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step Nine: 

Okay, it's decision time once again. 
What does it need next? I think the whole 
image could be a little more vibrant, so I 
can: (a) Reopen this image in Camera Raw 
and drag the Vibrance slider to the right 
until it looks good to me. You'll have to 
save the file as a JPEG, PSD, or TIFF first. 
(See page 19 if you don't remember how 
to do this.) Or, (b) do this right in Photo- 
shop. Go under the Image menu, under 
Mode, and choose Lab Color, then do 
the Apply Image move we learned back 
on page 289. I chose the "a" channel here. 
Whichever you choose, it will add color 
and contrast. Don't forget to switch back 
to RGB Color mode when you're done. 



Step 10: 

I try to keep the viewer's attention off the 
outside edges of my image and focused 
on the subject instead. One trick to do 
that (well, my favorite anyway) is to darken 
the edges all the way around with an 
edge vignette. I used the Lens Correc- 
tion dialog here, which we learned two 
ways to do, starting on page 206. 



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► 432 



Chapter 13 



My Step-by-Step Workflow 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 





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Step 11: 

Here's the image after you've added the 
edge darkening, and you can see how it 
focuses your attention through the use 
of light (your eye is automatically drawn 
to the brightest thing in the photo), to 
the mountains. 



Step 12: 

At this point, it's time to sharpen (I usu- 
ally save this until last), so go under the 
Filter menu, under Sharpen, and choose 
Unsharp Mask. Enter 90% for Amount, 
set the Radius to 1 .3, and set the Thresh- 
old to 3 (more on sharpening, starting 
back on page 328). This is some really 
punchy sharpening (note the Radius 
being increased past 1), but an image 
like this (and most landscape images), 
can really take a lot of sharpening and 
they look great. Go ahead and click OK. 



(Continued) 



My Step-by-Step Workflow Chapter 13 433 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Step 13: 

After I run the Unsharp Mask filter, I try 
to limit any halos or other color nasties 
that might appear by immediately go- 
ing under the Edit menu and choosing 
Fade. Then, I change the blend Mode to 
Luminosity (as seen here), which applies 
my sharpening to just the detail areas 
of the image, and not the color areas, 
which helps me avoid lots of sharpening 
hazards. I also lowered the Opacity to 
90%. A before/after is shown on the next 
page. Since we did wind up opening the 
shadows quite a bit, and adding lots of 
clarity, it has a little bit of an HDR look 
to it. If you want less, use less clarity 
(back in Step Five), but if you want even 
more of an HDR effect, then go under 
the Image menu, under Adjustments, 
and choose Shadows/Highlights. Low- 
er the Shadows Amount to (zero), but 
increase the Midtone Contrast slider (if 
you don't see it, turn on the Show More 
Options checkbox) to around +25. I didn't 
add that here, but I thought you should 
know it's there. That's pretty typical of 
what I do for my workflow. Remember, 
it all starts with asking "What do I wish 
were different?" Once you know that, 
go back and find the techniques in this 
book that will get you there. 




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► 434 



Chapter 13 



My Step-by-Step Workflow 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS( 



for Digital Photographers 




After 



My Step-by-Step Workflow Chapter 13 435 4 



This page intentionally left blank 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



Index 

8-bit mode, 92, 150 
16-bit mode, 92, 150,376 
18% gray card, 29 
50% magnification, 328 
100% view, 49, 62 



about this book, xiv-xvii 

actions 

high-contrast look, 272-275 
luminosity sharpening, 337-339 

Actions panel, 272, 337-339 

Adaptation pop-up menu, 265 

Adaptive Wide Angle filter, 241-247 

Add Layer Mask icon, 54, 95 

Add Media option, 384, 407, 415, 416 

Add Noise filter, 376 

Adjust Edge sliders, 235 

Adjustment Brush, 100 

Auto Mask feature, 101, 102 
brush cursor display, 1 1 8 
Clear All button, 119 
color swatch additions, 119 
contrast increased with, 108, 156 
deleting adjustments made with, 101 
dodging and burning with, 100-105 
double-stacking adjustments with, 117 
drawing straight lines with, 1 1 8 
Erase mode for, 1 04, 1 05, 1 1 4 
HDR processing with, 193 
hiding edit pins for, 1 1 9 
killer tips about, 118-119 
painting white balance with, 1 1 5 
reducing shadow noise with, 1 1 6 
resizing the brush, 1 07, 111, 119 
retouching portraits with, 37, 107-108 
Show Mask checkbox, 1 02, 1 1 9 
softening skin with, 107 
special effects using, 111-114 

adjustment layers 

Black & White, 154,402 
canceling edits on, 379 
Color Lookup, 314-315 
Curves, 49, 403 
enlarging controls for, 351 



Gradient, 288, 398-399 

Gradient Map, 159, 161,311-313 

ignoring with Eyedropper tool, 425 

layer masks and, 266 

Levels, 49, 159 

Photo Filter, 323 

Shadows/Highlights, 266, 434 

video feature and, 402-403 
Adjustments panel, 1 58, 1 59, 1 65, 31 1 , 31 4, 323 
Adobe Bridge 

bonus chapters on, xvi, 3 

Camera Raw version in, 20 

finding photos in, 13 

launching from Mini Bridge, 2 

syncing with Mini Bridge, 14 

See also Mini Bridge 
Adobe Photoshop. See Photoshop CS6 
Adobe RGB color space, 91 , 354, 356, 357, 358 
Adobe Standard profile, 24 
all-purpose sharpening, 332 
Alpha channels, 257 
Ambience slider, 309 
Amount slider 

Shadows/Highlights dialog, 214 

Sharpening controls, 61, 63 

Smart Sharpen filter, 344 

Unsharp Mask dialog, 329, 333 

Vignetting controls, 76, 77, 79, 206 
Angle control, 252 
Angular Direction slider, 293 
animation, keyframe, 410 
Aperture Priority mode, 172 
Application Frame, 237 
Apply Image dialog, 57 
Arrow keys, 252, 386, 387 
As Shot white balance, 28 
aspect ratio, 44 
Assign Profile dialog, 358 
Audio settings dialog, 393 
audio tracks for video, 392-395 

background music, 392-393, 417 

narration or voice-over, 394 
Auto button, Camera Raw, 35, 49, 96 
Auto Ghosting feature, 179 
Auto Mask feature, 1 01 , 1 02, 1 1 1 , 1 1 2 
Auto Save feature, 425 
Auto Tone adjustments, 35 
Auto-Align feature, 172 



Index 



437 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Auto-Align Layers function, 201, 224, 229 
Auto-Collapse Iconic Panels option, 423 
Automate options, 377, 423 
Auto-Spacing checkbox, 378 

B 

Background layer, 149 
backgrounds 

blur effects for, 299-304 

compositing selections and, 237-240 

night light effect for, 320-323 
backlit subjects, 33, 212-214 
banding in prints, 376 
barrel distortion, 252 
Batch dialog, 339-341 
batch processing 

renaming files, 341 

sharpening photos, 339-341 
before/after previews, 48 
Bicubic sampling methods, 140, 425 
Big Bridge. See Adobe Bridge 
bit depth, 92 

Black & White adjustment layer, 1 54, 402 
Black & White view, Refine Edge dialog, 233 
Black Point Compensation checkbox, 372 
black-and-white conversions, 154-168 

Camera Raw method for, 154-157 

contrast added to, 155-156, 159 

duotone effects and, 164 

Merge to HDR Pro for, 350 

painting with B&W, 111-112 

photo toning effects and, 31 1-313 

quadtone effects and, 165-166 

Silver Efex Pro 2 plug-in for, 168 

split-toning effects and, 162-163 

three-click method for, 158-161 
Blacks slider, 34, 155,277,429 
blemish removal, 85, 106 
Blend If sliders, 149 
blend modes 

Color, 217, 240 

Color Burn, 218 

Darken, 310 

Difference, 201 

Hard Light, 190,348 

keyboard shortcuts for, 48 

Luminosity, 359, 434 

Multiply, 375 



Overlay, 159, 177, 218, 236, 271, 274, 412 

pop-up menu for, 267 

Screen, 266, 375 

Soft Light, 57, 159, 178, 186, 207, 218, 271 

toggling through, 218, 266 

Vivid Light, 240, 272 
blended HDR images, 198-205 
blur 

adding to backgrounds, 299-304 

Blur Filter effects, 295-304, 321 

Gaussian Blur effect, 177, 186, 207, 279 

night lights background blur, 321-322 

painting in Camera Raw, 118 

Surface Blur effect, 240, 273 
Blur Effects panel, 297, 321 
Blur filter 

Field Blur, 302-304 

Iris Blur, 299-301,321 

Tilt-Shift Blur, 295-298 
Blur Gallery, 295 
Blur slider, 296, 302, 303, 322 
Blur Tools panel, 296, 297, 301, 302, 322 
Bokeh sliders, 297, 321, 322 
bonus features 

Adobe Bridge chapters, xvi, 3 

Curves chapter, xvii 

sample image files, xiv 
borders, Instagram, 283 
Bracket keys ([ ]) 

reordering layers using, 325 

resizing brushes using, 107, 1 1 1 

rotating slides using, 15 

scrolling through layers using, 1 1 8 
bracketed photos, 173-174 
Bridge. See Adobe Bridge; Mini Bridge 
brightening prints, 375 
Bristle Detail slider, 292 
brush cursor, 1 18, 220 
Brush Picker, 55, 266 
Brush sliders, Oil Paint filter, 291-292 
Brush tool 

changing blend modes for, 267 

double-processing and, 55 

eyeglass reflections and, 226 

Fill Light look and, 95 

group shot fixes and, 230 

HDR images and, 1 91 , 202-203 

HUD color picker and, 209, 267 

opacity settings for, 203, 423 



► 438 



Index 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographer: 



selection cleanup and, 236 
sharpening techniques and, 191, 348 
special effects and, 271 

brushes 

hardness settings for, 150, 423 

new maximum size for, 425 

resizing, 107, 111, 119, 150,316,317 

burning and dodging. See dodging and burning 

c 

calibrating 

Camera Raw for cameras, 87 

monitors for printing, 361-363 
Camera Calibration panel, 22, 23, 87, 95 
Camera Landscape profile, 25 
camera profiles, 24-25 
Camera Raw, 18-49, 52-97, 100-119 

assigning color profiles in, 97 

Auto button, 35, 49, 96 

B&W conversions in, 154-157 

Basic panel controls, 21, 22-23 

before/after previews in, 48 

Blacks slider, 34, 155,277,429 

Bridge version of, 20 

calibrating for cameras, 87 

camera profiles used in, 24-25 

chromatic aberration fixes in, 74-75 

Clarity slider, 36-37, 156, 430 

color adjustments, 82-83 

contrast adjustments, 38-43 

Contrast slider, 31 , 1 55, 281 , 429 

cropping photos in, 44-46, 149 

Default button, 35, 48 

deleting photos in, 48 

digital photography workflow, 428-430 

DNG conversion in, 80-81 

dodging and burning in, 100-105 

double-processing in, 52-57 

edge vignetting and, 76-79 

editing multiple photos in, 58-60 

Effects icon, 282 

Exposure slider, 30, 429 

Fill Light slider, 23, 33, 94-95 

Full Screen mode, 49, 96 

Graduated Filter tool, 109-110 

HDR image processing in, 184-185, 192-195, 199 

high-contrast look created in, 276-277 

Highlights slider, 32, 320, 429 



histogram in, 97 

JPEG and TIFF images in, 18-19, 20, 58 

killer tips about, 48-49, 96-97, 118-119 

lens correction features, 66-73, 74-75, 76 

localized corrections in, 100 

new sliders in CS6 version of, 21 

Noise Reduction feature, 88-90, 96, 209 

opening photos in, 13, 18-19, 324 

portrait retouching in, 106-108 

Preferences dialog, 35, 62, 81 

Presets panel, 39, 167 

Preview area in, 49 

process versions of, 22-23, 95 

rating photos in, 49 

Shadows slider, 32-33, 156, 429 

sharpening photos in, 61-65 

skipping the window for, 48 

Snapshots panel, 1 18 

special effects using, 111-114 

Split Toning panel, 282 

Spot Removal tool, 49, 84-86 

straightening photos in, 47 

Temperature slider, 27-28 

Tint slider, 27-28 

Tone Curve panel, 38-43, 156, 281-282, 283 

Vibrance slider, 277, 281 , 430 

White Balance settings, 26-29 

Whites slider, 33, 34, 155, 277, 429 

Workflow Options dialog, 91-93 

See also RAW images 
Camera Standard profile, 24-25 
Camera Vivid profile, 25 
cameras. See digital cameras 
Canon cameras, 24, 25, 172, 174, 354 
canvas 

adding around images, 126 

changing the color of, 379 

rotating for tablets, 96 
capture sharpening, 61 
carousel view, 6 
cast shadows, 267 
cell phones 

designing for, 325 

photo noise removal, 209 
Channel pop-up menu, 42, 43, 289 
channels 

adjusting individual, 42-43 

keyboard shortcuts for, 149 



Index 



439 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Channels panel, 330 
Character panel, 409 
chromatic aberration, 74-75 
Clarity slider 

Adjustment Brush, 104, 107, 116, 117 

Camera Raw Basic panel, 36-37, 156, 430 
Classic mode options, 123 
Cleanliness slider, 291 
Clear All button, 119 
Clear Crop option, 45 
clipping warnings, 31-32 
Clone Spot Removal option, 86 
Clone Stamp tool, 259 
CMYK conversion, 372 
collections, 1 1 
color 

background canvas, 379 

Camera Raw adjustments, 82-83 

changing for guides, 266-267 

composite photo, 239-240 

converting to B&W, 154-168 

filling selections with, 239 

improving appearance of, 57, 289, 432 

lighting effects and, 309 

sampling with Eyedropper, 216, 239 

setting to none, 1 18 

text/title, 409 
Color blend mode, 217, 240 
Color Burn blend mode, 218 
color cast, 42, 87, 309, 376 
color channels 

adjusting individual, 42-43 

keyboard shortcuts for, 149 
color correction 

online chapter about, xvii 

printed photos and, 376 
Color Handling pop-up menu, 367, 371 
Color Lookup effects, 314-315 
color management, 354 

camera configuration, 354 

color profiles, 364-367 

monitor calibration, 361-363 

Photoshop configuration, 356-358 

printer configuration, 371-373 

warning messages, 358 
Color Mode pop-up menu, 373 
color noise reduction, 88-89 
Color Picker 

Adjustment Brush, 1 1 8, 1 1 9 



B&W conversions and, 160 

Graduate Filter tool, 110 

HUD pop-up version of, 209, 267 

keyboard shortcut assignment, 150 

Lighting Effects filter, 309 
Color Priority vignetting, 79 
color profiles, 97, 364-367, 379 
Color Range dialog, 379, 425 
Color Settings dialog, 356-357, 358 
color space 

camera configuration, 354 

Camera Raw configuration, 91 

Photoshop configuration, 356-358 

warning messages about, 358 
color swatches, 1 19 
color warning triangles, 32 
Colorize swatch, 309 
composite images, 237-240 

background lights effect, 320-323 

color adjustments, 239-240 

detail enhancement, 238 

fringe removal, 238 
Concepcion, RC, 176 
constrained cropping, 44 
Constraint lines, 241, 242-243, 244, 246-247 
Constraint tool, 242, 243, 246 
Contact Sheet II dialog, 377-378, 423 
contact sheets, 377-378 
Content panel, 13 
Content-Aware Fill 

landscape photo fixes, 431 

lens distortion fixes, 70-71 

off-limit item selections, 262 

panorama adjustments, 288 

tips for using, 350 

unwanted object removal, 258-263, 431 

wide-angle photo fixes, 245 
Content-Aware Move, 264-265 
Content-Aware Scale 

resizing parts of images, 146-148 

stretching/shrinking parts of images, 253-257 
Continuous High shooting mode, 174 
contrast 

adjusting with Curves, 38-43, 183, 403 

black-and-white conversions and, 155-156, 159 

creating with Targeted Adjustment tool, 41 

HDR image creation and, 183 



► 440 



Index 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



high-contrast portrait look, 272-277 

Instagram app look, 281 
Contrast slider 

Adjustment Brush, 108, 156 

Camera Raw Basic panel, 31 , 1 55, 281 , 429 
Convert for Smart Filters option, 21 2, 241 , 266, 305, 

404 
Convert to Grayscale checkbox, 154, 162, 164 
Convert to Profile dialog, 360 
Convert to Working RGB option, 358 
copyright information, 138, 351 
Crop indicator icon, 46 
Crop Shield, 124 
Crop tool (Camera Raw), 44-46 
Crop tool (Photoshop), 122-131 

cropping border, 122 

Delete Cropped Pixels option, 127 

Lights Out cropping option, 124 

Original Ratio option, 126 

Rule of Thirds overlay grid, 122 

Size & Resolution options, 128, 129 

standard size options, 124 

Straighten tool, 141-142 

tool presets, 130-131 
cropping photos, 122-131 

aspect ratio and, 44 

Camera Raw option for, 44-46, 149 

and canceling crops, 125 

canvas area added for, 126 

creating custom tools for, 130-131 

flipping the orientation for, 125 

geometric distortion and, 251 

histogram accuracy by, 97 

Lights Out mode for, 124 

overview of process for, 1 22-1 27 

panorama creation and, 287 

preset sizes for, 1 24 

rotating and, 123 

rule of thirds and, 49, 122 

sizing/resizing and, 128-129 

square crop ratio for, 280 

straightening and, 47, 141-142, 145 

vignetting and, 78-79 

wide-angle shots, 244, 247 
Cross, Dave, 1 50, 353 
Cross Fade transitions, 396, 414, 419 
cross-processing effect, 43 
curved line straightening, 247 



Curves 
Auto adjustment button, 49 
color corrections using, xvii, 42-43 
contrast adjustments using, 38-43 
HDR Pro dialog box, 183 
online chapter about, xvii 
RGB channel fixes using, 42-43 
saving as presets, 39, 43 

Curves adjustment layer, 49, 403 

Custom crop option, 45 

Customize Proof Condition dialog, 374 

D 

Darken blend mode, 310 

darkening prints, 375 

Darks slider, 40 

Datacolor Spyder4ELITE, 361 

Decontaminate Colors checkbox, 235 

Default button, 35, 48 

Default HDR preset, 187 

Defringe dialog, 238 

Defringe sliders, 75 

Delete key, 45, 48 

deleting 

adjustments, 101 

cropped pixels, 127 

empty layers, 209 

hidden layers, 424 

layer masks, 237 

lights, 308 

photos, 10, 13,48 

presets, 133 

star ratings, 1 1 

See also removing 
Density slider, 105 

Desaturate command, 240, 270, 274 
desaturated portrait effect, 270-271 
Deselect command, 217, 239, 245, 257 
Detail icon, 61 
Detail slider 

Camera Raw, 64 

Merge to HDR Pro dialog, 182 
Detect Faces checkbox, 425 
Difference blend mode, 201 
digital cameras 

calibrating Camera Raw for, 87 

camera profiles for, 24-25 

color space configuration, 354 



Index 



441 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



digital cameras (continued) 

HDR setup for, 172-174 

hiding info from, 351 

lens profiles for, 66-67, 248-249 

resizing photos from, 134-136 

white balance settings, 26, 27, 1 15 
digital noise reduction, 88-90 
digital photography workflow, 428-435 
distortion fixes 

Content-Aware Fill option, 70-71 

Free Transform used for, 70, 71-72 

Geometric Distortion checkbox, 248, 251 

Lens Corrections panel, 69 

Remove Distortion slider, 252 
Distortion slider 

Blur Tools panel, 297 

Lens Corrections panel, 69 
distraction removal, 258-263 
DNG (Digital Negative) format 

converting RAW files to, 80-81 , 350 

setting preferences for, 81 
DNG Profile Editor utility, 25 
docking Mini Bridge, 5 
Document Frame Rate option, 422 
documents 

duplicating specs for, 208, 324 

presets for creating, 1 32-1 33 
Dodge and Burn tools, 219-222 
dodging and burning 

in Camera Raw, 100-105 

in Photoshop CS6, 219-222 
double-processing images, 52-57 
double-stacking adjustments, 117 
download website, xiv, xvi 
downsizing photos, 143-144 
Drag to Apply dialog, 410 
dragging-and-dropping 

photos from Mini Bridge, 14-15, 169, 423 

size/resolution issues with, 145 

title slides into videos, 407 
dramatic lighting effect, 305-310 
drawing straight lines, 118 
dreamy focus effect, 278-279 
drop shadows, 209, 267, 401 
dull gray skies, 21 5-218 
duotone effects, 164, 166 
Duotone Options dialog, 166 
duplicating layers, 208, 219, 221, 238, 270 
Duration field, 389 



Edge Glow sliders, 1 80 

Edge Smoothness feature, 180, 184, 196, 198 

edge vignetting, 76-79 

adding, 77-79, 432 

HDR image, 185, 193, 197, 206-207 

post-crop, 78-79, 185, 206, 283 

removing, 76 
edit pins, 1 19 
editing 

JPEGs and TIFFs in Camera Raw, 20 

multiple photos, 58-60 

transitions in movies, 397 

video clips, 390-391,414 
effects. See special effects 
Effects icon, 282 
emailing photos, 97 
Embed Fast Load Data checkbox, 81 
empty layers, 209 

Enable Keyframe Animation control, 410 
Enable Lens Profile Corrections checkbox, 66, 69, 76 
Erase mode, Adjustment Brush, 104, 105, 114 
Esc key, 45, 47, 125 
EXIF data, 24, 66, 76, 87 
Expand Selection dialog, 216 

Content-Aware Fill and, 70, 245, 258, 287, 350 

Content-Aware Move and, 264 
exposure adjustments 

Adjustment Brush, 103, 104, 107 

black-and-white conversions and, 155 

Camera Raw Basic panel, 30-34, 35 
Exposure slider 

Adjustment Brush, 103, 104, 107, 116 

Camera Raw Basic panel, 30, 429 

Graduated Filter tool, 109, 110 

Lighting Effects filter, 309 

Merge to HDR Pro dialog, 1 81 
Exposure Value (EV), 179 
Eye icon, 118,201,271,308,315 
eye retouching, 107-108, 169 
Eyedropper tool 

channel adjustments and, 42 

ignoring adjustments using, 425 

ring appearing around, 216 

sampling colors with, 216, 239, 425 
eyeglass reflections, 223-227 



► 442 



Index 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



Fade Amount slider, 346 
Fade dialog 

Mode pop-up menu, 336 

Oil Paint filter, 294 

Unsharp Mask filter, 335, 434 
Fade In/Out options, 393, 396-397, 400, 418 
Fade Iris Blur option, 301 
Fade with Black transition, 397, 41 8 
Favorites list, Mini Bridge, 15 
Feather Selection dialog, 412 
Feather slider 

Adjustment Brush, 105 

Vignetting controls, 79 
Field Blur effect, 302-304 
File Handling options, 425 
File Info dialog, 351 
Fill dialog 

Content-Aware Fill, 71, 245, 259, 431 

tips for displaying, 169 
Fill field, Layers panel, 267 
Fill Light slider, 23, 33, 94-95 
Film & Video preset, 398, 406 
film grain look, 282 
filmstrip layout, 2, 4, 5 
Filter Items by Rating icon, 10 
filters 

Adaptive Wide Angle, 241-247 

Add Noise, 376 

Field Blur, 302-304 

Gaussian Blur, 177, 186, 207, 279 

High Pass, 177, 189-191, 347-348 

Iris Blur, 299-301,321 

Lens Correction, 207, 208, 248-252 

Lens Flare, 266 

Lighting Effects, 305, 306-310 

Liquify, 316-319 

Oil Paint, 290-294 

Reduce Noise, 96 

smart, 212, 241,244 

Smart Sharpen, 344-346 

Surface Blur, 240, 273 

Tilt-Shift Blur, 295-298 

Unsharp Mask, 278, 328-334, 404, 433 
Find dialog, 13 
finding photos 

in Bridge and Mini Bridge, 12-13 

Select Rated button for, 97 



fixing problem photos, 212-265 

backlit subjects, 212-214 

composite images, 237-240 

content-aware move for, 264-265 

dodging and burning for, 219-222 

dull gray skies, 21 5-218 

eyeglass reflections, 223-227 

group shot fixes, 228-230 

lens problems, 248-252 

making tricky selections, 231-236 

unwanted object removal, 258-263 

wide-angle shots, 241-247 
Flashlight preset, 306 
Flatten button, 165 

Flatten Image command, 57, 177, 244, 274 
flattening layers, 57, 165, 177, 267, 274 
floating panels, 4 
Flow slider, 105 
Focus option, 298 
Folders panel, 15 
font selection, 378, 379 
Forward Warp tool, 316-317 
Frame Rate pop-up menu, 422 
Free Transform 

creating cast shadows with, 267 

fixing lens distortion with, 70, 71-72 

reaching the handles of, 144, 254 

resizing photos with, 144, 146, 225, 254, 323, 
424-425 

rotating layers with, 225 

Show Transform Controls option, 425 
Freeze Mask tool, 318 
fringe removal, 238 
Full Screen Preview mode, 7, 13 
full-screen view 

Camera Raw mode for, 49, 96 

Mini Bridge mode for, 5, 8 

Spacebar shortcut for, 5, 8 
Fuzziness slider, 379, 425 



Gamma slider, 181 

Gamut Warning checkbox, 372 

gang scanning images, 145 

Gaussian Blur filter, 177, 186, 207, 279 

Gaussian Blur removal option, 344 

Geometric Distortion checkbox, 248, 251 

Gestures, disabling, 379 



Index 



443 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



ghosting problems, 188, 196-197 

glasses, fixing reflections in, 223-227 

Gloss slider, 309 

Go to First Frame icon, 386 

Gradient adjustment layer, 288, 398-399 

Gradient Editor dialog, 159-160, 288, 312-313 

gradient effects 

neutral density, 109, 288, 430 

panorama finishing, 288 

photographic toning, 312-313 

sky adjustments, 1 09-1 1 0, 217-21 8 

video bar, 398-401 
Gradient Fill dialog, 398 

Gradient Map adjustment layer, 159, 161, 31 1-313 
Gradient Picker, 398 
Gradient tool, 217 
Graduated Filter tool, 109-110, 430 
Grain Amount slider, 282 
gray card, 29 
gray skies, 215-218 
grayscale conversions. See black-and-white 

conversions 
Grayscale mode, 158, 165 
grids 

Lens Corrections panel, 150, 208 

rule-of-thirds, 49, 122 
group shot fixes, 228-230 
groups 

layer style, 423-424 

video, 385, 408, 413 
grungy high-contrast look, 276-277 
guides, preferences for, 266-267 

H 

hair selections, 231-236 

Hand tool, 350, 351 

Hard Light blend mode, 190, 348 

hardness of brushes, 150, 423 

hardware calibration, 361-363 

Harrington, Richard, 405 

HDR (High Dynamic Range) images, 171-207 

blended, 198-205 

Brush tool and, 191, 202-203 

camera setup for, 1 72-1 74 

creating in Photoshop, 179-186 

"down and dirty" workflow for, 175-178 

Edge Smoothness feature, 180, 184, 196, 198 

finishing techniques for, 206-207 



Gaussian Blur added to, 1 77, 1 86, 207 

ghosting problems in, 188, 196-197 

High Pass sharpening for, 177, 186, 189-191 

photorealistic look for, 187-188 

presets recommended for, 176, 180, 187 

processing in Camera Raw, 184-185, 192-195, 199 

single-image technique for, 1 92-1 95 

sliders used for, 180-183 

time saving tip for creating, 208 

vignettes applied to, 185, 193, 197, 206-207 
HDR Pro feature. See Merge to HDR Pro dialog 
HDR Toning dialog, 194 
Heal Spot Removal option, 86 
Healing Brush tool, 49, 261, 431 
hiding 

edit pins, 1 19 

Navigation pod, 4 

panels, 208 

Path Bar, 14 
High Pass sharpening 

HDR images and, 177, 189-191 

steps for applying, 347-348 
High Structure preset, 168 
high-contrast look 

action created for, 272-275 

Camera Raw technique for, 276-277 

composite images and, 240 

creating in Photoshop, 270-275 

trendy desaturated, 270-272 
Highlight Priority vignetting, 79, 185, 206 
highlights 

adjusting in photos, 32, 214 

clipping warning for, 31-32, 33 

split-toning effects and, 162-163, 282 
Highlights slider 

Adjustment Brush, 116 

Camera Raw Basic panel, 32, 320, 429 

Merge to HDR Pro dialog, 1 82, 1 84 

Tone Curve panel, 40, 41 
High-Speed Continuous Shooting mode, 174 
histogram, 97 
History panel, 1 18 
Hollywood, Calvin, 272 
hot spot removal, 49 
Hotspot slider, 309 

HSL/Grayscale panel, 82-83, 154, 162-163, 164 
HUD pop-up Color picker, 209, 267 



► 444 



Index 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



Hue/Saturation adjustments 
duotone effects and, 164 
print color cast and, 376 
split-toning effects and, 162-163 

Hughes, Bryan O'Neil, 342 

I 

ICC profiles, 365 

Image Processor dialog, 137-138 

Image Size dialog, 93, 134-136, 139-140, 355 

Infinite Light style, 308 

Instagram look, 280-283 

Intensity slider, 307, 309 

Invert command, 240, 273, 314 

Iris Blur effect, 299-301,321 

ISO settings, 174 

iStockPhoto, 392, 41 1 

J 

JPEG files 

editing in Camera Raw, 20, 27 

opening in Camera Raw, 13, 18-19, 58, 324 

saving 16-bit images as, 150 

K 

Katz, Shelly, 359 
Kelby, Scott, vii 

kelbytraining.com website, xiv, xvi 
keyboard shortcuts 

blend mode, 48 

brush size, 107, 1 1 1 

channel, 149 

Color Picker, 150 

Full Screen mode, 49 

layer functions, 267, 325 

Mini Bridge Review mode, 6 

slide show controls, 15 

video controls, 386, 387, 389 
keyframe animation, 410 
keyword search, 12 
Kloskowski, Matt, 117 
Kost, Julieanne, 149 
Kuler utility, 209 



Lab color mode 



improving colors using, 57, 289, 432 

sharpening technique using, 336 
Lasso tool, 147, 258, 260, 431 
layer masks 

adjustment layers and, 266 

Color Range adjustments, 379 

copying between layers, 267 

creating from transparencies, 149 

permanently applying, 237 
layer styles 

adding Drop Shadow, 209, 401 

applying to multiple layers, 423-424 

setting defaults for, 149 
layers 

aligning, 201, 224, 229 

creating merged, 240, 271, 273 

deleting empty, 209 

duplicating, 208, 219, 221, 238, 270 

filter bar for hiding/showing, 424 

flattening, 57, 165, 177, 267, 274 

inverting, 240, 273 

loading files into, 385, 413 

locking multiple, 351 

opacity settings for, 224 

removing hidden, 424 

renaming multiple, 208 

reordering, 325 

rotating, 225 

scaling photos on, 144 

scrolling through, 1 18 

searching for, 424 

viewing/hiding, 118, 201 

See also adjustment layers 
Layers panel 

Eye icon, 118, 201, 271 

Fill field, 267 
Left/Right Arrow keys, 387 
Lens Blur removal option, 344-345 
Lens Correction filter 

editing the grid in, 208 

fixing lens problems with, 248-252 

vignettes added with, 207, 432 
Lens Corrections panel 

alignment grid, 150 

chromatic aberration fixes, 74-75 

edge vignetting adjustments, 76-79 

lens distortion fixes, 69 

profile-based fixes, 66-67 
Lens Flare filter, 266 



Index 



445 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



lens problems 

Camera Raw fixes for, 66-73, 74-75, 76 

Photoshop CS6 fixes for, 248-252 

wide-angle photos and, 241-247 
lens profiles, 66-67, 248-249 
Levels adjustment layer, 49, 159 
Levels dialog, 57 
Light Bokeh slider, 321, 322 
lighting 

creating dramatic, 305-310 

soft spotlight effect, 1 1 4 
Lighting Effects filter, 305, 306-310 
Lightroom, Photoshop, 49, 357 
Lights Out cropping mode, 124 
Lights panel, 306, 308 
Lights slider, 40 
Linear curve, 39 
Liquify filter, 316-319 

Advanced Mode tools, 318-319 

brush resizing methods, 316, 317 

Forward Warp tool, 316-317 

Load Last Mesh button, 319 

retouching tip using, 324 
Load Last Mesh button, 319 
Local Adaptation HDR option, 179 
localized corrections, 100 
locking layers, 351 
lossy compression, 81 
Loupe feature, 7 
lower third options, 398-401 
luminance noise reduction, 89-90 
Luminosity blend mode, 359, 434 
luminosity sharpening, 335-341 

M 

MacBook Pro, 379 

Magic Wand tool, 215, 232, 245, 287 

margins, print, 370 

Masking slider, 64, 65 

Match Color dialog, 151 

Matting options, 238 

maximum sharpening, 331 

Medium Contrast curve, 38 

Merge to HDR Pro dialog, 179-184 

B&W image creation in, 350 

Edge Smoothness checkbox, 180, 184, 196, 198 

HDR image creation in, 179-186 

opening photos in, 175, 179 



overview of sliders in, 1 80-1 83 

photorealistic look using, 187-188 

recommended presets in, 176, 180, 187, 198 

Remove Ghosts checkbox, 188, 196-197 

tip on saving time in, 208 
Merge Visible command, 267, 287 
merged layers, 240, 271, 273 
mesh, Liquify filter, 319 
Metallic slider, 309 
Midpoint slider, 76, 77, 79, 206 
midtone contrast adjustments, 36-37 
Mini Bridge, 2-15 

accessing photos in, 2-3 

auto-collapse option, 423 

deleting photos in, 13 

docking to side panels, 5 

dragging-and-dropping from, 14-15 

favorites added to, 15 

finding photos in, 12-13 

full-screen preview, 5, 8 

killer tips about, 14-15 

launching in Photoshop, 2 

Navigation pod, 2, 4, 1 1 

opening a second image from, 423 

Path Bar, 3, 14, 15 

rating photos in, 7, 9-1 1 

renaming files in, 15 

resizing thumbnails in, 3, 5 

Review mode, 6-7, 14 

slide show shortcuts, 15 

sorting photos in, 8-1 1 

syncing with Bridge, 14 

thumbnail size slider, 4 

undocking, 4 

video files in, 384 

viewing photos in, 4-5 

See also Adobe Bridge 
miniaturization effect, 295-298 
Mobile & Devices preset, 325 
moderate sharpening, 331 
monitor calibration, 361-363 
Motion Blur removal option, 344 
Motion dialog, 422 
Move tool 

blended HDRs and, 201 

composite images and, 237, 323 

cropped photos and, 46, 127, 129 



► 446 



Index 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



group shot adjustments and, 229 

video text/titles and, 407, 409 

See also Content-Aware Move 
movies. See video 
Multiply blend mode, 375 
music for video, 392-393, 41 7 
Mute Audio checkbox, 393 
muting background music, 393 

N 

naming/renaming 

batch, 341 

files in Mini Bridge, 15 

multiple layers, 208 
narration for video, 394-395 
Navigation pod, 2, 4, 1 1 
negative clarity, 37, 107 
Nelson, Felix, xvii 

neutral density gradient effects, 109, 288, 430 
neutral gray card, 29 
New Action dialog, 272, 337 
New dialog, 132-133,208,324 
New Document Preset dialog, 133 
New Preset dialog, 39, 167 
New Smart Object via Copy option, 53, 94 
night lights background effect, 320-323 
Nik Software, Silver Efex Pro 2, 168 
Nikon cameras, 24, 25, 172, 173-174, 354 
noise 

adding, 376 

reducing, 88-90, 96, 116,209 
Noise Reduction slider, 116 
North America Prepress 2 setting, 357 
numerical field settings, 151 

o 

Oil Paint filter, 290-294 

Brush controls, 291-292 

Lighting controls, 293 
one-click presets, 167 
OnOne Software, 139 
Opacity settings 

B&W conversions and, 161 

blurred layers and, 279 

Brush tool and, 203, 275, 423 

Color Lookup effect and, 314 

composite images and, 240 



cropping process and, 124 

Fade dialog and, 294, 335 

HDR images and, 178, 186, 190 

multiple layers and, 224, 238 

scrubby sliders for, 151 

sharpening techniques and, 335, 348, 359, 434 

special effects and, 271 

spot removal and, 49 
Open Image button, 20, 45, 94, 431 
Open Object button, 52, 53, 94 
organizing photos, 8-11 
output sharpening, 349 
Overlay blend mode, 159, 177, 218, 236, 271, 274, 

412 
Overlay view, Refine Edge dialog, 234 



Paint Overlay vignetting, 79, 283 
painting 

B&W effect, 111-112 

noise reduction, 1 16 

oil paint effect, 290-294 

sharpness, 343 

soft spotlight, 114 

straight lines, 1 18 

white balance, 1 15 
Pan & Zoom option, 422 
panels 

floating, 4 

hiding, 208 

See also specific panels 
panoramas, 284-289 

Camera Raw adjustments for, 285 

Content-Aware Fill for, 288 

cropping to size, 287 

finishing moves for, 288-289 

Photomerge for creating, 285-287 

technique for shooting, 284 

vignette removal for, 296 
paper profiles, 364-367 
paper type selection, 373 
Parametric curve, 40-41 
Paste in Place command, 169 
Patch tool, 260, 261 
Path Bar, 3, 14, 15 
patterns/textures, 41 1-412 
Pen tool, 150 
Perceptual Rendering Intent, 372 



Index 



447 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



Perfect Resize plug-in, 139 
perspective fixes, 250 
Photo Filter adjustments, 323 
photo lab printing, 360 
photo toning effects, 311-313 
Photomerge feature, 285-287 
photorealistic HDR images, 187-188 
photos 

auto-correcting, 35 

bracketing, 173-174 

cropping, 44-46 

deleting, 10, 13, 48 

emailing, 97 

rating, 7, 9-11, 49 

retouching, 106-108 

reviewing, 6-7 

rotating, 96, 123 

sorting, 8-1 1 

straightening, 47 

viewing, 4-5 
Photoshop CS6 

color space configuration, 356-358 

digital photography workflow, 428-435 

Mini Bridge feature, 2-15 

preference replacement, 324 

process versions, 22-23 

RAM allocation, 325 

video feature, 382-422 
Photoshop for Video (Harrington), 405 
"Photoshop Killer Tips" sections, xvii 
Photoshop Lightroom, 49, 357 
Photoshop Manages Color option, 367, 371 
Pixel Grid option, 208 
Place command, 41 1 
playhead, 386 
plug-ins 

disabling third-party, 208 

Perfect Resize plug-in, 139 

Silver Efex Pro 2 plug-in, 168 
Point curve, 38-39, 42 
Polygon Constraint tool, 246 
portraits 

desaturated, 270-271 

high-contrast, 272-277 

retouching, 106-108, 316-319, 324 

sculpting, 316-319 

sharpening, 330 
Post Crop Vignetting, 78-79, 185, 206, 283 



poster-sized prints, 139-140 
preferences 

Bridge, 20 

Camera Raw, 35, 62, 81 , 324 

rebuilding in Photoshop, 324 
prepress settings, 357 
Preserve Cropped Pixels option, 46 
Preset Manager dialog, 131, 266 
presets 

B&W conversion, 168 

cropping, 124, 130-131 

curve, 39, 43, 403 

deleting, 133 

document, 132-133 

duotone, 166, 167 

Film & Video, 398, 406 

HDR image, 176, 180, 187 

Instagram effect, 283 

lighting effect, 306 

Mobile & Devices, 325 

one-click, 167 

Photographic Toning, 312 

tool, 130-131 

video format, 422 

white balance, 27 
Presets panel, 39, 167 
Preview area, Camera Raw, 49 
previewing 

photos, 6-7, 48 

videos, 388, 405 
Print dialog, 373 
Print Quality options, 373 
Print Selected Area checkbox, 369 
Print Settings dialog, 368-372 
Printer Profile pop-up menu, 371 
Printer Properties dialog, 373 
printing 

color profiles for, 364-367 

contact sheets, 377-378 

fixing images for, 375-376 

photo labs used for, 360 

quality settings for, 373 

resolution settings for, 93, 135, 355 

scaling images for, 369, 370 

selected parts of images, 369 

setting options for, 368-373 

sharpening images for, 359 



► 448 



Index 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



prints 

fixing problems with, 375-376 

poster-sized, 139-140 
process versions, 22-23, 95 
profiles 

camera, 24-25 

lens, 66-67, 248-249 

online search for, 249 

printer/paper, 364-367 
ProPhoto RGB color space, 91, 357 
Protect Details checkbox, 342 
Protect Skin Tones button, 255 
Protect Tones checkbox, 222 

Q 

quadtone effects, 165-166 

quality, print, 373 

Quick Selection tool, 54, 215, 231-233, 257 

R 

Radius slider 

Edge Glow feature, 180 

High Pass filter dialog, 190,347 

Refine Edge dialog, 233-234 

Refine Mask dialog, 56 

Shadows/Highlights dialog, 213, 214 

Sharpening controls, 63 

Smart Sharpen filter, 344 

Spot Removal tool, 106 

Unsharp Mask dialog, 329, 333 
RAM 

assigning to Photoshop, 325 

video feature and, 382 
Ramelli, Serge, 320 
rating photos, 7, 9-11, 49 
RAW images 

assigning color profiles to, 97 

auto-correcting, 35 

camera calibration for, 87 

camera profiles for, 24-25 

chromatic aberration fix, 74-75 

clarity applied to, 36-37 

color adjustments, 82-83 

contrast adjustments, 38-43 

converting to DNG format, 80-81, 350 

cropping, 44-46 

double-processing, 52-57 



edge vignetting in, 76-79 

editing multiple, 58-60 

exposure adjustments, 30-34 

giving to clients, 350 

gradient effects, 109-110 

histogram for, 97 

lens corrections, 66-73 

noise reduction, 88-90, 92 

opening in Camera Raw, 13, 18, 19, 324 

retouching, 106-108 

saving as DNGs, 80-81 

sharpening, 61-65 

spot removal, 84-86 

straightening, 47 

white balance adjustments, 26-29 

workflow settings, 91-93 

See also Camera Raw 
Recovery slider, 23, 32 
rectangle straightening, 246 
Rectangular Marquee tool, 70, 71 , 398, 41 2 
Recycle Bin icon, 97 
Red channel sharpening, 330, 342 
Red Eye tool, 169 
red-eye removal, 169 
Reduce Noise filter, 96 
Refine Edge dialog, 233-235 
Refine Mask dialog, 56 
Refine Radius tool, 234 
reflections, eyeglass, 223-227 
rejected photos, 9 

Relative Colorimetric Rendering Intent, 372 
Remember Settings checkbox, 233 
Remove Distortion slider, 252 
Remove Ghosts checkbox, 188, 196-197 
removing 

chromatic aberration, 75 

edge vignetting, 76, 286 

eyeglass reflections, 223-227 

fringe in composites, 238 

red-eye problems, 169 

spots/blemishes, 84-86 

unwanted objects, 258-263 

See also deleting 
renaming. See naming/renaming 
Render Video dialog, 422 
Rendering Intent options, 372, 374 
Resample Image checkbox, 135, 136, 143, 355 
Reset Gradients option, 313 
Resize to Fit checkboxes, 138 



Index 



449 < 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



resizing. See sizing/resizing 
resolution 

contact sheet, 377 

guidelines for setting, 93 

image size and, 132-136, 143, 145 

print, 93, 135,355 

web, 93, 134 
Restore All button, 317 
retouching portraits, 106-108, 316-319, 324 
Reverse checkbox, 288 
Review mode, Mini Bridge, 6-7, 14 
RGB Color mode, 289, 432 
RGB curve adjustments, 42-43 
Rotate View tool, 96 
rotating 

canvas, 96 

crops, 123 

layers, 225 

photos, 96 

views, 96 
Roundness slider, 79 
rule-of-thirds cropping, 49, 122 
rulers 

displaying, 134 

unit-of-measure changes, 151 
Run Action checkbox, 138 



sampling colors in photos, 216, 239 
Saturation slider 

Adjustment Brush, 1 03, 1 1 1 , 1 1 8 

Hue/Saturation dialog, 376 

Merge to HDR Pro dialog, 183 
Save As Defaults button, 213 
Save Image button, 80, 325, 349 
Save Mask to Channels checkbox, 298 
Save Options dialog, 80, 325, 350 
Save Selection dialog, 257 
saving 

16-bit photos to JPEG, 150 

Auto Save feature for, 425 

automated resizing and, 137-138 

Camera Raw defaults, 61 

RAW files as DNGs, 80-81 

selections, 147, 257, 262 

videos, 422 
Scale slider 

Lens Correction filter, 251 

Oil Paint filter, 292 



Scale to Fit Media checkbox, 369, 370 
scaling 

content-aware, 146-148, 253-257 

images to print, 369, 370 

lighting effects, 307, 308 

photos on layers, 144 

See also sizing/resizing 
Scott5 HDR Pro preset, 176, 180, 198, 204 
Screen blend mode, 266, 375 
scrubbing video clips, 388, 390 
scrubby sliders, 151 
sculpting portraits, 316-319 
S-curves, 43, 183 
Search Online button, 249 
searching for photos. See finding photos 
Select All button, 46, 59, 60 
Select Rated button, 97 
selections 

deselecting, 232, 257 

edge-of-document, 351 

expanding, 70, 216, 245 

filling with color, 239 

making tricky, 231-236 

saving, 147, 257, 262 

skin tone, 425 

softening edges of, 412 

viewing, 233, 234 
sepia-tone images, 164 
Set Additional Crop Options icon, 123, 124 
Set Start/End of Work Area bar, 387 
shadows 

adjusting in photos, 32-33, 212-214 

creating cast, 267 

drop, 209, 267, 401 

duotones and, 164 

noise reduction and, 96, 1 16 

split-toning effects and, 162-163, 282 
Shadows slider 

Adjustment Brush, 116, 156 

Camera Raw Basic panel, 32-33, 156, 429 

Merge to HDR Pro dialog, 1 76, 1 82 

Tone Curve panel, 40 
Shadows/Highlights adjustment layer, 266, 434 
Shadows/Highlights dialog, 213-214, 274 
Sharpen tool, 342-343 
Sharpening sliders, 63-65 
sharpening techniques, 328-349 

batch sharpening, 339-341 

Camera Raw and, 61-65, 349 



► 450 



Index 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



Channels panel and, 330 

dreamy focus effect, 278 

essentials of, 328-334 

HDR images and, 177, 189-191 

High Pass sharpening, 177, 189-191,347-348 

landscape sharpening, 433 

luminosity sharpening, 335-341 

output sharpening, 349 

portrait sharpening, 330 

print sharpening, 359 

sample settings, 329-334 

Sharpen tool and, 342-343 

Smart Sharpen filter and, 344-346 

soft subjects and, 330 

Web images and, 332 
Sharpness slider, Adjustment Brush, 107 
Shine slider, 293 

shortcuts. See keyboard shortcuts 
Show Cropped Area checkbox, 124 
Show Grid checkbox, 208 
Show Mask checkbox 

Adjustment Brush, 102, 119 

Liquify filter, 318 
Show Overlay option, 49 
Show Reject Files option, 9 
Show Thumbnails Only option, 14 
Silver Efex Pro 2 plug-in, 168 
single-image HDR effect, 192-195 
Size pop-up menu, 92 
sizing/resizing 

automated saving and, 137-138 

brushes, 107, 111, 119, 150,316,317 

cropping and, 128-129 

digital camera photos, 134-136 

downsizing process and, 143-144 

dragging photos and, 145 

Free Transform used for, 144, 146, 225, 254, 323, 
424-425 

images to print, 369, 370 

interpolation method for, 425 

parts of images, 146-148, 253-257 

photos on layers, 144 

poster-sized prints, 139-140 

Preview area, 49 

RAW images, 92 

resolution and, 132-136, 143, 145 

thumbnails, 3, 5, 388 

tip for speeding up, 424-425 



skin softening, 37, 107 

skin tone selections, 425 

sky adjustments, 1 09-1 1 0, 21 5-218, 429 

Slideshow Options dialog, 15 

smart filters, 212, 241, 244, 404 

smart objects 

converting layers into, 266, 305, 404 

creating new via copy, 53, 94 

double-processing images using, 53-54 

dragged-and-dropped images as, 169 

opening images as, 53, 55, 94 

page icon indicating, 94 

setting preferences for, 169 
Smart Radius checkbox, 56, 233 
Smart Sharpen filter, 344-346 
snapshots, 1 18 
Snapshots icon, 48 
Snapshots panel, 1 18 
Soft Glow finishing move, 207 
Soft Light blend mode, 57, 159, 178, 186, 207, 218, 

271 
soft proofing process, 374 
soft subject sharpening, 330 
softening skin, 37, 107 
softness of brushes, 150, 423 
Sort icon, 8 
sorting photos, 8-1 1 
Spacebar 

full-screen view with, 5, 8 

Hand tool accessed with, 350, 351 

resuming slide shows with, 1 5 
special effects, 270-323 

Camera Raw used for, 111-114, 276-277 

Color Lookup effects, 314-315 

desaturated skin look, 270-271 

dramatic lighting effect, 305-310 

dreamy focus effect, 278-279 

Field Blur effect, 302-304 

high-contrast portrait look, 272-277 

Instagram look, 280-283 

Iris Blur effect, 299-301 

night lights background effect, 320-323 

oil painting effect, 290-294 

panorama creation, 284-289 

photo toning effects, 31 1-313 

sculpting with Liquify filter, 316-319 

Tilt-Shift Blur effect, 295-298 
Split at Playhead icon, 394, 395 



Index 



451 4 



The Adobe Photoshoo CS6 B 



for Digital Photographers 



split-toning effects, 162-163, 282 

Spot Healing Brush, 203, 260, 261, 262-263 

Spot Removal tool, 49, 84-86, 106 

Spring Loaded Tools, 325 

Spyder4ELITE calibrator, 361 

square crop ratio, 280 

sRGB color space, 97, 354, 356, 358, 360 

star ratings, 7, 9-11, 49 

collections and, 1 1 

removing from photos, 1 1 

selecting images with, 97 
Steinhardt, Dan, 355 
straight lines, 1 18 
Straighten tool 

Camera Raw, 47 

Photoshop, 141-142 
straightening 

automated cropping and, 145 

Camera Raw option for, 47 

curved lines, 247 

Photoshop option for, 141-142 

rectangles, 246 
stretching parts of images, 253-257 
Stroke layer effect, 151 
Strong Contrast curve, 38, 156, 403 
Stylization slider, 291 
Surface Blur filter, 240, 273 
Symmetric Distortion checkbox, 297 
Synchronize dialog, 59, 86 
synchronizing 

Big and Mini Bridge, 14 

edits for multiple photos, 59-60, 86 

T 

tablets, designing for, 325 

Tabs feature, 149, 151 

Targeted Adjustment tool (TAT), 41 

color adjustments using, 82-83 

contrast adjustments using, 41 
Temperature slider 

Adjustment Brush, 1 15 

Camera Raw Basic panel, 27-28 
text 

font selection, 378, 379 

video clip, 401, 406-410, 420-422 

warp animation, 410 
Texture pop-up menu, 309 
textures/patterns, 41 1-412 



Thaw Mask tool, 318 

third-party plug-ins, 208 

three-click B&W conversion, 158-161 

Threshold slider, 329, 334 

thumbnail size slider, 4 

thumbnails 

contact sheet, 378 

full-screen view of, 5 

layer mask, 237 

resizing, 3, 5, 388 

showing only, 14 

Timeline panel, 388 
TIFF files 

editing in Camera Raw, 20, 27 

opening in Camera Raw, 13, 18-19, 58, 324 
Tile All Vertically option, 407 
Tilt-Shift Blur effect, 295-298 
Timeline panel, 384, 386-389 
Tint slider 

Adjustment Brush, 103 

Camera Raw Basic panel, 27-28 
titles/text for videos, 406-410, 420-422 
tonal corrections, 35 

Tone Curve panel, 38-43, 156, 281-282, 283 
Tool Presets panel, 130-131 
tools 

fast switching between, 325 

resetting to defaults, 350 

See also specific tools 
tourist removal, 258-259 
transitions, 396-397, 400, 410, 414 
Trash icon, 97 

trendy desaturated skin look, 270-271 
tricky selections, 231-236 
trimming video clips, 390-391, 414 
tritone effects, 165 
type 

font selection, 378, 379 

video clip, 401, 406-410, 420-422 
Type tool, 401 , 406, 408, 420 



u 



Unconstrained crop, 126 
Undo command, 35, 1 14, 317 
undocking Mini Bridge, 4 



► 452 



Index 



"he Adobe Photoshoo CS6 



for Digital Photographers 



Unsharp Mask filter 

dreamy focus effect and, 278 

essentials of using, 328-334 

landscape sharpening and, 433 

lens correction problems and, 72 

luminosity sharpening and, 335 

panorama adjustments and, 289 

print sharpening and, 359 

sample settings, 329-334 

video feature and, 404 

See also sharpening techniques 
unwanted object removal, 258-263, 431 
Up/Down Arrow keys, 252, 386 
Use Classic Mode checkbox, 123 

v 

Versace, Vincent, 140 

Vertical Perspective slider, 250, 251 

Vibrance slider 

Camera Raw Basic panel, 277, 281, 430 

Merge to HDR Pro dialog, 1 83 
video, 382-422 

adjustment layers, 402-403 

audio options, 392-395, 417, 418 

basic controls, 386-389 

blend modes, 411-412 

file format presets, 422 

filters used in, 404-405 

graphic bar creation, 398-401 

important points about, 382-383 

keyboard shortcuts, 386, 387, 389 

motion effects, 422 

opening in Photoshop, 384-385 

ordering clips for, 388, 415 

previewing, 388, 405 

project workflow, 413-422 

saving as movies, 422 

Timeline panel, 384, 386-389 

title and text options, 406-410, 420-422 

transitions, 396-397, 400, 410, 414, 419-420 

trimming, 390-391,414 
Video Groups, 385, 408, 413 
viewing 

full-screen images, 5, 8, 49 

photos in Mini Bridge, 4-7, 8 

selections, 233, 234 
vignette effects 

adding, 77-79, 432 



HDR image, 185, 193, 197, 206-207 
post-crop, 78-79, 185, 206, 283 
removing, 76, 286 
Vignetting slider, 76 
visual brush resizing, 316 
Vivid Light blend mode, 240, 272 
voice-over for video, 394-395 

w 

Wacom tablets, 96, 324 

warning triangles, 32 

Warp Text dialog, 410 

Web-based book resources, xiv, xvi 

websites 

color space for, 97 

image resolution for, 93, 134 

sharpening photos for, 332 

Weinrebe, Steve, 31 1 

White, Terry, 164 

White Balance adjustments 
Camera Raw options for, 26-29 
gray card used for, 29 
Match Color dialog for, 1 51 
painting with white balance, 1 15 

White Balance pop-up menu, 29 

White Balance tool, 28-29 

Whites slider, 33, 34, 155, 277, 429 

wide-angle photos 

cropping corrected, 244, 247 
fixing problematic, 241-247 

Workflow Options dialog, 91-93, 376 

workflow process, 428-435 

workspaces, 151 

X 

XMP files, 81,350 



zoom pop-up menu, 97 

Zoom tool, 36 

chromatic aberration and, 74 
click-and-drag option, 169 
noise reduction and, 88 
red-eye removal and, 169 
sharpening and, 49, 62 
spot removal and, 84 

zooming in/out, 318 



Index 



453 < 



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Digital Photographers 

By Scott Kelby 

• From sliders to settings, make your workflow faster, easier, and more fun 

• See Scott Kelby's own Lightroom 4 workflow and start using LR4 like a pro 

- Find out how and when to integrate Adobe Photoshop® into your workflow 



red trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated.Photogrs 



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From Scott Kelby's The Adobe® Photoshop® CS6 Book for Digital Photographers